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Greenbush Bridge

Photos 

File:Steamboat Square Albany, New York

Old bridge in back right of photo

View this photo at en.m.wikipedia.org

BH Photo #317365

Description 

This bridge was originally designed with two decks, for road traffic below and railroad traffic above, but the upper deck was never completed. In the late 1890's, the upper deck on the pivot span briefly held a roof garden.

Facts 

Overview
Lost Through truss bridge over Hudson River on US20/US9
Location
Albany, Albany County, New York, and Rensselaer County, New York
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
History
Built 1882; opened January 24, 1882; replaced 1933; demolished 1935 or later
Builder
- Kellogg Bridge Co. of Buffalo, New York
Railroads
- Albany & Hudson Railroad & Power Co. (A&H; A&HR&PC)
- Albany Southern Railroad (AS)
- Interurban
Design
(1)22-panel through truss swing span
(2)15-panel triple-intersection Pratt through truss spans
(2)9-panel Whipple through truss spans with vertical endposts
Approximate latitude, longitude
+42.64341, -73.74784   (decimal degrees)
42°38'36" N, 73°44'52" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/602650/4721976 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Troy South
Inventory number
BH 66307 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • May 9, 2022: New photo from Dave King
  • April 22, 2022: Updated by Paul Plassman: Added truss types, historical information, & categories
  • May 9, 2021: New photo from Geoff Hubbs
  • January 10, 2018: New photo from Dave King
  • June 1, 2016: New photo from Douglas Butler
  • May 23, 2016: Updated by Luke: Correct name + added build date & builder
  • March 17, 2016: New photo from Art Suckewer
  • January 25, 2016: New photo from Douglas Butler
  • March 2, 2015: New photo from Douglas Butler
  • February 27, 2015: Added by Dave King

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

Greenbush Bridge
Posted January 10, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Looks like proof of the legend that once long ago there was more than one Triple Whipple Bridge... ie a triple intersection Pratt.