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Charles River Dam Bridge

Photos 

Historical Photo of Original 1910 Bridge

Historical 1930 Photo showing bridge in partially raised position.

Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)

Enlarge

BH Photo #264122

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Bascule bridge over Charles River on MA 28 in Boston
Location
Cambridge, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and Middlesex County, Massachusetts
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
History
Built 1910 as a pair of parallel single leaf bascules; entire superstructure and mechanics demolished and replaced in 1962 with double-leaf bascule; rehabilitated 1992; entire superstructure replaced 2010-2011 with fixed trunnion bascule.
Design
Double leaf bascule with variable-depth deck plate girder superstructure
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 63.0 ft.
Total length: 82.0 ft.
Deck width: 65.0 ft.
Also called
Craigie Dam Bridge
Charles River Bridge
Craigie Bridge
Science Museum Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+42.36716, -71.06914   (decimal degrees)
42°22'02" N, 71°04'09" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
19/329623/4692617 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Boston South
Inventory numbers
MA B16013 (Massachusetts bridge number)
BH 19445 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • November 30, 2015: New Street View added by Douglas Butler
  • August 30, 2013: New Street View added by Douglas Butler
  • August 22, 2013: New photos from Douglas Butler
  • August 21, 2013: Updated by Nathan Holth: Corrected and expanded design details. Bridge has been demolished and replaced.

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

Charles River Bridge
Posted August 21, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge has an unusual history. I updated the page so hopefully it reduces the confusion. It was originally a 1910 single leaf bascule, replaced in 1962 with a double leaf bascule (one of the smallest double leaf bascules I have ever seen) and again demolished and replaced in 2010. As such, the bridge today is modern and has no historic significance.