Rating:
7 votes

Third Street Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Dale Travis

Enlarge

BH Photo #132261

Description 

Originally built between 1870-1880 to serve a railroad in Tennessee, purchased and installed by the city of Delavan in 1907.

Facts 

Overview
Pony truss bridge over City Park on Third Street in Delavan
Location
Delavan, Tazewell County, Illinois
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built Ca. 1880 as a railroad bridge, moved here 1907
Builder
- Kellogg Bridge Co. of Buffalo, New York
Railroad
- Chicago & Alton Railroad (C&A)
Design
Double-intersection Warren pony truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 64.0 ft.
Total length: 79.0 ft.
Deck width: 17.3 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on May 20, 1999
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.37361, -89.54444   (decimal degrees)
40°22'25" N, 89°32'40" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/283983/4472333 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Delavan South
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
125
Inventory numbers
IL 090-9912 (Illinois bridge number)
NRHP 99000586 (National Register of Historic Places reference number)
BH 15691 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of December 2016)
Overall condition: Good
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 79.7 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • April 13, 2017: New photos from John Marvig
  • April 20, 2016: New photos from Steve Conro
  • November 7, 2015: Updated by John Marvig: bridge was relocated from TN
  • May 9, 2010: New photos from Robert Stephenson
  • July 5, 2008: Updated by Anthony Dillon: changed status

Sources 

Comments 

Third Street Bridge
Posted July 18, 2021, by Luke

The source for the TN link was a "lifelong resident". So I think we've got another case of Rose-Tinted-Pulleditouttamybutt-Talltaleitis

Third Street Bridge
Posted July 18, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Kellogg was out of business sometime in 1881, selling the plant to Central Bridge; which later became part of Union Bridge Company. This plant remained open until the early 1890s. I believe this bridge may date to the 1870s, and I seriously doubt the Tennessee detail. Three of the five confirmed bridges by this company were on the Chicago & Alton; and the two confirmed original locations were on the Roodhouse, IL to Kansas City line . I suspect this bridge was eventually replaced by a through girder somewhere on the Kansas City line.