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Charles Dana Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 17, 2022, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

New bridge is definitely in process. Abutment on NH side is pretty far along.

Posted March 23, 2022, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I subsequently discovered two or three additional through plate girder bridges on the northern branch of the Rockingham Recreational Trail (running from Lake Massabesic out to Rockingham Junction; this bridge is on the southeastern branch running to Windham). The photos are way down in my backlog, but I'll try to get to them eventually. Needless to say, this isn't the only remaining railroad-era bridge on the trail system.

Newbury Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted December 21, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Photo #2 looks like a different bridge, likely too small for the Connecticut River. Definitely a picturesque location!

Posted November 16, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge is in the news a lot today because the President is speaking about the infrastructure bill on it. For anyone curious what "repairs" are happening on this bridge, my understanding is the bridge is not being demolished, although the planned rehab of the bridge will be an adverse effect (meaning its a minimization approach, something that is better than demolition, but not a Sec. of Interior Standards rehab).

Posted October 28, 2021, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

See the thread of comments at http://bridgehunter.com/ca/yuba/oregon-creek/ as a way of understanding how and why I likewise continue to respectfully disagree with this bridges stated truss typology.

Berlin Mills Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted October 11, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very cool... Wish I lived closer!

Berlin Mills Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted October 11, 2021, by Steve Lindsey (SteveLindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

RiverFireChallenge on historic bridge. https://www.facebook.com/events/1193650754477604/

Posted October 11, 2021, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted September 29, 2021, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Probably finally de-listed due to being too small, methinks.

StreetView gives a date of November 2019.

Posted September 29, 2021, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge has not been listed in NBI since 2016. Not sure how old Street View is but shows it still standing.

Posted May 18, 2021, by Steve LaBonte (mvjct58 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Boston and Maine Railroad Bridge Number 93.74. 13.0 foot opening. 20.0 feet from top off rail to stream bed.

Posted March 31, 2021, by Latest on Anna Hunt Marsh bridge and companion. (SteveLindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

HINSDALE, N.H. — Folks on both sides of the Connecticut River will get another chance on April 1 to chime in on plans for the two bridges connecting Brattleboro with Hinsdale.

Plans for a new bridge over the river have been in the works for many years, and construction is expected to start this year. The bridge is expected to be open to traffic in late 2023.

The $50 million project also calls for the rehabilitation for pedestrian use of the Charles Dana and Anna Hunt Marsh bridges and the island they land on in the middle of the river.

A citizen’s advisory group, the Hinsdale-Brattleboro Bridge Project Advisory Committee, was formed to provide guidance to the agencies of transportation in New Hampshire and Vermont and to the towns of Hinsdale and Brattleboro.

And the Hinsdale-Brattleboro Existing Bridges Subcommittee was formed to focus specifically on the historic bridges, the island and their connections to the towns.

After taking public input about the project, the subcommittee turned to Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, to put that feedback into design ideas. On Oct. 15, 2020, those design ideas were presented to the public.

“April 1 will be the final presentation of the conceptual plan for the island and the bridges,” said JB Mack, principal planner for Southwest Region Planning Commission. “This will be the last opportunity for the public to weigh in.”

During the Oct. 15 forum, the designs that were presented included beaches, a kayak landing, boardwalks, an event area and small amphitheater, parking for food trucks, green space, walkways lined with flowers and a spot to fish.

Mack said the conceptual plan that will be presented on April 1 combined the best ideas from all the plans.

“The plan has evolved over time,” he said. “It includes an amphitheater on the island, wildlife viewing areas, a restroom, access to the river from the island and both river banks, and space on the island for food trucks.”

Mack said estimates of the project cost and ongoing maintenance cost might be available during the meeting.

“A lot of elected officials have concerns about the project costs and ongoing maintenance costs,” he said.

If the proposal is accepted, said Mack, it could serve as a blueprint for future grant applications to help pay for the project, for maintaining the bridges and keeping the lights on.

“We still have a long way to go after this,” he said.

To register to participate in the 6:30 p.m. forum, visit BIT.LY/APR1PREREG21.

Sometime this summer, said Mack, the subcommittee will present a report to the Hinsdale-Brattleboro Project Advisory Committee as well as the select boards in Hinsdale and Brattleboro.

“The report will be advisory in nature,” said Mack. “The conceptual plan also identifies some opportunities for private-public partnerships which could potentially help fund aspects of the plan or answer some of the questions relating to ongoing maintenance or public safety. It will take some time to develop those plans. That being said, we do have time. It will be difficult to implement any changes to the island and bridges until the new bridge is built.”

Bob Audette can be contacted at raudette@reformer.com.

https://www.benningtonbanner.com/local-news/forum-set-on-bri...

Posted March 31, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Definitely not a Lattice truss, Possibly a Burr or a Paddleford with laminated arches.

Posted December 16, 2020, by Scott Stevens (sstevens [at] audleyconstruction [dot] com)

Old Structure being taken down.

Posted December 16, 2020, by Scott Stevens (sstevens [at] audleyconstruction [dot] com)

Photos of new structure completed in 2016

Posted December 2, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

What a find, while going through old family photos on color slides. My father photographed this bridge in 1952, with my mother standing by watching a period pickup truck cross the bridge. The sign at the left clearly points across the bridge to "Passaconaway", which is now mostly a ghost town located along route NH-112 (Kankamagus Highway) west of Conway NH. That sign definitely identifies where this picture was taken, and which bridge this is.

Since this is the east portal, and the sun is shining on the bridge deck itself, this picture was taken at about mid-morning.

This 1952 picture also shows that arson of wooden bridges is not a new phenomenon! Fortunately the fire didn't cause extreme damage, though that may be why it had no siding in 1952. The substructure was apparently not damaged at all. The lack of siding really shows off the Paddleford truss design in this photo.

I also changed the name of the road that crosses the bridge to Passaconaway Road, per NBI and Google maps.

(Picture that would have been here is now #41 above.)

Posted November 16, 2020, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Plans moving ahead to preserve this and it's nearby cousin to access Island Park, a newly created park, once the new 1800' bridge is built downstream.

https://www.sentinelsource.com/news/local/hinsdale-brattlebo...

Posted November 7, 2020, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like this one got bypassed. I found this photo on Facebook.

Posted August 27, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow, what a difference not having snow on the ground makes for getting photos of this bridge!

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted August 26, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Site visit 08/26/20: Bridge superstructure is in good condition. Substructure appears to be in good condition but could not definitively confirm. Deck is in fair condition but needs some work. There is evidence of rotting of the wooden planks, and some of the planks are starting to come loose.

Posted August 9, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nick B.,

In addiion to Nathan's listing, here is this listing for the NH bridge you found. Thanks for posting current pictures!

Can anyone with the right permissions tie the other posts to this entry?

Here are the other known surviving Moseley's in case anyone wants to take a road trip:

https://bridgehunter.com/ma/essex/moseley/

https://bridgehunter.com/vt/bennington/mosley/

The fourth one is also listed as a Moseley but, I've always though it was a Joseph G. Henszey / Continental Bridge Co. of Philadelphia:

https://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/hares-hill/

Actually, if Hare's Hill is a Moseley, there are several entries presently attributed to Henszey that may need to be revised.

Regards,

Art S.

Cheshire Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted August 8, 2020, by Luke

The railroad wholly owned the bridge, so the tolls directly funded the Boston & Maine-owned Springfield Terminal. The Guilford-era ST abandoned the line ca. 1983, but continued to own it until 1992 when New Hampshire bought it. They collected tolls until 2001, per Wikipedia

https://cite.case.law/nh/126/425/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cheshire_Bridge_(Connecticut_R...)

Cheshire Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted August 8, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Site visit 08/06/20: Bridge needs a paint job. Large patches of brick-red rust are visible on the otherwise gray paint scheme. It does create a unique paint scheme in a way, but I know that it's not supposed to be that way.

Does anyone know when this bridge ceased to be a toll bridge? Also, when this was a toll bridge, was it privately owned, or a joint-state venture? And which side (NH or VT) was the toll booth located on? I couldn't find out any of these things during my site visit.

Posted July 27, 2020, by Mary Cooney (mrcooney464 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Correction to previous message. The bridge burned in 1902

Posted July 25, 2020, by Mary Cooney (mrcooney464 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wish you had a picture of this previously covered RR bridge. I have been searching for an old photo before the fire in 1901. I have an article about the fire and reconstruction (there are pictures)which produced a working bridge in 5 hours less than 1 week according to my grandfather's diary. He was the Chief Train Dispatcher for the B&M at the time stationed in Woodsville, NH. The pictures of the current bridge are beautiful and show its construction very well. Also, I don't see offhand the length of the bridge.

Posted July 2, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, I found out what exactly is going on with the so-called rehabilitation of this bridge (so-called because according to this source, this isn't the first time it's been delayed).

https://www.conwaydailysun.com/news/local/nhdot-returns-whit...

Posted June 27, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Made a site visit today. Something is holding up the rehabilitation of this bridge. The structure is still sitting on the Nudd Road approach and is closed to all traffic. The entire deck is mostly missing, and a pile of wood north of where the bridge is sitting looks to be the parts of the deck. Cinderblocks have been placed under the bridge to raise it up, so you can walk under/"inside" the bridge. Covered Bridge Road is now gated before the bridge approach, with multiple "No Parking Police Order" signs. I'm not sure what exactly is going on here, but I'll try to upload my photos later.

Posted June 15, 2020, by Matt Lohry

Yes, I would concur that this is a railroad bridge in its original location. The trail that the bridge services was obviously a railroad with its very long straight stretches and very gradual curves, characteristics of rail lines. Also, the bridge has "in-riggers", which would be quite hazardous for road traffic.

Posted June 14, 2020, by Ian Martin

This is almost certainly a railroad bridge since this part of the Rockingham Recreational Trail is the former B&M Worcester, Nashua & Portland division mainline. Interestingly, this segment was abandoned in the 1930s, which makes it surprising that the bridge survived long enough to become part of the trail - all of the other steel bridges between Nashua and Fremont were removed. However, the stub from Fremont to Epping remained active until the 1980s, and it's possible that the remaining active track/railroad property extended across the bridge. Details/source here: https://railroad.net/viewtopic.php?style=18&t=154729.

Posted June 13, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I visited the bridge site today and discovered an interesting situation. The original bridge has been replaced with a new modern concrete slab bridge, but yet was still posted for a 10 ton weight limit. However, the bridge is still completely closed to vehicular traffic... which makes the weight limit posting strange. I am unsure when this replacement bridge was put into place, but as far as I know the road was never reopened to through traffic. I find it curious that they would bother putting in a replacement bridge if they indeed were never planning to reopen the road as mentioned by Brianna below (which seem very reasonable... Windham High School aside, the vast majority of the houses in the area appear to be extremely wealthy and high-value developments). You can walk out on the new bridge, although there is technically no "legal" place to park (I parked directly in front of the Jersey barrier on the south side, which worked out okay. The north side is too narrow and is right next to an active intersection). The views of Beaver Brook are nice, but the new bridge is definitely inferior to the original wooden bridge/culvert in more ways than one.

Posted June 3, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was able to get up to this location today and did get several photos despite some spotty rain showers. Basically, the main span cables and towers are 100% or almost 100% intact, but the back stays on both sides are completely missing, and the deck has almost entirely collapsed. Small fragments of what appears to have been a metal deck remain hanging on for dear life from the vertical suspenders. There are several broken sections of metal pipe that are (barely) connected to the main span cables, so I'm wondering if this used to be a pipeline bridge of some sort. There is still no evidence of a larger/western bridge across the main channel of the river (no abandoned piers or stubs or anything), which only adds to the mystery of this structure since as noted in the description, the western terminus of this bridge is a tiny island far too small to have ever had any kind of development on it.

I will try to get around to uploading my photos tomorrow.

Posted June 3, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am planning to try and get over to this area today and assuming everything goes according to plan I will take a closer look at this "bridge", or at least what's left of it. I have still been unable to find any information whatsoever about the structure or its likely much larger companion structure in any online sources.

Posted April 14, 2020, by Luke

This design is super common for railroad overpasses. One of the "If it ain't broke, why fix it? designs that were the common choice for rural crossings until rather recently.

If not plain timber stringers, it would be a timber stringers augmented with relocated railroad bridge spans. Typically lightweight/outmoded pony trusses and through girders.

John Marvig has documented several for the site.

Posted April 14, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nick: You have to use "Try to find in NBI" for anything prior to the latest listing; this bridge remained listed up until 2017.

Going through BridgeReports will only give you the latest (2018) listing.

Posted April 14, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Okay,Justin.I didn't know that about the credit line.Thanks.

Posted April 14, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Luke: I was not able to locate this bridge at BridgeReports.com - where did you find the NBI data?

A 1942 build date actually seems a bit young/early to me given my observations - it looked like a structure that dated back to the original days of the railroad.

Posted April 14, 2020, by Justin

George, as I noted in my other post, the photo credit line already states when he took the photographs. Him re-stating what has already been stated in the comments is redundant/superfluous.

Posted April 13, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Actually Justin,Nick was just saying the date when the pictures were taken.

Posted April 13, 2020, by Justin

The photos already say "Photo taken by Nick Boppel in April 2020", so don't you think your comment is a bit superfluous?

Posted March 2, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

If this replaced the MEC Frankenstein Trestle, shouldn't it be referred to as the Son Of Frankenstein?

Main Street Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted February 29, 2020, by Bryan H (bryan_hebert2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is about to be replaced. It is currently down to one lane, one-way travel, and will be closed in March 2020, dismantled, re-built, with the original stone facing to be re used on the new bridge facade to restore the current historic aesthetic.

Charles Dana Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted December 21, 2019, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Project moving head with funding for new bridge, but also funds for existing heritage spans too.

End near for 'Malfunction Junction' in Hinsdale and Brattleboro?

By JAKE LAHUT Sentinel Staff Dec 21, 2019 Updated 6 hrs ago

Bridging the funding gap

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, left, walks through the snow Friday with N.H. Transportation Commissioner Victoria Sheehan and DOT Director of Operations David Rodrigue after viewing the Hinsdale Route 119 bridges connecting Brattleboro.

HINSDALE — After years of waiting, a new bridge connecting Hinsdale and Brattleboro has a secure funding source and a tentative construction plan to start within the next two years.

The $50 million project got a boost recently when U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., announced a new $12 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

New Hampshire had applied for federal funding for the Hinsdale-Brattleboro bridge a few times before, but came up short, according to N.H. Department of Transportation Commissioner Victoria Sheehan.

Sheehan said the federal grant will prove highly consequential in the long-desired project getting over the finish line.

Otherwise, the whole cost would have had to be covered by bonds, tying up more department funds for interest payments, she said.

The plan is for the Granite and Green Mountain States to split the remaining costs between their transportation departments 83-17, respectively — since the Connecticut River is technically owned by New Hampshire — through bonds. The interest on those bonds will be covered by the regular federal funding both agencies get annually, Sheehan said.

Ideally, according to Sheehan and her assistant commissioner, Bill Cass, construction will begin in 2021, mostly focusing on the foundation in the riverbed. For the 2022 construction season, the steel girders and other parts of the bridge would be erected, with the goal of opening the new bridge — which is farther south of the current crossing — for traffic by the end of that year.

The biggest risk for potential delays, according to Sheehan and Cass, lies in the 13 properties on the Brattleboro side in the new bridge’s footprint. They said the Vermont Agency of Transportation is working on getting the right of way for each of them, but added Vermont’s right-of-way process is “more cumbersome” than New Hampshire’s, with a lengthy eminent domain battle in the courts — while unlikely — being the worst-case scenario.

Sen. Shaheen, a Democrat and former N.H. governor from 1997 to 2003, described the federal grant as a “down payment” on the project when meeting with local leaders late Friday afternoon in Hinsdale.

Shaheen examined the current bridges’ situation with N.H. DOT staff Friday. About half of Hinsdale residents drive over the two bridges connected by an island to get to work across the Connecticut River in Vermont, according to J.B. Mack, the principal planner for the Southwest Region Planning Commission.

The rickety, red-listed double truss bridges have raised concerns for years, and drivers can experience an average wait of 20 minutes during rush hour when there are train crossings on the Brattleboro side.

Once the frigid on-site visit wrapped up, Shaheen made her way over to the Hinsdale Police Department headquarters for a roundtable discussion on the new bridge, with the latest renderings on display.

As she took out her notebook and asked everyone to introduce themselves, Edwin “Smokey” Smith of Hinsdale quipped that he had been at meetings like these for Hinsdale-Brattleboro bridge committees since 1986.

Smith, a Republican state representative for seven terms who now volunteers on various boards, recalled working on the bridge issue and economic development in southwestern New Hampshire with Shaheen when they were both at the Statehouse in the 1990s, initially in her tenure as a state senator and later from Concord’s corner office.

“As Ed knows, some of those same challenges existed when I was governor,” the U.S. senator said.

Several of those gathered around the table described Hinsdale as part of the “forgotten corner” of New Hampshire, a longstanding moniker in the political topography of the Monadnock Region.

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Mack described how the new bridge could improve the local economy beyond cutting down on traffic wait times for rail crossings.

“Hinsdale and Winchester ... are some of the most economically challenged communities in the state and Cheshire County,” Mack told Shaheen. “So we’ve been really looking forward to this for a long time to bring in new business opportunities and investment opportunities.”

Key to those goals is a plan to rehabilitate the existing double truss bridges to accommodate pedestrians and emergency vehicles, Mack said. Preserving the bridges flanking Hinsdale Island is included in the grant Shaheen announced last month.

Cyclists and hikers would be able to cross the river with ease, and tourists coming up from New York City or down from Montreal could access the potential island park from the nearby Amtrak station, according to Sue Fillion, Brattleboro’s planning services director.

Hiking paths leading to the Pisgah and Monadnock State Parks would also be made more accessible to Brattleboro with the revamped bridges, officials said.

Even for a cynic like Smith, who lamented decades of false promises over a new bridge — which he claims date back to the last hand-drawn bridge markup done by N.H. DOT — the federal grant brings high hopes for the end of what’s become known as “Malfunction Junction,” he said.

“I love the term,” Shaheen chuckled when Smith brought up the congestion during rail crossings toward the end of the roundtable meeting.

“I mean, only because I don’t have to sit in it every day.”

Jake Lahut can be reached at 352-1234, extension 1435, or jlahut@keenesentinel.com. You can follow him on Twitter @JakeLahut.

Posted December 21, 2019, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Senator just visited the site. Project moving head with funding for new bridge, but also funds for existing heritage spans too.

End near for 'Malfunction Junction' in Hinsdale and Brattleboro?

By JAKE LAHUT Sentinel Staff Dec 21, 2019 Updated 6 hrs ago

Bridging the funding gap

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, left, walks through the snow Friday with N.H. Transportation Commissioner Victoria Sheehan and DOT Director of Operations David Rodrigue after viewing the Hinsdale Route 119 bridges connecting Brattleboro.

HINSDALE — After years of waiting, a new bridge connecting Hinsdale and Brattleboro has a secure funding source and a tentative construction plan to start within the next two years.

The $50 million project got a boost recently when U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., announced a new $12 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

New Hampshire had applied for federal funding for the Hinsdale-Brattleboro bridge a few times before, but came up short, according to N.H. Department of Transportation Commissioner Victoria Sheehan.

advertisement

Sheehan said the federal grant will prove highly consequential in the long-desired project getting over the finish line.

Otherwise, the whole cost would have had to be covered by bonds, tying up more department funds for interest payments, she said.

The plan is for the Granite and Green Mountain States to split the remaining costs between their transportation departments 83-17, respectively — since the Connecticut River is technically owned by New Hampshire — through bonds. The interest on those bonds will be covered by the regular federal funding both agencies get annually, Sheehan said.

Ideally, according to Sheehan and her assistant commissioner, Bill Cass, construction will begin in 2021, mostly focusing on the foundation in the riverbed. For the 2022 construction season, the steel girders and other parts of the bridge would be erected, with the goal of opening the new bridge — which is farther south of the current crossing — for traffic by the end of that year.

The biggest risk for potential delays, according to Sheehan and Cass, lies in the 13 properties on the Brattleboro side in the new bridge’s footprint. They said the Vermont Agency of Transportation is working on getting the right of way for each of them, but added Vermont’s right-of-way process is “more cumbersome” than New Hampshire’s, with a lengthy eminent domain battle in the courts — while unlikely — being the worst-case scenario.

Sen. Shaheen, a Democrat and former N.H. governor from 1997 to 2003, described the federal grant as a “down payment” on the project when meeting with local leaders late Friday afternoon in Hinsdale.

Shaheen examined the current bridges’ situation with N.H. DOT staff Friday. About half of Hinsdale residents drive over the two bridges connected by an island to get to work across the Connecticut River in Vermont, according to J.B. Mack, the principal planner for the Southwest Region Planning Commission.

The rickety, red-listed double truss bridges have raised concerns for years, and drivers can experience an average wait of 20 minutes during rush hour when there are train crossings on the Brattleboro side.

Once the frigid on-site visit wrapped up, Shaheen made her way over to the Hinsdale Police Department headquarters for a roundtable discussion on the new bridge, with the latest renderings on display.

As she took out her notebook and asked everyone to introduce themselves, Edwin “Smokey” Smith of Hinsdale quipped that he had been at meetings like these for Hinsdale-Brattleboro bridge committees since 1986.

Smith, a Republican state representative for seven terms who now volunteers on various boards, recalled working on the bridge issue and economic development in southwestern New Hampshire with Shaheen when they were both at the Statehouse in the 1990s, initially in her tenure as a state senator and later from Concord’s corner office.

“As Ed knows, some of those same challenges existed when I was governor,” the U.S. senator said.

Several of those gathered around the table described Hinsdale as part of the “forgotten corner” of New Hampshire, a longstanding moniker in the political topography of the Monadnock Region.

advertisement

Mack described how the new bridge could improve the local economy beyond cutting down on traffic wait times for rail crossings.

“Hinsdale and Winchester ... are some of the most economically challenged communities in the state and Cheshire County,” Mack told Shaheen. “So we’ve been really looking forward to this for a long time to bring in new business opportunities and investment opportunities.”

Key to those goals is a plan to rehabilitate the existing double truss bridges to accommodate pedestrians and emergency vehicles, Mack said. Preserving the bridges flanking Hinsdale Island is included in the grant Shaheen announced last month.

Cyclists and hikers would be able to cross the river with ease, and tourists coming up from New York City or down from Montreal could access the potential island park from the nearby Amtrak station, according to Sue Fillion, Brattleboro’s planning services director.

Hiking paths leading to the Pisgah and Monadnock State Parks would also be made more accessible to Brattleboro with the revamped bridges, officials said.

Even for a cynic like Smith, who lamented decades of false promises over a new bridge — which he claims date back to the last hand-drawn bridge markup done by N.H. DOT — the federal grant brings high hopes for the end of what’s become known as “Malfunction Junction,” he said.

“I love the term,” Shaheen chuckled when Smith brought up the congestion during rail crossings toward the end of the roundtable meeting.

“I mean, only because I don’t have to sit in it every day.”

Jake Lahut can be reached at 352-1234, extension 1435, or jlahut@keenesentinel.com. You can follow him on Twitter @JakeLahut.

Ash Street Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted November 19, 2019, by Anonymous

This bridge has been demolished and replaced as part of the ongoing I-93 widening project between Salem and Manchester. The replacement bridge is of the same rigid-frame design as the original but clearly has the more modern appearance to it at the same time.

Hampton River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted November 12, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

According to NHDOT, the previous bridge at this location was called the Mile Long Bridge, and as can be seen in this photo, was timber.

ST - Triple Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted November 5, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Don’t change lanes while crossing :^)

ST - Triple Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted November 4, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

How Neat !

Walnut Grove Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted September 30, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Discovered this bridge noted in an old SIA newsletter, and per Google it appears its still here!

Posted August 22, 2019, by Scott Whitney (sjwhitney [at] comcast [dot] net)

The height of the bridge is 130' over the river. It was the second highest bridge on the Boston & Maine when built. Clinton (MA) viaduct was 133'.

Posted July 27, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just saw this bridge on a show on the Food Network called Restaurant Impossible about the Covered Bridge Farm Table restaurant.The bridge looked to be in great shape after the work that was done on it.The work that was done to the bridge was mentioned on the show.

Posted July 23, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The restaurant is actually named Covered Bridge Farm Table Restaurant.My mistake.

Posted July 23, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Country Cow restaurant is now the Covered Bridge Farm and Table Restaurant.I forgot to mention that and also when anybody visits the covered bridge they can stop at the restaurant.

Posted July 21, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Dana and Kay.

Posted July 21, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

George added a street view you can see Country Cow from

Posted July 20, 2019, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was just watching a show on the Food Network called Restaurant Impossible starring Robert Irvine and during the show the restaurant called the Country Cow they dealt with I happened to see this covered bridge in a lot of the background shots.This show also was filmed during the bridge rehab on 8/20/14.Amazing how beautiful it looks.

Oak Street Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted May 3, 2019, by Erich Adler (erich_a [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge is gone. Demolished earlier this year to be replaced with a beam bridge.

Posted February 6, 2019, by Allan & Mary Lovering (Mlovering [at] maine [dot] rr [dot] com)

Good pictures!Lots of detail pictures for modelers.Looking at photos of the piers and abutments I see concrete extensions to the granite work. Looks like the entire bridge was relatively recently raised about two feet. Probably after the state acquired it from the B&M RR.Can anyone confirm or refute ?

Posted December 30, 2018, by Steve LaBonte (mvjct58 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Know as the Ela Bridge. Ela was also the name of a (wooden) Box Shop near this location.

Posted September 28, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The article said "A"... As in one singular floor beam is bad. That would be an easy replacement. Other than that I see a beautiful structure that needs a paint job. I saw nothing in any of those photos that suggested rampant section loss.

More bureaucratic BS...

Posted September 28, 2018, by Brianna Tarness (briannatarness82 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge indefinitely closed:

http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20180928/gen-sullivan-bri...

WARNING! One of the image renderings in the above article is of a proposed replacement for the General Sullivan Bridge. It is hideously ugly and is a USEB (Ugly Steel Eyesore Bridge).

While the current bridge definitely looks scary and falling apart with all of the rust both above and below the deck, I don’t think that its an irreversible problem. If the structure can no longer carry any traffic due to the extreme deterioration, the trusses should be relocated elsewhere for a non-functional display exhibit.

Sadly, it appears that this bridge may ultimately have the same fate as the Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge up in Maine, where the bridge was allowed to deteriorate after being closed to vehicular traffic and was not maintained, and therefore had to be demolished for safey’s sake. While safety does come first in anything, sometimes I wonder if safety and preservation could go together more frequently...

Posted September 22, 2018, by Brianna Tarness (briannatarness82 [at] gmail [dot] com)

After a long series of negotiations, the town of Windham in conjunction with NHDOT have decided that they are not going to replace the Castle Hill Road Bridge, and therefore the Mammoth Road access to the neighborhoods within will be closed indefinitely.

The primary reason for this is that residents and people affiliated with Windham High School, which is located on the NH-111 side of the road (the road is known as London Bridge Road on that end) were concerned that replacing the bridge and reopening the road would result in a significant increase in traffic using the road as a shortcut/bypass and would therefore end the area’s ability to be a quiet residential neighborhood. There has been a significant increase in the amount of traffic using both Mammoth Road and NH-111 since the closure of the Castle Hill Bridge in 2007, and therefore residents on both ends are concerned about the increase in traffic a reopened bridge could bring.

Reportedly, an historical marker to indicate the location of this bridge prior to collapse is going to be erected, although I have not heard anything more than that.

Moose Brook Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted September 15, 2018, by Will (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

The replicated Moose Brook (using salvaged Rods Nuts & Washers and Cast Iron Angle Blocks) is now the Trout Brook and has been emplaced at the WW&F Rw and will within the coming year carry trains again.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mhd_eOno2aw

Posted July 20, 2018, by Steve LaBonte (mvjct58 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My conclusion at first is this was a pipeline crossing. It may have been a foot bridge. This is about 500 feet downstream to the railroad bridge. I'm not sure if it aligns with Moore's Crossing Road.

Something to consider is that Pine Island Pond was an outflow to Lake Massabesic and there still is a Dam on it and the was a mill on the Cohas Brook just up from on its out fall to the Merrimack River. Massabesic is a drinking water source so was this a fresh water source to the Bedford side of the river?

Lilac Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted June 7, 2018, by Jamie (J [dot] Flanders [at] comcast [dot] net)

$3.3 Million spent here instead of fixing the abysmal traffic flow between East Hooksett and the highway on-ramp. College Park Drive, Main Street, West River Road and Hackett Hill intersections could have all benefitted from $3.3 million in safety improvements.

Baker River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted June 4, 2018, by Steve Lindsey (stevelindsey60 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Update from my earlier post on the NHDOT. Strange but the NHDOT has proposed saving three metal bridges late in the day. The first is the General Sullivan's central span on NH's SeaCoast. This was met with fierce opposition from both the conservative state newspaper and the liberal seacoast newspapers. The other two bridges connect Hinsdale, NH and Brattleboro, Vt which the NHDOT proposed to become access to Island Park once a large span opens up downstream. Here locals from Hinsdale are opposing keeping the two although the local newspapers seem to have ignored the issue editorially.

Posted May 1, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Amanda:

Yes, actually I have told someone to take my photo off Facebook when they were passing it off as their own work. Copyright is copyright. Period.

Posted May 1, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Licensed. You keep using that word but I don't think you know what it means.

You cannot legally post copyrighted photographs on your website without permission or a license from the copyright holder. Full stop. By posting somebody else's photographs on your website, you are setting yourself up for a DMCA takedown notice or a lawsuit. You can either learn this the easy way or the hard way.

Posted May 1, 2018, by Amanda

I DON'T NEED PERMISSION TO USE A PHOTO ON MY PERSONAL WEBSITE!!

You don't go around and tell people that they need to get "permission" in order to post a photo on Facebook, Instagram, or any other social media/blog site.

Again, my website is NOT LICENSED.

Regardless though, how am I supposed to know the real identity of the author when they don't leave an email address or any other contact information?

Posted May 1, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Amanda:

Did you get permission from C. Hanchey to use his photo on your website?

https://bridge-explorer.weebly.com/general-sullivan-bridge.h...

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 22, 2018, by Luke

IMO both are needed, since "destroyed by ice" isn't an official status category (YET. It should be.)

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 22, 2018, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Amanda,

The new page looks good, I would make two other suggestions. 1. Pick one either destroyed by ice or destroyed by flood. 2. Since you have pics of the replacement bridge post a couple labeled current bridge or replacement bridge...

Royce

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Luke

Then it's "Destroyed by flooding" with the "Destroyed by ice" subcategory added, not "preserved", as what's there now is new pedestrian construction, not what was there before being preserved.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Luke

The bridge width negates your claim that it was a former road bridge, though, just like how the machinery height and narrowness of a span negated the Lawrence, MA bridge as being a "railroad bascule".

This replaced a road bridge, and, quite frankly, whatever was there before is probably more interesting than this pseudo-suspension.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Luke

Despite it being blurry, if you compare the bridge width in the 1951 imagery to the bridge width in 1992 imagery, you can see that the current structure is far narrower than what was there in 1951 (Or even the slightly-clearer 1974 imagery.).

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Luke

I mean, Royce and I spent the better part of the past week arguing, and he recommended me in his reply to you.

People can disagree and still be respectful.

It's hard to be respectful when one takes the disagreement far too personally, as you continually have.

We appreciate your contributions, but if you're gonna pull the "time and money" card, both Royce (From the DFW-area, travels all over photographing (Cue Johnny Cash).), Nathan (From Michigan; Runs his own bridge site.), and John (From the MSP-area; Travels around the Midwest, juggling this hobby AND his university studies.) have you beat.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Amanda -

Did you take any measurements of the extant bridge - length, width, vertical clearance? Was there any evidence of a prior bridge on the stone pilings? Do you have a clear photo of the timber stringers or did you take note of their dimensions?

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Amanda,

I appreciate your passion and your enthusiasm. However, please don't tell me that I don't have a right to disagree with you. A number of us disagree and we don't all get along but that doesn't mean we don't have similar goals about bridge preservation and about this site.

Also, if you looked into it, you will find that quite a few here spend significant amounts of their time and/or money pursuing this hobby.

Sincerely,

Art S.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Luke

This is far too narrow to have been a vehicular bridge.

Historicaerials shows a much wider bridge here in previous years.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Amanda

I'm willing to compromise on a lot of things... have you ever noticed that I've deleted many of my bridge pages that you or Luke have said are "wrong" even though I know they weren't wrong? Did you notice that I removed the essay from the Pineground Bridge even though I strongly disagree with your rationale for requesting that I do so?

However, I will not compromise when I personally spent an hour out in the cold weather documenting and inspecting this bridge. I didn't even know it existed until I was poking around on Google Street View one day and noticed the "Bridge Closed" signs on either end of the street (which, BTW indicate that this is indeed a former vehicular bridge - if it was constructed just for pedestrian use, the entire road would've been blocked off except to the one or two people that live there)

As I said, I spent a good hour out in the cold documenting this bridge and determining which elements were functional and which elements were decorations. I never said that the bridge was a wire suspension bridge... however the wires are more than just "wires running through the railing". They are supplementing a small portion of the timber stringer on one end of the bridge. Additionally, the wooden towers are not decorations - they are part of the pier construction.

Honestly, IMHO you have no right to be arguing and criticizing me about a bridge that is not in the NBI that you have not personally visited and I have.

I'm kind of at the end of my rope here. If people don't start being appreciative for the time and money I've spend and continue to spend traveling across the country and documenting bridges, sometimes in the least of urban areas... congratulations.. you just lost a contributor.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Amanda

I'm not wiling to compromise on this one.

I know what I saw and I know my eyes were not deceiving me. This page is staying as it is, unless Mr. Baughn says otherwise.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Amanda,

I'm only responding to your comment about the bridge carrying vehicular traffic. The bridge that originally sat on those abutments may have carried vehicular traffic, as it was considerably wider.

To me, it looks like the structure that is there now is for pedestrians and, maybe, golf carts.

Regards,

Art S.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 21, 2018, by Amanda

This bridge clearly once was used by vehicular traffic - otherwise why would there be vehicular approaches to it with “Bridge Closed” signs on both sides?

Some of what you are saying *might* be valid if this page was based off external sources like many of mine have been, but it’s not valid when I made an ACTUAL SITE VISIT TO THE BRIDGE AND SPENT ABOUT AN HOUR DOCUMENTING IT. Did you even look at the photos I took, which clearly show a decorative wire suspension system?

Regardless if you think my work is sloppy, you don’t just go in and delete half of it without explaining in the update log and/or a comment. You want me to “discuss” your work; you need to discuss mine. How would you feel if I just went to one of your pages, deleted half of the content that you had spent time putting together, and didn’t offer any explanation whatsoever?

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 20, 2018, by Luke

To tack a valid criticism onto that, "damaged by flooding" seems to be superfluous of "destroyed by flooding" IMHO.

North River Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 20, 2018, by Luke

I've been cycling all day.

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 20, 2018, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was able to find the page that says it's open to snowmobiles etc. It's what the page says. I'll try to post the link to it:

http://chichesternh.virtualtownhall.net/Public_Documents/Chi...

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 20, 2018, by Anonymous

Was that a Robert "Frost" poem

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 20, 2018, by Anonymous

Heed the plaintive cry of the intrepid bridgehunter thwarted in their quest to cast their steely eyes upon the beauty that is an historic truss bridge.

In springtime, mud and high water doth impede their progress; summer and autumn are rife with biting insects, woodland creatures, and excessive foliage, making photography truly difficult.

But winter is the harshest season of all; she painteth the earth in fluffy white powder and ice, an hindrance most cruel.

Will no one come forth and vanquish this evil frozen precipitation in timely fashion?

Will no one give succor to this weary wanderer?

Eh, snow happens. Then it melts.

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous
Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

Seems strange you can not navigate the town site.

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Local Resident of Chichester

I brought this up at tonight’s Heritage Commission meeting, mentioning that the wintertime bridge closure despite lack of signage was causing confusion and arguments on BridgeHunter.com... as well as mentioning that someone from BridgeHunter.com reportedly claims the bridge is listed on the town website as open to snowmobiles, yet provided a dead link that gives 404 errors...

I was told that both issues “would be looked into” and that the Hertiage Commission will need to get in touch with the DPW for the first issue and the town webmaster regarding the second issue. The President of the Hertiage Commission has asked that I “inform all users of BridgeHunter.com that the issues are being looked into and that patience is greatly appreciated” (direct quote)

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

this is what the URL looks like for me

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

Or should I say works FINE for me

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

Works fine for me

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

404 page not found on that URL

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

The URL you linked is just the home page for our town website - it doesn't say anything about the bridge.

Regardless, the bridge is NOT open for snowmobiles, and the last few winters, as noted above, signage was posted saying the bridge was not maintained in the winter, though such signage was never installed this year.

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 19, 2018, by Anonymous

Local area resident speaking

Amanda actually is correct. This bridge is closed whenever there is more than ~2 inches of snow on it. This is not a snowmobile trail, but rather essentially is just the sidewalk for the replacement bridge.

Usually there are signs erected at both ends that say “Bridge not maintained in the winter” however for some reason this year they were never put up.

Regardless, I can confirm that currently the bridge is accessible and fully open to pedestrians.

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 18, 2018, by Matt Lohry

As with historic bridges open to the public here in Wisconsin, maintenance typically does not include clearing snow during the winter--there simply is no justification for the cost of clearing snow due to the fact that in winter in Wisconsin, snow is anticipated, and the assumption is that anyone wanting to visit them will properly prepare by putting on appropriate clothing/boots. In fact, many of these bridges are on trails used by snowmobiles, and as such, REQUIRE a substantial snow covering to prevent damage to the decks from snowmobile track studs and ski wear bars.

Pineground Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted April 18, 2018, by Luke

She also added a few on bridges that had similar names so people "wouldn't get them confused", despite them all being in entirely different states: https://bridgehunter.com/ny/richmond/verrazano-narrows/

Posted February 23, 2018, by Luke

What I'm seeing is a dirty I-beam flange with a wooden deck casting a deep shadow.

In any case, your notion that wooden bridges haven't been constructed recently/almost all non-covered examples being gone is false.

Hundreds still exist, and they continue to be built http://www.bec.iastate.edu/timber.cfm

Posted February 23, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

One thing about bridges, you sometimes have to look underneath.

The underside of a bridge is not normally the most attractive part of the structure. It does not generally feature portal bracings, ornamentation, plaques, finials, and other cool stuff. But, by looking underneath, you can often get some good clues about how the bridge functions.

To use concrete bridges as an example, sometimes it's hard to tell a tee beam from a slab from a concrete through girder without looking underneath. I have found that sometimes even the National Bridge Inventory gets the structures confused.

Without looking underneath, my suspicion is this is a wooden bridge with some steel stringers underneath. A very high percentage of old bridges, including wooden bridges, have steel stringers underneath.