Rating:
3 votes

Funkstown Bridge

Photos 

4/2009 photo

Photo taken by Jim Grey

Enlarge

BH Photo #139326

Map 

Description 

Thought to be one of the oldest bridges over Antietam Creek. It was widened in 1931 with the addition of a concrete facade on the west side. The original stone facing remains on the east side. Another interesting note is that electric powered trolleys ran between Funkstown and Hagerstown across this bridge starting in 1901 and ending in 1939. This bridge is part of the Historic National Road. More info: http://bridges.marylandmemories.org/funkstownTurnpike.html

Facts 

Overview
Stone arch bridge over Antietam Creek on US 40 ALT
Location
Funkstown, Washington County, Maryland
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1823; widened 1931 by H.O. Williar Jr. (Chief Engineer); W.C. Hopkins (Bridge Engineer)
Builder
- James Lloyd of Hagerstown, Maryland
Railroads
- Hagerstown & Frederick Railway (H&F)
- Interurban
Design
Stone arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 46.9 ft.
Total length: 130.9 ft.
Deck width: 29.9 ft.
Recognition
Eligible for the National Register of Historic Places
Also called
Funkstown Turnpike Bridge
Antietam Creek Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.61244, -77.71012   (decimal degrees)
39°36'45" N, 77°42'36" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/267346/4388253 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Funkstown
Inventory number
BH 19647 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 01/2016)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Appraisal: Functionally obsolete
Sufficiency rating: 65.6 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2009)
6,082

Update Log 

  • January 10, 2016: Updated by Luke: Added categories "Interurban", "Railroad", "Rail-and-Road", "National Road"
  • November 7, 2010: Updated by Jodi Christman: Added information and corrected various data (e.g., primary name, date of widening)

Sources 

Comments 

Antietam Creek Bridge
Posted April 26, 2009, by Jim Grey (mobilene [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is stone on one side, concrete on the other -- the concrete side was added in the 1930s "rehab," the actual goal of which was to widen the bridge. I didn't know about the stone side when I took this photo, or I'd've gone around to photograph that side too!

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.