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Galt
Posted November 17, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Dana,

I'm not sure what I'm missing. The two photos (the portal view and the eBay listing of the side view) are of the same bridge in slightly different stages of construction. The portal view being earlier. Why is there a question?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 16, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm guessing this girder bridge replaced an older steel truss. Other parts of this Milwaukee Road mainline between Davenport, Iowa and Kansas City were upgraded through the 1930s and 1940s. I would estimate that the previous metal truss bridge was probably built in the 1890s, when major upgrades of the line occurred according to Milwaukee Road annual reports. The wooden bridge probably dates to 1881, when the railroad built through Galt.

Mercer & Somerset
Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks Art. Whats your opinion of Galt Crossing, you seem to have good eye for these

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

James wondered about this crossing the other day. Wasn't sure

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To clarify, the pier is a separate entity. I've been meaning to list it and some of the of the cool bridge related remains of the Mercer & Somerset here but haven't gotten to it yet.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

To clarify, the pier is a separate entity. I've been meaning to list it and some of the of the cool bridge related remains of the Mercer & Somerset here but haven't gotten to it yet.

Regards,

Art S.

Galt
Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

looks like two different crossings?

Galt
Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

James one you posted before one I did Replacement?

galt same seller
Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

same or different bridge

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

There is debate as to whether the bridge was put in before the M&S folded but there seems to be reasonably strong evidence that it was. However, once the Reading was able to go through, the railroad, a division of the PRR, was taken up west of the Millstone in the late 1870s. That pier has been sitting there, abandoned, since the late 1870s!!

Regards,

Art S.

Galt, Missouri wooden bridge?
Posted November 16, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)

Here's a very interesting find on eBay:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Real-Photo-Postcard-Post-Card-Galt-...

Posted November 16, 2018, by Luke

I believe this pier may be the pier mentioned in this: http://njrails.tripod.com/19th_Century/Mercer_and_somerset/M...

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

pier

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

ART just south of here google map has abandoned bridge pier. added can delete if not another bridge

Posted November 16, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Scheduled for Replacement 2018

Posted November 16, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Glad to help

Posted November 16, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thank you Art.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Luke, as always, thank you.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Luke

Current bridge was built 1994 replacing a 1955 bridge that replaced this.

Posted November 16, 2018, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Excelllent. Thanks for the photo! We’ll have to dig into the inventory to see when the current bridge was built, as that will give us an idea of when this one was replaced. Probably in the 60s when Highway 1 was improved from here and to the south.

Need help identifying historical railroad bridge WA/OR
Posted November 16, 2018, by Rebecca Cheney (beccacheney [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hello everyone.

My Great Grandfather helped build a trussel style bridge along what looks like the Columbia River. If anyone would please watch this video, the bridge is shown in the last third. Im trying to find the name for a documentary. Thank you for your time.

https://app.aframe.com/links/2816a9d41667bb1293657dfb2a240a9...

Posted November 15, 2018, by Luke

"A contract will be awarded to cover the replacing of timber structures with steel spans across the Calapooia river, on the Oregon Electric, at Albany, Ore., at an estimated cost of $90,000. The filling of a timber bridge and placing a reinforced ..."

Excerpted from https://books.google.com/books?id=EY0lAAAAMAAJ&q=Oregon%20el...

and

https://hh-today.com/work-upgrades-trestle-on-pw-line/?fbcli...

Says a G&W/PNWR PR guy sais it's late 1800s, but a commentor says there's a 1908 cutout on the upper part of the bridge.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I know nothing about this structure, I believe when I first added this bridge it was listed with an unknown build date. Then Charles posted something about the 1908 build date which was incorporated into the listing.

I would agree that the truss details are more consistent with something pre-1900. My guess is that the truss was moved to this location in 1908 from somewhere else in the country.

Most rail trusses in the northwest prior to 1900 were timber trusses built in the 1880's and 90's. My guess is the timber decayed away in 20 to 30 years and recycled trusses were brought in to replace the timber. There are plenty of examples of this practice around Oregon.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My pleasure Melissa!

I always enjoy looking at these old photos and postcards and trying to fill in the blanks! This one is challenging though!

Posted November 15, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tony, I appreciate Any information. Thank you very much !

Posted November 15, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Hard to tell Melissa... The upper chord looks to be flat which would suggest a Pratt, Whipple or Baltimore truss. But it's too fuzzy to be sure.

unknown (Kansas)
Posted November 15, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Stone abuts could suggest an older bridge once existed at this location.

Mingo Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted November 15, 2018, by Rickey (planefred [at] gmail [dot] cvom)

The railroaders call it the Mingo Tunnel, I think it is still labelled that on one portal.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I made the mistake of Googling Dogface Bridge Indiana. Yikes ! Tons of videos and websites about it being Haunted.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Dennis Newcom (newcom12915 [at] comcast [dot] net)

The bridge is still there as of 14 Nov. 2018.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes, that is correct, the piers now support high voltage powerlines.

Posted November 15, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree that the portals and the pin connections indicate an older bridge, however I haven’t seen a subdivided Warren that’s pin connected before this. I would think if it was an 1880s bridge, it probably would’ve been built as a whipple. Perhaps this one was built in the 1890s and moved here? Relocation was quite common on railroads, especially former main line spans that had life left in them.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Luke

Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Now technically Canadian Pacific, but there's rumours of the DM&E coming back) And it's a TPG.

Posted November 14, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

Am I seeing correctly that they repurposed the bridge piers for the powerlines?

Posted November 14, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Hey there Bridge Hunters...I need some help with this one. Please review and update as needed. Thanks !

Posted November 14, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Does anyone else think that this bridge's pin-connected trusses and their subdivided, modified Warren truss are a little elaborate for a 1908 bridge? I'm wondering if this is a bridge relocated here in 1908. Cannot find any info online. I don't recall ever seeing a pin-connected Warren truss of any variety on a railroad that wasn't pre-1900. Most are 1880s.

Posted November 14, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Modern MOB bridges are a scam. Cheap Walmart bridges. These companies claim the weathering steel will last forever yet some of these are replaced after 25 years, others require blasting and painting to halt deterioration. I have also heard that these companies will suggest a low price, but that they like to "nickel and dime" the customer.

Posted November 14, 2018, by Daniel

if location is correct, I don't think that qualifies as "replaced by new bridge"

Posted November 14, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thank you Mom. It was Cold this morning ! I was at this bridge six weeks ago on Friday and it was 90 !

Posted November 14, 2018, by Doris M Blair (dmblair59 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Fantastic photos of a long ago bridge!You are doing a great job on posting these beautiful forgotten bridges! 🌉🌉🌉

Posted November 14, 2018, by Anonymous

This is not the Corsons Inlet Bridge. This is the Strathmere Bascule Bridge over Strathmere Bay. The Corsons Inlet Bridge is about a mile north of this bridge and crosses the Corsons Inlet and is a fixed steel girder bridge, also under Bridge Commission ownership but not tolled.

Standard piling depth?
Posted November 14, 2018, by K. Sorensen (karalynn99 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Researching the Nymore Bridge (2366), built in 1916-17. The builder stated that the pilings were sunk 50 feet underground. Would this have been notable/surprising for the era?

Posted November 14, 2018, by vhsbetamax

The bridge currently on KY 94 that goes over Clarks River was built in 1983 (according to inspection data). So, using this info and my comment below, we can infer that this bridge was relocated here in 1984.

Posted November 13, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I was planning a trip to this bridge. While researching it I found out it was Lost. I included a link to the source of the information.

Posted November 13, 2018, by vhsbetamax (garrettherndon24 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is locally called the "Rattling Bridge". In addition, a person on geocaching.com (there is a geocache on this bridge) says this about the bridge: "This is part of the original bridge that went across Highway 94. Then it had an old wooden bottom, so whenever cars traveled across it of course it made a rattling sound. When they built the new bridges on highway 94 they floated this one down Clarks River to where it now rest, and also replaced the old wooden bottom with a concrete bottom."

Charles L Keller Bascule Design
Posted November 13, 2018, by Douglas Butler

This bascule bridge design patent of 1,047,950 of Charles L Keller a patent of the Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge Company Invented a bascule bridge with a plan, was patented 1912 this design was built in France and is the first and only bascule bridge built in Provence Alpes Cote d Azur France constructed in 1917 is a Ponte Levant La Seyne Sur Mer is a rolling counterweight heel trunnion because the counterweight is curved on the framework to the counterweight bridge tower and the drive machinery with the mechanism inside. The counterweight has a rack and the pinion is stationed on the bridge tower with the machinery.

Posted November 13, 2018, by Luke

Andy, the article says "A detour was required so the new bridge could be built in the same location, keeping the road straight and reducing construction delays.", which means the bridge will be demolished to make way for the new one.

Nice of the article to give us a DOT (Usable!) picture though.

And good job finding said article.

Posted November 13, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Daniel,

This is generally true. The marketing has similarities as well. The problem is history (both American and engineering) is being lost because the bureaucracy isn't set up to maintain, only replace. The replaced bridge is generic, it really doesn't matter what truss type is used, that's merely decoration, in this case a 'pretty, white bowstring'.

This historic bridge was adequate for the purpose. However, having it maintained or restored required much more back-office work than simply marking the 'replace' box. Hopefully, the movement to preserve (metal) truss bridges will accelerate as covered bridges (wooden truss bridges) may outnumber historic metal trusses soon.

Oddly/fortunately, there are pockets of preservation such as Hunterdon County, NJ and large swaths of Indiana where people 'get it.' These areas actually feature the bridges in tourism materials and understand that if the infrastructure can be put in place to maintain these bridges, the cost/benefit can work.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 13, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Those trusses are from an original bridge. Cruciform outriggers, etc. No feet though.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 13, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Clearly a railroad bridge. I would think it was built between the late 1890s and the first decade of the 20th century. It also wouldn’t be surprising if it was relocated to this location, as most railroads found reuse for spans no longer suitable for mainline use.

Posted November 13, 2018, by Daniel

Makes sense. I'd been thinking originally RR and then later converted to road, but you're right about being built too light.

I'm still confused by the topos. Does early 1890s sound reasonable?

Posted November 13, 2018, by Daniel

Many of the bridges that we love were also mail order bridges, although they were assembled on site. Look at how similar many of them from a given company are.

I wonder if, 140 years ago, people lamented covered bridges being replaced by mail order iron bridges.

Posted November 13, 2018, by Dennis Tully (dtully [at] wi [dot] rr [dot] com)

After some research about the bridge photo shown here:

https://bridgehunter.com/wi/racine/bh73379/

I believe that the bridge in the photo is not the "State Street Bridge" but it is the "Main Street Bridge" that was built in Racine in 1906 which agrees with various newspaper articles that I have. That 1906 Main Street Bridge was replaced in 1928.

The 1928 Main Street Bridge was replaced with this:

http://bridgehunter.com/wi/racine/B51008000000000/

Posted November 13, 2018, by Luke

Possibly purchased from the Great Northern route, as that's the sole railroad the Skagit route interchanged with.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Christopher Finigan

Looks like this bridge was relocated here from elsewhere.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Matt Lohry

The deck also has longitudinal runner planks, which is indicative of a road bridge. Also, the portal bracing is not high enough to accommodate rail traffic.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Matt Lohry

Mike,

A "mail order bridge" is a mass-produced, single-piece bridge built to a cookie-cutter pattern, welded together, and lifted into place with a crane. They are normally prefab trusses or arches and have no distinguishing features to set them apart from one another. This is one of two identical footbridges in this area; the other is about 1000 feet to the north over the same river. That bridge did not replace any previous bridge. I live around here, so I see these on a regular basis.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

What about the replacement makes it a MOB?

I'll agree that the original bridge didn't look anywhere near like a bridge that would have warranted replacing and that doing so really wasn't necessary, but...I'm confused by what makes the new one a "mail order bridge", so to speak, when there's only the side view to go on.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I enjoy finding them in overgrown areas. For some reason it's more exciting to me.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Luke

Too light to be RR

Posted November 12, 2018, by Daniel

I had considered railroad bridge being the most likely scenario, but none of the topo maps show a rail crossing of the river here either.

It could be one, I guess a short spur from the rail line (which appears to always have been SE of the river here) to town or something.

Posted November 12, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

How many tunnels are there on the UP rail system in this area and/or in this county?I was baffled just trying to locate them.Seems they're everywhere you look!

Pumpkin Vine Railroad bridge
Posted November 12, 2018, by Tim Fellure (timfellure [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Wooden beam used in the bridge over the Wabash River

Posted November 12, 2018, by Daniel

That sure doesn't look to be "open to traffic", and it looks like it's been a while since they bypassed it.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Larry Hornbaker (larryhornbaker [at] outlook [dot] com)

Found this bridge on Nov 8, 2018. Has been left in place and Eagle Rd now bypasses it on the north side. Very overgrown and difficult to see much detail of bridge.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Daniel

does "deck burned off" qualify as "lost"?

Posted November 12, 2018, by Anonymous

There was a wooden bridge east of that bridge and a signal light

Posted November 12, 2018, by Anonymous

It’s Southern Railway not Norfolk and Western

Posted November 12, 2018, by Daniel

Looking at old topo maps...

1962 doesn't show a road, nor do 1955, 1950

1980 shows a road, including crossing the river

but going much farther back...

1893 shows a road crossing the river at about the right place

1891 shows a significantly different route for the river, which surprises me (it doesn't make it's jog to the south)

It seems unlikely that the river changed it's course that much. Looking at the contour lines there's no other reasonable path.

Am I missing something?

Any thoughts on age? 1893 seems possible, but I'd be surprised at topo missing a bridge like this.

Posted November 12, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

There was NOTHING WRONG with this bridge!!!!!!!

Posted November 11, 2018, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

As of 11/11/2018 bridge is closed. There is a large snag of logs on the West side of the bridge. I didn't venture out onto the bridge to see if it was damaged or not.

Posted November 11, 2018, by Kristen and Ken

Loved our visit!

Posted November 11, 2018, by Kristen and Ken

Beautiful bridge!

Posted November 11, 2018, by Tom Marney (panterarosa2k [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here are some photos I took last week.

Posted November 11, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

"They're coming to get you Barbara"...creeps me out every time.

Posted November 11, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Damn! Needing to watch NOFLD again. "They're dead...They're all messed up"...

Posted November 11, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Clark, now I have to rewatch the movie to see the bridge !

Posted November 11, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike, loved your description of the "soggy graham cracker" deck.

Posted November 11, 2018, by Craig Philpott (craigphilpott63 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted November 11, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Btw, I did not swipe it.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I hiked through the new Eaton Tunnel on October 4th of this year. After getting through the tunnel, I hiked up the bank to visit the West Portal of this tunnel again. To say that the experience was eerie would be an understatement.

The day was very hot and muggy by October standards in West Virginia. The temperature was in the upper 80s perhaps close to 90 when I arrived. A thunderstorm was brewing in the distance. It was so humid out that you could practically chew the atmosphere. Much of West Virginia had record rainfall this year. Wood County was no exception. The ground was absolutely soaked and there was mud everywhere. So, please try to imagine a hot muggy day full of mud and mosquitoes.

Now, when I arrived at the tunnel portal, there was cold air blowing out between the three stones that are piled above the old tunnel portal. It was hot outside, but apparently it was cold in the tunnel. The temperature difference caused the air to rush out of the tunnel rapidly. The air was blowing so quickly out of the tunnel that it was actually blowing small plants around near those three stones. As I sat beside those stones, I could hear and feel that cold air rushing out. To be honest, the cold air felt good and it kept the mosquitoes away. It just felt very eerie.

Thanks to the record rainfall, I could hear water dripping in the tunnel. The tunnel is an enclosed space and so the water falling from the ceiling was echoing as it struck the tunnel floor. It sounded like there was lots of loud tapping sounds coming from the tunnel although it was just the rain water falling in there.

Although part of the tunnel has collapsed and was apparently sealed off as a tomb, the West end of the tunnel most certainly exists. It must be open for quite some distance back under the hill to produce all of that cold air that was rushing out through that little hole.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, the first pic is awesome, BUT the bridge is truly gorgeous!!!

Posted November 10, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe the house at driveway is now derelict. The deck on the bridge is terrible. Also, North-side name plate got swiped.

Lost Bridge (Indiana)
Posted November 10, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Guy is right. I wouldn't walk across this. The south-end side of the deck is a real hazard. North-end side is better. I went about half way and chickened out.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Lots of debris on this bridge. In bad shape.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge looks about the same now as in 2006, except northside plate gone (Aholes!!). Had a blast and was creeped out by the bouncy deck.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Dexter Funkhouser

……………… Briefcase Plaque...…..

Posted November 10, 2018, by Luke

Unfortunately, park/golf course use doesn't mean these bridges are safe.

An example that I have personal ties to/find more egregiously short-sighted/wasteful: https://bridgehunter.com/ia/story/veekner-golf-course/

Posted November 10, 2018, by Matt Lohry

Label me a damn fool for thinking this bridge might be around for the long term, as it was in a park-type setting and was in excellent condition—I drove by today and saw an ugly Walmart-inspired MOB where this bridge once stood!

Posted November 10, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks,luke.I looked on the Delaware side,not the New Jersey side of the bridge where the building is located.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Thanks for fixing pin

Posted November 10, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It looks like the 2014 rehab replaced the pony truss with a steel stringer.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Little steel reinforcements at some point, beauty large arch

Posted November 10, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Crazy remote roads to this one, deck rehab at some point, great stone abutments, pin should be on road hump, just left of center.....pretty spot

Posted November 10, 2018, by Luke

.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Archie Marsh (Arch [dot] e [dot] marsh [at] gmail [dot] com)

To get to the other side.

Posted November 10, 2018, by Luke

It's on the eastern bank.

Posted November 10, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dan,in the top picture in the comments section i see a building on the left but when I looked on satellite i didn't see it.When was it demolished?

Posted November 10, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Dana and Kay along with Luke for the information identifying this bridge.Does anybody know if there are any plans for this bridge like a trail bridge,maybe?


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