Rating:
8 votes

Gedney Lake Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by Luke

View this photo on Flickr

BH Photo #243421

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over Gedney Lake on Former alignment of 231st Street
Location
Muscatine County, Iowa
Status
Open to Pedestrians
History
Built 1930
Builders
- A.F. Johnson of Lockridge, Iowa (Contractor)
- Bethlehem Steel Co. of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
- Frederick Paul Gerhart Halbfass of La Porte City, Iowa (County Engineer)
- Iowa State Highway Commission of Ames, Iowa (Design)
- Otto Wendling of Muscatine, Iowa
Design
This bridge is a riveted Pratt through truss bridge, built in a way that the first three panels have diagonal beams slanting toward the other shore and the last one has a diagonal beam slanting in the other direction- a unique design never seen before. Portal bracing is A-frame and strut lacing is V-shaped with 45 heel bracing.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 108.0 ft.
Also called
Fishing Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.40137, -91.31081   (decimal degrees)
41°24'05" N, 91°18'39" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
15/641201/4584690 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Nichols
Inventory number
BH 49010 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • June 6, 2019: New photo from Luke
  • January 24, 2019: Updated by Luke: Added build date
  • July 10, 2013: Updated by Luke Harden: Added image of steel fabricator embossing
  • November 21, 2012: Photo imported by Luke Harden
  • November 13, 2012: Updated by Luke Harden: Updated road.
  • October 30, 2012: New Street View added by Luke Harden
  • July 6, 2012: Updated by Luke Harden: Added category "A-frame portal"
  • May 25, 2012: Photo imported by Luke Harden
  • January 12, 2012: New photos from Luke Harden
  • September 13, 2011: Updated by Jason Smith: This is a very unique Pratt through truss bridge with riveted connections.
  • September 13, 2011: New photos from Luke Harden
  • June 30, 2011: Added by Luke Harden

Sources 

Comments 

Gedney Lake Bridge
Posted September 14, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I highly doubt that this span was built "unbalanced" like this.

It was likely shortened by those 2 panels being removed, possibly due to some sort of damaged incurred on that end.

Definitely has a unique look now.