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Philo-Duncan Falls Covered Bridge 35-60-U03x

Photos 

Columbus Metropolitan Library

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)

View this photo at digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org

BH Photo #279830

Description 

The town of Philo was originally known as Taylorsville.

Facts 

Overview
Lost Covered Through truss bridge over Muskingum River on Bridge Street
Location
Duncan Falls, Muskingum County, Ohio
Status
Destroyed by flooding
History
Built January 13, 1875; Rebuilt 1884 on higher level; Damaged by wind in 1908 and 2 spans replaced with iron, washed out in 1913 flood
Builders
- Smith Bridge Co. of Toledo, Ohio (superstructure)
- T.B. Townsend of Zanesville, Ohio (substructure)
Design
Five-span, covered Smith through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 160.0 ft.
Total length: 798.0 ft.
Deck width: 16.0 ft.
Also called
Duncan Falls-Philo Covered Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.86925, -81.90920   (decimal degrees)
39°52'09" N, 81°54'33" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/422242/4413640 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Philo
Inventory numbers
WGCB 35-60-U03x (World Guide to Covered Bridges number)
BH 60253 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • August 7, 2022: Updated by Paul Plassman: Added truss type, span length, and deck width
  • July 4, 2022: New photos from Brandon Cooper
  • December 26, 2020: New photo from Geoff Hubbs
  • March 14, 2014: Added by Dave King

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

Philo-Duncan Falls Covered Bridge 35-60-U03x
Posted July 7, 2017, by Anonymous

Muskingum County was nearly sued by the Federal Government because this bridge was too low to allow canal boat traffic to pass beneath it.

According to reports from the Corps of Engineers from the late 1800's, after the original canal was abandoned and the lock placed at the present location, boat traffic no longer had the clearance of the moveable canal bridge in the picture above and many larger boats were unable to clear the new passage underneath the main bridge.

I am fairly certain the piers from this bridge have been used in every rebuild of the bridge, including the one which still (barely) stands today.