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Posted May 16, 2022, by Dan (bridgehunter [at] danwray [dot] com)

Found this pic on waybackmachine from the old no longer available kaintuckeean article. Claims to have been from a flood in 2010 showing just the top of the bridge above water.

Posted May 8, 2022, by Mark Yurina (markyurina [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited the bridge today. After looking at August of 2021's documentation, progress on the replacement span seems to be crawling. Hopefully this bridge will see another full summer. On a Sunday evening, I had free range of the area.

Posted May 7, 2022, by Mark Yurina (markyurina [at] gmail [dot] com)

Saw this little beauty yesterday. According to a nearby landowner, the state decided to raise the height of the bridge. It's completely rehabilitated.

Posted April 24, 2022, by Don Morrison

judging by the ROW, looks like Mobile & Ohio RR.

"Casey Jones you better watch your speed

Trouble ahead, trouble behind

And you know that notion just crossed my mind."

-Workingman's Dead/The Grateful Dead

Posted April 18, 2022, by Dewey (coleslaw70 [at] aim [dot] com)

Pic 32 shows what appears to be a pulley system built onto the bridge. What would that be used for?

Posted April 10, 2022, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Mind if I use your picture for a mystery bridge article? JS

Posted April 4, 2022, by Will (will [dot] aubrey [at] gmail [dot] com )

Here is a picture of the bridge.

Posted March 28, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

How brittle was the metal that a tree could cause the destruction? Of course, the tree could have hit the right part on the span, causing a complete failure.

Posted March 28, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Based on the results, and according to the article, an entire tree fell on it. Must have used a low-budget firm.

Posted March 21, 2022, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] outlook [dot] com)

Tracks have been removed up to the junction point with the mainline.

Posted February 24, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Over a year later, the view is the same. I guess nobody had better hold their breath waiting on this. But what's the hurry? The state has so many of them left...

Posted February 18, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

A website visitor contacted me asking about a bridge located here that washed away in the 1930s. I have added this mystery bridge in the hopes someone might know more and add info to this page/forum.

Posted February 18, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

November 1999.

Posted February 18, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

August 2001. It's hard to tell in the photos, but this poor thing was looking rough.

Posted February 18, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

August 2001, from better days. Unfortunately, there is indeed the dreaded UCEB here now.

Posted February 18, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

August 2001. By this time, nobody was paying attention to the "barricades" anymore.

Posted February 17, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It turns out this IS in fact an Ore Conveyor, sadly it may be gone either already or soon as in checking this structure I learned that they just imploded a historic blast furnace on the site as the steel mill is totally shut down. You can watch history being destroyed here: https://www.wsaz.com/2022/02/08/demolition-idle-ak-steel-sit...

Bridges keep me busy enough that I have never had time to be involved with the work of groups like SIA that advocate for the preservation of structures like old steel mills, but that said this is still a devastating loss of history for anyone with an appreciation of iron and steel history. These massive old blast furnaces are not built anymore, as most new steel mills use electric arc furnaces.

For reasons which elude me (given the outdated technology) these old steel mill companies that are going out of business or declining all guard their secrets like they are running Area 51 and tours became nearly impossible after 9-11.

Here is an AK Steel documentary I am listing because that is who operated this mill:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9AMbKpeJRoU

But the best documentary I have ever seen by far is this British documentary because it dates to 1945 back before all the OSHA safety stuff we have today and despite the age of the documentary it was filmed in full color. You can see the people who made the steel used to build the bridges that are demolished without a second thought today were really risking their lives to produce the steel in these bridges! Notice how close they were to molten steel with no protection.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6quaWHDohjw

Posted February 16, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Rick,

Now that you mention it, it does seem like the bridge might be somewhat bent from the flood.

I haven't found any other truss bridges with this same design of portal bracing, but I'll keep my eyes open. I think too that 1925 might have been either an NBI default date or a relocation date (although it was actually Nathan that input that information). It wasn't uncommon for late 19th and early 20th century trusses to be relocated to little back roads after they had outlived their usefulness on busier routes, since their pinned construction allowed them to be taken apart and reassembled relatively easily.

Posted February 15, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

In regard to your notations on the page, I suppose it wouldn't be all that far from the realm of possibility this was a relocation considering the rural area.

Posted February 15, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

I'm sure I noticed it at the time and have just forgotten, but does it seem there is a decent bow to the right on that first pic? Looks like this one must have taken a good deal of force also.

Posted February 15, 2022, by Paul Plassman

To me, the portal bracing doesn't look like the most unusual design I've ever seen, but it doesn't look standard either, what with the slight arch in the lower beam....which would point to an older construction date.

I'll poke around Bridgehunter a bit and see if I can find another bridge with similar portals....that might give us a ballpark estimate as to the age of this bridge.

And of course, more pictures would always prove of interest....I only wish I had been alive and taking pictures in my area of lower Michigan some 30-40 years ago when a lot of old truss bridges were being removed!

Posted February 15, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

My friend, I will leave that to your judgement. That is beyond my expertise, I am unable to guess a bridge's age from its appearance. But I am certain the photos I posted belong to this location, seeing the layout of the bypass on HA verified it for me. I can't help with the date, but I see no harm in crediting these photos with this bridge.

I have more pics that are older, perhaps I photographed a date on them if the bridge has any type of marker.

Posted February 15, 2022, by Paul Plassman

I think we were both posting at about the same time, Rick!

You think we should remove the 1925 date altogether as it is obviously misleading? I am not sure of the exact time frame of this bridge but it's clearly at least a decade older than the stated date.

Posted February 15, 2022, by Keith Todd (keith [dot] todd [at] ky [dot] gov)

This bridge has been undergoing a rehab. It had been closed for a time, but reopened Feb. 15, 2022. More work planned.

Updates are available a www.facebook.com/kytcdistrict10. Additional below if it fits...

KY 52 Kentucky River bridge in Estill County reopens

Second closure planned for later this year to complete repairs, painting of iconic span

JACKSON, Ky. Ė The bridge carrying KY 52 and KY 89 over the Kentucky River and the CSX Transportation railroad line in Estill County, closed since Nov. 29, has been temporarily reopened to traffic.

The bridge had been closed as part of a multi-phase project to repair joints, restore the deck, and repaint the metal truss of the span that serves as an iconic signature gateway to downtown Irvine.

The closure was only expected to last through December, but inclement weather delayed the project. The contractor was unable to complete the deck restoration project, and it will now be done in conjunction with the upcoming painting.

Once the painting and deck work begins, the bridge will once again be closed and traffic will be required to use the KY 499 (Joseph Proctor Memorial Bypass) bridge as a detour route. No date has yet been set for the second closure. It is anticipated that once work begins, the bridge will need to be closed for around three months. Repairs to the bridge's railing will also be made during the second closure.

The bridge was last painted in 1987, before the new KY 499 bridge was built in 2000. That work resulted in lengthy traffic backups on both sides of the river. The presence of the new bridge and bypass will alleviate those concerns, enabling a full closure of the truss bridge to expedite repairs. The bridge is located on KY 52 between milepoints 7.4 and 7.5 at the south end of Main Street in Irvine. KY 89 traffic is also routed on the span. It was built in 1940 and carries nearly 12,000 vehicles per day.

Posted February 14, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

March 1997.

Posted February 14, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Sorry, I did not see your post when I put mine up.

I agree with you, as I posted earlier, I believe HA confirms this to be the right bridge for my pics. The '04 and '06 images are the bypass I photographed. Now where are those pictures... :)

Posted February 14, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan,

After looking at HA and matching it with the map location for this bridge, I believe these pics are the bridge for this location. In looking at the 2004 and 2006 images on HA, this totally jives with what occurred there with the road layout and bypass, with the new bridge being much bigger than the old crossing.

Posted February 14, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Via historic aerials, it certainly looks like the Licking River site (the curves in the road on the south side of the bridge look the same, and you can see the two barns that show up in the background of one of the photos, one of which is still there).

Perhaps 1925 is another NBI "guess date"?

Posted February 14, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan,

I have been back to the site a few times, there is now a high rise bridge and you can barely pick out where the old one was. The location on this map jives with where we were at, but without returning it would be difficult to know how far down we were. Perhaps this could be the crossing of Camp Creek, a little further to the north of this site? It doesn't look like it would be a very big crossing, but this is obviously not a very big bridge either.

I suppose this makes a great excuse for another field trip :)

Posted February 14, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If this is the correct bridge, then the 1925 construction date is incorrect (too new).

Posted February 14, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

March 1997, immediate aftermath of the flood.

Posted February 13, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks Paul! as someone who lives in the Dallas Fort Worth area i find it even more impressive as we dont have bridges like those. all we have are two phony suspension bridges by Santiago Calatrava which are interesting looking but they are purely decorative as we have no need for major architectural feats to cross a giant river like the Mississippi or the Ohio rivers. we have the Houston Viaduct that is extremely significant for being the longest (or at least one of the longest) concrete bridge in the world during its construction. Dallas almost became a port city when it tried to dig the trinity river into a navigable river for large ships. Traces of old dams can still be seen scattered along the trinity river (one just north of S Beltline Road Trinity River Bridge)

Posted February 12, 2022, by Paul Plassman

You'd think the demolition guy's comment about it being so heavily built would have made somebody think a little. Although I'm guessing the reason for replacement here wasn't so much structural deficiency as width...they still could've reused this for a one-way couplet or pedestrian bridge though.

Posted February 12, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

From the Cincinnati Post and the Cincinnati Enquirer. I'm certainly thrilled the onlookers cheered, it was definitely a moment to be proud of.

Posted February 12, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

From July of 2001.

Posted February 11, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Bambi,

That view from the roadway is a great photo! The thing I always liked about the Simon Kenton is the relatively narrow width of the roadway makes the towers look extremely tall, giving the illusion of a gigantic bridge. As well, the x-bracing on the towers is strikingly similar to some of the world's biggest suspension bridges, such as Japan's Akashi Kaikyo, enhancing the impression.

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

you are absolutely correct on both! anything from October 4th and September 18th 2019 are from a 17 day road trip i did for a music festival called Lost Lands in Ohio. 7 days from Dallas to Pittsburgh, 5 days at the festival, and 5 days coming back. i main went bridge hunting but i also checked some scenic routs and a couple towns and cities. i bought my Sony A7Rii in december 2018 and was exited to use it for my road trip/vacation. my version of a vacation is living in my car for days exploring the country and sleeping at rest stops

Posted February 10, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bambi,

The picture you posted is of downtown Maysville, just for reference. You certainly do get around!

Posted February 10, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

The Westinghouse Bridge in Pittsburgh is about the only one I have seen that demonstrates the importance of Westinghouse to the city and to the business community in general.

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

i visited this bridge October 1st of 2019 just before they closed it for repairs. i need to make a canvas out of this picture this bridge as its just gorgeous.

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

thats how i feel about all bridges named after people. so few explain who they really were or what they did

Posted February 10, 2022, by Brandon Cooper

I agree. A note of who William Harsha was would have been cool.

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

these bridges would look a lot better (still amazing to someone from Texas) if it has some art deco elements added to the bridge combined with modern colored lighting emphasizing the detail. adding some bling something like the Cincinnati Roe"bling" Bridge would also be amazing.

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Added Builder Information Based on Plaque

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

i ordered a 4ft by 3ft Canvas of a picture (#171 on this page) i took of this bridge a couple years back

Posted February 10, 2022, by Bambi Sharkoman (jesseberube5 [at] gmail [dot] com)

JP that looks really nice. dont know if i like yours better artificial lighting or mine with star light

Posted February 8, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

An absolute beauty built by one of my hometown firms! I hope to get down that way in the near future to see it in person.

...And I don't even mind the UK Blue! 😆

Posted February 8, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Just received some good news from Richard Hines that the town of Edmonton has agreed to move this bridge to a city park.

Posted February 8, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A little more detailed view of the flood damage circa 1999.

Posted February 8, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Shortly after restoration.

Posted February 8, 2022, by Paul Plassman

It does kind of have the same overall appearance as Kellogg. And now that I look at it, it IS narrower than the typical two-lane width...definitely looks like it's appreciated by the community despite that!

Posted February 8, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its also fairly narrow for its age, which makes the members look heavier I think.

Posted February 8, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Does kind of remind you of a junior version of Kellogg Avenue, doesn't it?

Posted February 8, 2022, by Paul Plassman

WOW!! Is it just me, or is this an unusually massive and heavy-duty beauty of a Pennsylvania truss? It looks like it was built to withstand anything!

Posted February 5, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The scene in the aftermath of the '97 floods.

Posted February 4, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I think this might be this bridge. This is from '98, the bridge was "blocked" from '97 flood damage. The map jives with where we were, several miles down Parina Pike.

Posted February 2, 2022, by Paul Plassman

I suspected that 192' was the cantilever arm length as well. A similar scenario that I've noticed here and there is when the total length of a continuous or cantilever truss is reported as the span length. I think there was a bridge in Tennessee that used to be reported that way until somebody fixed it a few years back.

Posted February 2, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Because the existing piers were reused, the span should be the same for all three bridges: 448 feet. Interestingly, 192 feet is the distance between a pier expansion joint and another expansion joint at the center of the span of the present bridge. Not sure of the exact design details of the 1946 bridge maybe if it was a cantilever truss without suspended span, they were for some reason measuring the length of each cantilever arm. I encounter a similar problem with swing bridges. Swing Bridge Spans should be measured from fixed pier to fixed pier, but many NBI entries measure from swing pier to fixed pier, although this seems like a "span" it is not the proper way to measure a swing truss span. Nor should cantilever trusses be measured by each arm, but would not be surprised to see it happen.

Posted February 2, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Weird...not sure why the NBI says this bridge had a 192' main span. Pretty sure this was similar to its successors which would mean a main 448' span.

Then again, it's the NBI...and they seem to have two identical data sheets for the 1946 and the 1963 bridges each as well.

Posted February 2, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Not sure on builder for the 1963 span, unfortunately the Engineering News Record online scans cut off at 1961 as thats one possible source for the builder.

Posted February 2, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Nathan,

When you were researching this crossing, did you come across any information on the builder of the 1963 span? I have been looking and so far have not come up with anything.

Posted February 1, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Nathan,

Done.

https://bridgehunter.com/ky/fayette/bh96182/

https://bridgehunter.com/ky/fayette/bh96183/

It appears that photo 9 on the 1998 bridge page is the only one that needs to be moved, to BH 96182.

Posted February 1, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I have further researched this bridge. The bridge seen today has a superstructure that is 100% from 1998, and it sits on a substructure that is a merged combination of three generations of previous bridges, 1946, 1963, and 1998. As such the bridge seen today was not built by Mount Vernon Bridge Company. I don't have the time but if someone wants to split these pages I would move the photos around as needed.

Posted January 27, 2022, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The last time that I drove through here (2018), this bridge was still open to traffic. It has since been replaced and demolished.

Posted January 24, 2022, by Melissa Jurgensen (Mjurgensen [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge is now closed to traffic and is to be replaced very soon.

Posted December 31, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Thanks Tony, appreciate the input on the age too, that was my feeling as well. I am not very familiar with Champion, I haven't visited as many of their spans as I would like.

Posted December 31, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I added the information including builder and truss type. Changed the build date to ca. 1890's as I feel this corresponds with other Champion BC spans I have seen from that timeframe.

Posted December 30, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I linked this page to its previous location while adding this bridge to my own website. If someone wants to take the time to update and clean up this page with info from the previous location, feel free. Also, I do not agree with the 1919-1920 construction dates floating around for this pin connected truss with an 11.5 foot roadway and highly unusual non-standard built-up verticals.

Posted December 28, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It looks to be close enough to the road to be accessible... especially at this time of year. Might have to contact the landowner if it's marked as "No Trespassing".

Posted December 28, 2021, by Gary Stewart (garydixie1 [at] gmail [dot] com )

Can you still get to the bridge and visit this sight ?

Posted December 11, 2021, by Luis (luissanlop36 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

No, it isn't. The bridge featured in "The Road" (John Hillcoat, 2009) is the Rubles Run Bridge, carrying the Mon-Fayette Expressway in Monongalia County, West Virginia:

https://bridgereports.com/1666475

Posted December 10, 2021, by Ryan (forthetollferry [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is this where that bridge scene in The Road was filmed?

Posted December 5, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It is indeed Douglas! I didn't think so at first until I realized that one span was a Pennsylvania truss and the other was a Parker. I added the close-up image to the main page. Thanks for sharing it!

Posted December 5, 2021, by Douglas Hedrick (doug1349 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I think I have a real photo postcard of this bridge being built. Card is postmarked Prestonsburg and looks similar to the Toll Bridge postcard on your site.

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted November 15, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

That seems reasonable, I added a note to the page (and to my website too, which had always listed it as being in two states also).

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted November 15, 2021, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I always think of it as Evansville. So, as a Hoosier, I say Indiana and Kentucky.

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted November 15, 2021, by Paul Plassman

I agree with Melissa. Even if it isn't technically correct, I'm sure a lot of people (myself included) think of this bridge as a bi-state structure since the Ohio River is uniformly known as the dividing line between the states, and that way anyone trying to find this bridge on Bridgehunter via the Indiana map will still be able to find it. In the interest of accuracy, perhaps a note could be added to the description about this bridge actually being in Indiana.

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted November 15, 2021, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nathan, as a resident of the Tri-State area (IL, IN, KY) I believe it should be jointly listed with Indiana as it is.

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted November 15, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge is not located in Indiana despite joint maintenance. The state line is 1.5 miles north of this bridge and even the approach spans do not reach Indiana. That said, the bridge does have an entry in the Indiana NBI. Also many people may assume part of the bridge is in Indiana. Should the page be edited for geographic accuracy (remove Indiana) or not?

Posted November 12, 2021, by Logan (logangarrison [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any idea on the history of this bridge? I'm doing a project on the different sites along the Elkhorn Creek.

Posted November 12, 2021, by Logan (logangarrison [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any idea on the history of this bridge? I'm doing a project on the different sites along the Elkhorn Creek.

Posted November 12, 2021, by Logan (logangarrison [at] gmail [dot] com)

Any idea on the history of this bridge? I'm doing a project on the different sites along the Elkhorn Creek.

Posted November 10, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This news article indicates this bridge is to be rehabilitated: https://www.nkytribune.com/2021/11/historic-truss-bridge-on-...

Posted November 3, 2021, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] outlook [dot] com)

A c. 1954 topo shows this as being KY Route 471, although it is an older route of US 25W. It was bypassed in 1947.

A c. 1937 state map confirms the routing. I am curious about anything prior to that.

Posted October 31, 2021, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good article about the bridge and its monster. Contains great photos, including one of a train crossing the bridge, and another is a scary artist's conception of the monster. (This is, after all, being posted on Halloween.)

https://darkfringeradio.com/2021/09/10/some-locals-swear-the...

Posted October 25, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

$777,000 is a ridiculous amount of money to spend to replace a bridge with a slab of concrete for pedestrians only.

https://www.rcnky.com/articles/2021/10/25/new-pedestrian-bri...

Next time call Bach Steel and get a beautiful historic bridge moved and restored. Doubt it would cost more.

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted September 29, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The Final Environmental Impact Statement is out and as near as I can tell the older and more historic/significant northbound US-41 Bridge will be rehabilitated with the newer southbound bridge being demolished. While keeping both bridges would be nice, it is in either case a welcome decision that they find the older bridge worth keeping. 1930s (or older) cantilever truss bridges are almost gone over big rivers, with so few being preserved. https://i69ohiorivercrossing.com/feis-rod/

Posted September 17, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Correction, Massillon used this portal design from mid 1883 till 1885 (others have this style and an 1885 plaque). So 1885 is a reasonable possibility for this one.

Posted September 17, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

This bridge superstructure is listed as ca. 1885. It would be nice to confirm the date as the portal style was used in late 1883 and 1884. It would be nice to confirm if the portal bracing was also used in 1885.

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted September 4, 2021, by Tom Hoffman

The state believes traffic will be greatly reduced on the US 41 twin bridges once the new I69 bridge is complete. I too think both bridges should still stand because they've been a very iconic site, and traffic may not stay reduced as much.

Posted September 4, 2021, by Tom Hoffman

Yes, at least its not a UCEB. I'd rather see a modern through truss bridge be built to replace a UCEB from the 60s, 70s, or built on a brand new road. Rather see that than to replace a demolished historic through truss.

Posted September 3, 2021, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

They are now in the process of building a new bridge right next to it. All I can say is at least the replacement isnít an ucb

Twin Bridges (Kentucky)
Posted September 3, 2021, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Based on the amount of traffic I have seen there, I donít rightly see how they can go back down to two lanes. Seems pretty inept on the stateís part

Posted September 2, 2021, by Jacob (jacobreyn [at] aol [dot] com)

I own half of the property that this tunnel is located on; this is NOT public property and it is NOT open to pedestrians. I have posted no trespassing signs, and do not wish for anyone to access this property. The tunnel is old and the land is very hazardous. It is not safe to be on or around this property.

Posted September 1, 2021, by Damon McGaha

With all respect, I am pretty certain that the caption of photo #4 (Ben Tate-August-2013 " As seen from Cumberland River US 62 Bridge") should read "....US 62 Tennessee River Bridge"

Maybe someone could correct the caption.

Posted August 26, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yikes!

Posted August 26, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Repairs on this bridge have begun. While the decision to repair this bridge rather than demolish it is to be applauded, the work is not what a bridge historian would call "restoration" indeed one of the most bizarre repairs I have ever seen on a bridge, the use of adjustable house beam jacks for vertical members, is being continued as part of this repair. The old jacks had cracked, suggesting the use of residential house support jacks may not be suited to bridge construction. Additionally, the work was only available to DOT prequalified contractors, no special provisions for the work to be done by experts in historic bridge restoration such as Bach Steel were included.

https://www.bgdailynews.com/news/work-begins-on-historic-old...

Posted August 20, 2021, by Joshua Denny (jmdenny004 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My great-grandfather, Charles Franklin Denny, is the fireman pictured hanging out of the engine window. The picture was taken my Lt. M. H. Linn of the Special Services and Freight Claims Department. It was featured in the first issue of the Southern Railroadís Ties Magazine, March 1947. Charles Denny was killed on Okinawa in June, 1945. His father was the night chief dispatcher on the CNO and TP in Somerset for Southern.

Posted August 9, 2021, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

I try to go see it every time I travel to Henderson. It is a very serene place, it is always sad to lose such integral pieces of local history with little regard. The view of the new bridge next to the old is very intriguing though. Itís nice that they are using a modern Warren truss variant rather than just a boring slab of concrete. Indeed, the Evansville area is losing too many treasures with this coupled with the pigeon creek US 41 bridge and the eventual destruction of one of the US 41 Ohio River Twin Bridges.

Posted July 23, 2021, by Bradley Wilder

That is a sign for the entrance to the Kentucky Utilties Tyrone Generating Station, which was on the river just downstream. It was closed in recent years and demolished a couple of years before the streetview picture was taken. I guess they forgot to take the sign.