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Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge

Facts 

Note: The following information comes from the National Bridge Inventory and has not been verified.
Overview
Pony truss bridge over Baltimore & Ohio Railroad on TR 150
Location
Ashland County, Ohio
Status
Removed but not replaced; possibly preserved and reused
History
Built 1918; removed without replacement sometime between 2011 and 2013
Railroads
- Baltimore & Ohio Railroad (BO)
- CSX Railroad (CSX)
Design
Three-span, riveted Warren pony truss with no verticals
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 44.0 ft.
Total length: 106.0 ft.
Deck width: 17.7 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.04205, -82.19449   (decimal degrees)
41°02'31" N, 82°11'40" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/399604/4544112 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory numbers
OH 335614 (Ohio bridge number)
ODOT 335614 (Ohio Dept. of Transportation structure file number)
BH 35867 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • March 17, 2022: Updated by Paul Plassman: Noted removal of bridge;added truss type & categories "One-lane traffic", "Riveted", "4-panel truss"

Comments 

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 18, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

Pennsylvania , Baltimore, Whipple and Pratt trusses are the most confusing to count for me. Just a lot of action going on.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 18, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

Pratts are confusing due to the arrangement of the sway bracing.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 18, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Funny this discussion is going on a page named for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, since most people mis-count panels when they don't count the subdivided panels on Baltimores (and Pennsylvanias) for examples. These subdivisions were intended to increase the number of floorbeams and thus reduce the depth (and weight) of deck stringers. If you are curious for an example of one of the "odd situations" Mike mentioned, one that comes to mind is a bridge in Ontario which features a floorbeam at each bottom chord batten plate... a strange arrangement that I suspect was intended to minimize the depth of steel underneath the deck for flooding issues. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=o...

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 18, 2022, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

On most trusses the triangles do tell you how many panels. It is just trusses like this no vertical Warren and the Baltimore, Pennsylvania and Whipple trusses that can get confusing at times.

Keep asking those questions and learning.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 18, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

Oh OK. I was going by the triangles shapes. I wonder how many bridges have been miscounted on or have been categorized wrong, as I thought I had labelled a bridge as a Warren through truss with all verticals, but it is labelled on here as such.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 18, 2022, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Brandon,

I think you are starting to get if figured out, you just counted on the wrong side of the truss. As Nathan said, the floor beams pretty much dictate your panel numbers, except in odd situations. Check out this graphic for the bridge, hopefully this helps out.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

I think I might be figuring it out. I tried my favorite railroad bridge, and it looks like I count 3 panels, as I counted the solid bars. https://bridgehunter.com/oh/muskingum/bh37139/

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

I think I got this particular bridge figured out. I see 4 triangle sections that look a little more rigid and have more building material than the other three sections.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

Baltimore trusses and Pennsylvania trusses are ultra complex and just baffle my mind, especially Pennsylvania trusses. They are intimidating, even more so on a railroad structure as they are just tall and ungainly looking.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

That approach works best. Where people get tripped up on panel counts is when they fail to count the subdivided trusses properly and they only count the gaps between full vertical members. On Baltimores and Pennsylvanias the shorter vertical lower chord connections must be counted too. That is the essence of what subdivision does... adding panels (and thus floorbeams) to reduce the length (and thus depth) of deck stringers, resulting in overall weight reduction.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Paul Plassman

By the number of segments in between connection points on the lower chord - in this case, four. Usually the part of a truss in between two vertical members is considered a panel...not in the case of this bridge, however, as there are no verticals!

It's easier to see on a bridge like this one, which has 11 panels: http://bridgehunter.com/oh/ashland/hog-hollow/

Not sure how good of an explanation that was, but hope it helps!

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

How does one count the panels on a truss bridge?

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted March 17, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Historic aerials show that this bridge was removed without replacement between 2011 and 2013 and the road re-routed along the south side of the railroad tracks to avoid crossing them.

Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Bridge
Posted October 8, 2010, by Eric Root

Listed on ODOT site as being available for reuse

http://www.dot.state.oh.us/divisions/transsysdev/environment...