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Neeld Road Bridge (old)

Facts 

Overview
Lost Warren through truss bridge over Conrail Railroad on Neeld Road
Location
Columbiana County, Ohio
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
History
Built 1940; replaced 1992
Railroads
- Penn Central Railroad (PC)
- Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR)
Design
Riveted, 4-panel Warren through truss with timber stringer approaches
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 104.0 ft.
Total length: 233.0 ft.
Deck width: 20.3 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.83198, -80.57331   (decimal degrees)
40°49'55" N, 80°34'24" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/535976/4520193 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory numbers
ODOT 1533355 (Ohio Dept. of Transportation structure file number)
BH 99775 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

4-panel truss (349)
Beam (17,102)
Built 1940 (1,124)
Built during 1940s (4,266)
Columbiana County, Ohio (76)
Lost (29,916)
Lost 1992 (474)
Lost during 1990s (4,172)
Ohio (4,654)
Owned by county (21,710)
Penn Central Railroad (1,572)
Pennsylvania Railroad (1,081)
Replaced by new bridge (20,348)
Riveted (2,643)
Skewed (5,071)
Span length 100-125 feet (4,616)
Through truss (17,796)
Timber stringer (4,388)
Total length 175-250 feet (4,589)
Truss (36,690)
Warren through truss (1,724)
Warren truss (7,088)

Update Log 

  • August 4, 2022: Updated by Paul Plassman: Added approach span design and categories "4-panel truss", "Riveted"
  • July 28, 2022: Updated by Brandon Cooper: Added categories "Penn Central Railroad", "Pennsylvania Railroad"

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

Neeld Road Bridge (old)
Posted August 4, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

This one was definitely unusual in terms of length and design. I wish this little beauty would have been saved for a museum or historical society.

Neeld Road Bridge (old)
Posted August 4, 2022, by Paul Plassman

This one's nifty! Don't often see a teensy little through truss like this...and a skewed one, no less!

Neeld Road Bridge (old)
Posted August 4, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

An interesting bridge that I'm glad got part of its history documented. It has a nice looking skew on it and is an unusual design for a railroad overpass