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Posted July 30, 2021, by John Bernhisel (Johnmbernhisel [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted July 30, 2021, by Luke

It seems to match https://bridgehunter.com/mo/boone/bh45490/ which is allegedly from 1899.

Posted July 30, 2021, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

OK, has been corrected.

Posted July 30, 2021, by Dan Doss (dandoss56 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The photo of the bridge showing the river below was taken on April 5, 1908, by Charles McMurray of Georgetown.

The caption under the original picture in the album that it came out of, states "New Bridge" over South Gabriel, looking North--April 5,1908.

If interested in further info contact Williamson County Historical Commission.

Posted July 30, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would be willing to guess this one also is slightly older than 1900.

Posted July 30, 2021, by Paul

The postcard photo presented here does not show the Clinton Street Bridge. Though it is a similar design, the postcard shows the bridge which stood from 1938 to 1991 on Second Street over the Auglaize River, which was known as the Fort Winchester Bridge. The Clinton Street crossing was known as the Fort Defiance Bridge.

Memorial Bridgehunting Tour on BHC Facebook and Instagram beginning August 1
Posted July 30, 2021, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Hi there! Reminder that beginning August 1 and lasting through September, we will be doing a social media tribute honoring the late James Baughn. The Chronicles’ facebook pages will be cleared so that you can post your best bridge photos honoring the webmaster who created the world’s largest bridge database. Information on how you can participate can be found here:

https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2021/06/08/mem...

Looking forward to seeing your gallery of bridge photos on the Chronicles’ facebook pages. You may also post your bridge gallery onto the Chronicles’ Instagram page. Simply post and tag the Chronicles’ name. The address can be found here:

https://www.instagram.com/bridgehunters_chronicles17/

All news stories will continue to be made available but only through the Chronicles’ wordpress website. Subscribe to the Chronicles to follow up on the news and other bridge stories.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Sold. To Washington County and is expected to be relocated to Lake Elmo Park Preserve to be reused as a pedestrian and bike bridge. A win-win for both counties! :-D Link: https://www.nujournal.com/opinion/2021/07/29/one-countys-jun...

Posted July 29, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Luke,

When working with Texas, don't even bother with the National Archive (or whatever you were searching in). Both the Marker text and National Register Nomination are available in ATLAS (as are all Texas nominations). https://atlas.thc.state.tx.us/

I am attaching the nomination form, and I posted the Marker Text as an essay.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 8,752,135 bytes)

Posted July 29, 2021, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

17-year update....bridge still extant as of today 7/29/21....traffic count in 2016 of 100 car/day is a bit lofty today, saw 1 house on this highway-side very, very, rough road, glad it's extant, but county coffers build up, this 96 year-old beaut might be a goner, but cant imagine why they'd bother

Posted July 29, 2021, by City Dweller (saichad96 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is under construction and it looks to be a net new build. Not sure where to get updates on when the project will be completed.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Luke

Frustratingly, this bridge is on the NRHP, but the documents have yet to be digitized.

And unlike the HAER/LoC, which sometimes lists builders in search tags on the side, the NR does no such helpful thing.

Also, irony of ironies: the Texas Landmarks plaque they put at the bridge got stolen, much like the actual builder plaque seems to have been stolen/broken.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

There are 2 possibilities...

*The 1833 date refers to the substructure, which would likely mean a covered bridge existed there prior to the deck truss being built. It's not unrealistic that a person supposedly "in the know" would give the historic date of the crossing.

*It's a typo. I have numerous postcards in my collection that posess them. Despite not having computers back then to muck things up people still made mistakes.

My vote is on the latter. Makes me wonder if the NBI existed back then.😆

Posted July 29, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It is not believable as bridges of this type did not yet exist. 1883 seems more likely.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Postcard has built date of 1833..is this believable?

Posted July 29, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Historic Resource Survey Form attached.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 5,530,204 bytes)

Elk Creek Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted July 29, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The bridge shown in this postcard looks like one of Will Dickinson's early 20th century curved t-beam bridges. It may have dated to ca. 1910. Compare to this: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=p...

The bridge at this location today appears to be a replacement steel stringer and they may have placed railing on this stringer bridge to try to mimic the Will Dickinson bridge as it doesn't look like a standard Pennsylvania railing to me.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Clay,

Thanks, I have corrected the pages. It seems someone incorrectly assumed when the new bridge was built the old bridge was demolished. If you get photos of these bridges please consider contributing them to the website as we do not have any photos of them currently!

Posted July 29, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I agree... The wrecked bridge is clearly a Whipple truss, while the postcard is of a Pratt.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Luke

Postcard is not the same bridge

Posted July 29, 2021, by Clay Stromberger (cstromberger [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hello -- This bridge and the one on 443 are still standing, according to a local turf grass farm foreman. And they're both still visible on Google Maps. No longer in use. Perhaps the "no longer exists" designation is in error? Traveling out there this weekend to look for them.

Posted July 29, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the detective work on this one Luke! There were a few Lattice trusses that turned up yesterday which had been in Central New York. I wonder if perhaps this was Horseheads "truss of choice" for a time.

re: Fun Fact About Postcards
Posted July 28, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

That's why I prefer old paintings. The image may be 'impressionistic' but usually the colors are a pretty good interpretation.

That said, while the colorization of black & white images may or may not be accurate, the black and white images can be quite revealing if you know how the film registers each color.

Also, although not common, color photography has been around since the mid 1800s. Though, think needle in a haystack regarding finding one.

There are a couple of other reliable ways to figure out old colors but that's getting a bit far from the spirit of your post.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

How do you feel about Nelson & Buchanan Co. or Penn Bridge Works (T.B. White & Sons - predecessor Penn Bridge Co.)?

While you are not totally wrong, there's more to the story.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Jeremy (heltonj03 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Was placed at this location approximately 2010. Was originally south of Plattsburg on original route of Springtown Road across Little Platte River.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Jeremy (heltonj03 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Has been replaced as of 2021

Posted July 28, 2021, by Luke

Yeah it's def Phoenix.

I'm still of the controversial opinion that if Dean & Westbrook were just agents for Phoenix and never fabricated a bridge that they should be marked as such.

e.g. Milo Adams in Iowa for King

Posted July 28, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I think it just might be!

Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

A bit fuzzy and obstructed, but could this be a Phoenix/Dean & Westbrook?

RE: Fun Fact About Postcards
Posted July 28, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've been collecting historic postcards for a couple years now and have done a little research on them. I actually hadn't heard about how the colorization process was completed, but it makes sense that they likely wouldn't have had detailed directive on the colors to use. American companies like Curteich of Chicago would greatly diminish the postcard trade with Germany, and the start of WW1 likely sealed the deal.

This postcard shows the Nickel Plate "Twins" over the St. Mary's River in Ft. Wayne,IN. The one in front was mainly used for passenger trains and was removed. The one in the rear remains and is now used by Norfolk Southern.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Warren Jenkins (wwjenkins77 [at] verizon [dot] net)

It's possible this tunnel was rebuilt when concrete construction became popular on the WMRY (pre WW1). The original alignment was bypassed c.1938, when the current MD 550 was rerouted through the underpass by the Sabillasville P.O., and westward into Highfield/Cascade.

You are welcome to either contact or visit the WMRHS in Union Bridge for a more definite answer...

RE: Fun Fact About Postcards
Posted July 28, 2021, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan, that is excellent information. I always sort of wondered how the colorization took place and how they knew the exact colors to use. This sheds some light on the process. Thank you for sharing.

Original color need not apply below...

Posted July 28, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

https://fox4kc.com/business/rock-island-bridge-plan-hopes-to...

It sounds like full speed ahead, with an expected opening date of March 2023. Plans show trail development, including the abandoned bridge downstream...

Posted July 28, 2021, by George Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here we go again.This bridge is closed indefinitely due to a garbage truck striking one of the height restriction barriers at the bridge yesterday according to the local paper where i live.It wasn't specified which barrier was struck by the garbage truck.When are these dumber than a box of rocks truck drivers going to realize there is a height limit on these bridges?Thank god for height barriers.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Dan Ross (drosstgv [at] gmail [dot] com)

A 1965 map for completeness. (The subsequent map, 1983, has the current routing of highway 131.)

Posted July 28, 2021, by Dan Ross (drosstgv [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is a 1948 reprint of a 1926 USGS map that confirms what I thought. State highway 131 had a very jagged route prior to the railroad’s & tunnel’s removal. The curvy road (Hybein) still there is the old 131 and it would have gone over the present day 131.

I think when we went exploring 2 decades ago, we saw faint yellow painted lines on Hybein Lane.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Dan Ross (drosstgv [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was it filled in? I don’t have a source, but it appeared that it was daylighted to allow the highway to follow the RR grade and to eliminate sharp curves & grades on the highway. I’ve meant to try to track down any accounts of its removal plus older maps of the area.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Erin,

Unless this bridge is a stone arch bridge that was encased in concrete, I would assume its newer than the 1870s as concrete most likely would not have been used at that time.

Fun Fact About Postcards
Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was on a call today discussing a bridge and the conversation of color postcards of old bridges came up. I already knew that these old postcards were colorized versions of black and white photos. What I didn't know is apparently the colorization process was often done by some company in Germany and unless they were specifically instructed otherwise, they took creative license as to what colors they used. As such, historical colorized postcards should not be relied upon in determining original bridge paint color.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Michael G Smith (mgsrecruiting [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to "Engineering Record" January 7, 1911, page 12, "The French Broad River Bridge, Southern Railway":

"Work was commenced on the bridge in October, 1906, and was prosecuted until November 1907, when operations were discontinued until April 1909. The work was carried on continuously from that date until completion in May 1910."

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 1,336,988 bytes)

Posted July 28, 2021, by Erin (erindingle [at] gmail [dot] com)

Was this underpass/bridge built in 1872 or later? Many thanks. Grew up next to this bridge in the old Sanatorium Power House Apartment.

Astor Bridge (New York)
Posted July 28, 2021, by Luke

That was exactly my thoughts, Nathan

https://bridgehunter.com/ny/dutchess/astor-drive/

Astor Bridge (New York)
Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It says its the Astor Bridge in Rhinebeck, New York. Unless someone else has a better idea, my guess is it is here, on Astor Drive, which is also actually within the limits of Rhinebeck as shown by Google:

https://goo.gl/maps/DRAhhfwKTCepDnma9

Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Clark,

I agree it might be that when James put together the website he only imported pre-1950 concrete arch bridges.

I pulled up the Historic Bridge Inventory and it seems the reason an arch was built here in the 1950s was because of its park setting. Here is the info from the inventory:

The South Chagrin Reservation bridge placed in 1957 and was designed by Osborn Engineering of Cleveland, who did other bridges for the Metropolitan Park Board in the 1950s and 1960s. The open spandrel arch bridge type was used because of the setting in the reservation. The bridge has no distinctive or innovative details, and it is traditional in its design and aesthetics. While handsome and representative example of its monumental bridge type, the bridge is a late example of a technology that had been used in Ohio and throughout the nation in similar settings since about 1910. There are numerous earlier examples including the 1909 Barrett Road railroad bridge in Berea and the 1925 Hilliard Road Bridge, both in Cuyahoga County, and the 1917 Victory Parkway Bridge at Cincinnati, as well as many of them have been determined to be select. This bridge is not historically or technologically significant. Osborn Engineering Company was the earliest engineering firm in Cleveland, and in addition to their many bridges and buildings in Cleveland, they are nationally known for stadiums.

Astor Bridge (New York)
Posted July 28, 2021, by Luke

The current bridge is a through girder, but the picture is definitely NOT a through girder.

Might be a concrete arch, slab, I-beam or deck girder

Also, it's nowhere near the location stated in the postcard.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It's not a common design for the late '50s. Perhaps the date is why it wasn't on the site. I also wonder if '57 is a rehab rather than a build. Nice to see a well cared for concrete arch.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to my sister Deborah Iazzo for allowing her photos of these bridges to be posted here.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks to my sister Deborah Iazzo for allowing her photos of these bridges to be posted here.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was worried I was adding a duplicate bridge here, I am not sure why this still extant large concrete arch bridge was not listed here... an unfortunate development as I drove over this bridge on my way to the Chagrin Falls Bridge. Due to the rehab it does not look historic from the road.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I believe the bridge in the second photo can be seen in the background of the first one. I also suspect that the first postcard is mislabeled, as this appears to be a lightweight Baltimore truss built for buggies and not trains. Owego Bridge Company built a good number of these in New York.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Glad it helped, it might be too much to hope for but maybe if Daniel is still around maybe he will find these additions and reach out to us. Would be nice to reestablish communication with him. He had all these photos of demolished bridges that nobody else has...

Posted July 28, 2021, by Luke

No problem! Thanks for taking pictures!

Posted July 28, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks to Nathan's Airport Road Bridge post, I was able to get back to the archived listing for this bridge in the now defunct Disappearing Bridges website

Posted July 28, 2021, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The abutments in Nathan’s photo appear to be very old concrete with severe spalling. I am not sure if this truss is original to this location. If it was moved here, it would have been brought here around 1900 based on the concrete substructures. I will see if I can find more info on this bridge in an archive somewhere.

Posted July 28, 2021, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Whoops my bad thanks for correcting it. Luke

Posted July 27, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Patrick & Tony,

A viable possibility. Kind of reminds me of the half bridge in France.

However, I'm hoping someone has the answer, not just a good hypothesis.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thank you for posting that Nathan.

re: re: re: Trying to Identify a Bridge Location
Posted July 27, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I decided to try my hand at cleaning up Victoria's picture. A fun and inexpensive hobby for when I'm too far gone to do anything useful. I still have a ways to go on quality and ability but it is fun trying to get a sense of what the image sort of looked like when taken.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I posted one of my recent photos of this VERY NICE Pratt truss that John Marvig added. Full set of photos at https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=o...

Posted July 27, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I remember that site well!

Posted July 27, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was poking through the remnants of Daniel Alward's legendary (and long-lost) bridge website on the Internet Archive, and figured it wouldn't hurt to add some of the highlights as time allows. Sadly the Internet Archive only saved a tiny fraction of his photos, mostly in ultra-low resolution, due to the Javascript that ran most of his website, and Daniel Alward himself disappeared as completely as the bridges on his "Disappearing Bridges" website.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Luke

Spoke too soon, as I found https://books.google.com/books?id=Ey1KAQAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA57&d..., which confirms that Keystone fabricated this extension, as well as the original South Side Elevated segments per https://www.chicago-l.org/history/southside.html

Posted July 27, 2021, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Added builder from chicago-l.org website. I lived in Chicago when this bridge was closed, and I remember that for a time, the Metra/IC railroad line accepted CTA tickets at its 63rd Street station. This station is visible in Dave King's new historical photos, in current google satellite view, and is in Metra's current timetables.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Huffman Mill Covered Bridge on the Perry-Spencer County line used to feature a half-and-half paint scheme. That was indeed a case of the two counties not agreeing on maintenance... so your theory certainly has merit Patrick.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Tim Van Scoyoc (tvan [at] verizon [dot] net)

I was quite interested when I found these photos. I'm the volunteer editor of the Blair County Historical Society newsletter and working on an article for the upcoming issue on the 200th anniversary of the completion of the HCI Turnpike. I'd like to get permission to include one of these photos, but I have not found the contact information for Eric Johnson. If anyone can help me out with how to obtain permission, I'd appreciate it. We would of course acknowledge the source. Thanks.

re: re: Trying to Identify a Bridge Location
Posted July 27, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Great photo Virginia!!

I'll add a little detail to Nathan's post.

The photo was taken from or near the little metal hut seen at the lower left of the following image (this image is from ca. 1900):

https://bridgehunter.com/photos/25/30/253078-L.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Whirlpool_Rapids_Bridge_2...

It is below Niagara Falls looking back upstream towards them. The falls are up the valley/chasm but out of view on the right, beyond the bridges. Directly above the right side of the bridges on the attached image but a bit harder to see in yours is the mist 'cloud' rising from the falls.

This is an illustration taken from a point on the left side of your image, looking upstream from between the two bridges giving you a sense of how close the falls are:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niagara_Cantilever_Bridge#/m...

As the arch bridge was functionally complete on August 27, 1897 (it was built underneath and they did it in a way that the road and railroad stayed open as they transferred what held it up from a suspension bridge to an arch! I doubt all traces of the prior suspension bridge were removed right away (no traces are visible in your image), and the people are in summer dress, (without more detailed research) the earliest date from the image is summer of 1898.

As the cantilever bridge's replacement was begun in 1924 (I don't know the date of the groundbreaking) and there are no signs of construction, the latest date was 1924.

Based on the outfits, I'd guess early 1900s probably within a year or two of him coming over. Here's a group shot taken in the same spot in 1905: https://jeannetreat.wordpress.com/2012/02/20/niagara-falls-o...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Luke

Images are of a bridge farther upstream/uptrail

https://bridgehunter.com/in/elkhart/bh93744/

Posted July 27, 2021, by Scott Ash (sah5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

7/27/21

Posted July 27, 2021, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

July 27th 2021

Posted July 27, 2021, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art,

Possibly county line is in the middle of the bridge, and the two counties had different ideas about upkeep of the bridge, and who was responsible?

Posted July 27, 2021, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I just added the link to the image. I went back and looked but I didn’t see anything mentioning a builder.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted July 27, 2021, by Luke

Dave, does the article mention a builder?

Posted July 27, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Interesting; it appears that the left half of the bridge (1 1/2 spans) was painted a different color than the right. Its not a shadow nor a photographic touch-up. Assuming it is the paint scheme, does anyone know the backstory?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Matthew G. Kistler (mattkistler94 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pretty sure this one has been replaced.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Luke

The second photograph shows the height restriction signage.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Douglas Dawson (Nospampeeps [at] yahoo [dot] com)

How high are the Bachman Tunnels. Do they support standard height commercial trucks?

'S' Bridge (North Carolina)
Posted July 27, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

https://coastalreview.org/2021/07/historic-hertford-s-bridge...

This article states that the bridge has been removed, but a possible glimmer of good news is that "There are local preservation efforts underway to put the structure on permanent display." So I assume it is being stored intact somewhere.

re: Trying to Identify a Bridge Location
Posted July 27, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It is the Whirlpool Highway Bridge and the Niagara Cantilever Bridge. The cantilever bridge has been replaced by the Whirlpool Railroad Bridge, while the Whirlpool Highway Bridge remains in place today. Therefore, your photo must date to before 1925. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t... https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t... https://bridgehunter.com/ny/niagara/whirlpool/

Trying to Identify a Bridge Location
Posted July 27, 2021, by Virginia Blake West (vmblakewest [at] aol [dot] com)

Hi, all; I'm trying to identify the location of a bridge in a photo of my maternal grandfather (see attached photo -- it says 1930's in the file name but I think it was taken earlier). My best estimate is that the photo was taken in the early 1900's, after he had emigrated to the US from Germany. My other best guess is that it's somewhere in upstate NY. He lived in Brooklyn, NYand his wife had relatives in Marion, NY (Wayne County). I do know that his wife and mother-in-law visited Marion at least once to attend a family funeral. It looks somewhat like the bridge in Letchworth State Park, but that's just a guess. I'm the resident family genealogist, so this would be nice to know. Thanks so much for any help or another reference you might be able to share.

Posted July 27, 2021, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Judging by the ariel photos via Google Map and Bing Map, this bridge is long gone. There's nothing left of it.

Posted July 26, 2021, by Sandy Sorlien (sandysorlien [at] comcast [dot] net)

Peacock's Locks (the Duncan Canal outlet) had five chambers originally, as shown on the 1827 Schuylkill Navigation Co maps. Then the whole flight was doubled, so there may have been 10 chambers for a short period between the doubling (1830-ish) and the enlargement of the system (1846) when all such 5-chamber locks were reduced to two. That occurred because the new larger chambers with the deeper canal channels could each overcome more rise and fall than each smaller one could. Peacock's was still the highest total rise/fall in the system. Also, someone asked whether there was a canal aqueduct here. Not on the bridge, but a bit farther up the Duncan Canal there's a small stone aqueduct, Rickenbach's Culvert, carrying the canal over a small stream.

Posted July 26, 2021, by John M. Bernhisel (jbernhisel [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was destroyed by a fire caused by a downed power line.

https://mynorthwest.com/2149915/history-in-flames-whitman-co...

Posted July 26, 2021, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Yep, 'post in haste..'

Point is that the line was built by Cincinnati as the Cincinnati Southern who are still the owners. I was surprised that CNTP still existed but it does as the entity which handles the lease with, first Southern and presently Norfolk Southern.

Posted July 26, 2021, by steve yordy (yordysj25 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice, short accessible curved tunnel.

Easy to walk thru.

Used by ATVs.

Posted July 26, 2021, by Anonymous

You might want to take another look at the bridge it's in worse condition now

re: Hello
Posted July 26, 2021, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Dan,

Glad to meet you and we look forward to seeing what you have to share! I have activated your account and you may now log in! Welcome to the BridgeHunter community! We welcome your contributions. If you have any questions or need help, feel free to post a question to this forum.

Rockfall landslide kills 9 and destroys Bailey Bridge in Kinnaur district of Indian state of Himachal Pradesh
Posted July 25, 2021, by Luke
Posted July 25, 2021, by Brian R. Warren

@Glyn: I suspect this to be the case. I visited the area on July 20, 2021. This bridge is supposed to cross Oakohay Creek on CR 29, but that road ends prior to the coordinates provided by Google. The red arrow on the attached photo indicates where CR 22/29 end--travelling further northeast from this point would put one onto fenced private land. If the bridge still exists, it is on posted private property.

Posted July 25, 2021, by Brian R. Warren (sanitarian1281[at]yahoo[dot]com)

I visited this site on July 19, 2021. Getting to it was tricky because the dirt road leading to this abandoned alignment of US 11 was being graded at the time and it wasn't REALLY wide enough for two vehicles. It's a bit unclear whether this bridge is still on public land; it is directly adjacent to land evidently used by the US Navy for weapons testing and other parcels owned by NASA.

Posted July 25, 2021, by Evan Burrus

This bridge had a fire a few years back and is closed to all traffic.

Posted July 25, 2021, by Anonymous

It's the "Cincinnati, New Orleans, Texas and Pacific", not "New Orleans, Texas and Pacific"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati,_New_Orleans_and_Te...

Posted July 25, 2021, by Robert Stephenson (seinfeld99 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

https://www.bigdogadventures.com/1OldIllinoisBridges.htm

Scroll down to Jan. 7th 2012, second bridge visited that day is The remains of the Old Iron Bridge.

Posted July 25, 2021, by Warren Jenkins (wwjenkins77 [at] verizon [dot] net)

Operator before the Norfolk Southern merger in 1982 was the Southern Railway.

Posted July 25, 2021, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

From Thurman Davis KC Events FB group.

Hello
Posted July 25, 2021, by Dan Hubbell (schleusenmeister [at] gmail [dot] com)

I just signed up for an account here, and wanted to say hello. I used to be an inland towboat-and-barge mariner on the Mississippi and other rivers, on the Gulf and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterways, and in the San Francisco Bay Area. Now I'm a bridge tender for SMART. We own three drawbridges, each one completely different from the next. I've gleaned a lot of insight from this website over the last few years -- all kinds of things I didn't know about bridges when I was passing under and through them!

Posted July 25, 2021, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

There seems to be a bit of confusion about this line, it's builder and ownership.

Cincinnati Southern, owned by the city of Cincinnati built the road. It was operated by the New Orleans, Texas and Pacific, sometimes refereed to as the NOTPR but in standard railroad designation shortened to NTPR.

New Orleans, Texas and Pacific ceased operating the road but still holds the lease for the Cincinnati Southern and has for about a century sub-leased the line to Norfolk & Western and it's successor Norfolk Southern. As I understand it the present day New Orleans, Texas and Pacific is nothing but the administrator of the lease for Cincinnati Southern.

To simplify, Cincinnati Southern was built by Cincinnati and leased to New Orleans, Texas and Pacific who now sub-lease it to Norfolk Southern.

Posted July 25, 2021, by Bruce Morgan (artie_morgan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge is closed due to structural damage


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