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Posted January 17, 2020, by Don Morrison

A sad day I'm sure, Greg.

"...And all the towns and people seem

To fade into a bad dream

And the steel rails still ain't heard the news

The conductor sings his song again

The passengers will please refrain

This train's got the disappearing railroad blues"

-Arlo Guthrie

Posted January 17, 2020, by Don Morrison

Thanks for the add, Clark;

Living three blocks away, I'll try to get a photo soon.

When I get time.

LOL

Trivia; I pronounce it Boostee, but some around here pronounce it Bust-eye.

I'm a lover and they are fighters, I guess.

CGW FTW!

Posted January 17, 2020, by Matt

The pin is in the correct location. The road used to run straight north-south, but a low water crossing was put in to the east of the bridge, hence the road bows out to the east. The wood deck was very bad in the 1980's. My brother drove a truck across it in the 80's and had a tire drop through. After that, a very large summer rainstorm did severe damage to the bridge. I think it actually took the bridge out, but I cannot remember for sure. The low-water crossing was put in then. Be careful in the area in warm weather as there lots of rattlesnakes around there. Along that road and on the Halling farm on the east side, tons of rock were hauled out over the years. My dad and grandpa picked up many loads of rock in the 1940's for foundation repairs and retaining walls. There used to be four sizable rock houses within a mile of there. The only one that still exists is directly south-east, over the hill from where the bridge was.

Note that the description should read that the location is 2.2 miles EAST of Denton, not west.

Posted January 17, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thank you,John.That's the bridge I was talking about.

Posted January 17, 2020, by George Bluvas (beerhockeyrock [at] gmail [dot] com)

That thing is a truck eater,and is known locally as The KK Can Opener

It has its own facebook page https://www.facebook.com/KK-Can-Opener-342739173180914/

Posted January 17, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed a truss bridge inside the cantilever truss when looking at the middle of the bridge in the street view picture by Craig James.Why would that bridge be inside the other bridge which covers it?

Posted January 17, 2020, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This will be nice when itís done !

Posted January 17, 2020, by Scott Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Zero traffic !

Posted January 17, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

George,

I think youíre thinking about this bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/mn/mower/cedar-river-railroad/

Posted January 17, 2020, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

You can follow the grade leading to the trestle sight on the state of Oregon's Lidar page into Reedsport. I was unable to find which specific logging railroad built the railroad, but I was able to compile a list of lumber companies which may have had logging railroads out of Reedsport. Balderidge Logging Co. 1931-1938, C. Mc. C. Johnson Lumber Co. 1921-1928, Elrod & Wills Lumber Co. 1929-1930, Umpqua Mills and Timber Co. 1924-1934, Winchester Bay Lumber Co. 1920-1936, and H-K Logging 1922-1929.

Posted January 16, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Greg,is that abandoned bridge over Ramsey Mill Pond a part of this rail line I see?I followed the abandoned rail line and saw it.

Posted January 16, 2020, by greg L morrill (gregmorrill2 [at] aol [dot] com)

I have photo's of this bridge just north of Fredricksburg, Ia. I was the conductor on this job. Had engineer do a run by to get photo's

Posted January 16, 2020, by greg L morrill (gregmorrill2 [at] aol [dot] com)

I believe were talking about Renova, mn, (cgw). I have a photo of the north local, on that bridge, overlooking the old Milwaukee right-of-way, I was the conductor on this job. Had engineer stop the caboose hop, for the pose.

Posted January 16, 2020, by greg morrill (gregmorrill2 [at] aol [dot] com)

I was the conductor on this take up train. was also the conductor when running as the north local. Took photo's of each town as we departed on the take up crew for the last time., sad days of events long past. Still very fresh in memory!

Posted January 16, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

I just saw a youtube video, and then read a article that the Montopolis bridge has been permanently closed to vehicles and will be just used as a pedestrian/bicycle bridge. I like to see these bridges open for what they were built for, but traffic is very heavy both ways on this road. This would also increase the longevity of this spectacular bridge. I'm glad I got to ride across this bridge in a car when I was on my Austin trip. A parallel southbound bridge was already built to the west of this bridge and already operating when I was there.

Posted January 16, 2020, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you look to the right of the white buildings above and just east of the trestle, you can see the remains of another, shorter trestle

King Iron Bridge History
Posted January 16, 2020, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan put this together as we were doing the Springfield Bridge project.

Attachment #1 (application/pdf; 2,324,895 bytes)

Iola
Posted January 16, 2020, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes I did find other bowstrings referenced maybe at the historic museum. It was on the west side near the factory I think.

I've poked around the one still there too.

Posted January 15, 2020, by robert medlin (hydroman01 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

that bridge is fully collapsed, the one closer to the highway is still there...its has holes in it.

Posted January 15, 2020, by robert medlin (hydroman01 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

ive sent pics of this in. last time i crossed it was apprx 1974. and info on build date and if it was just a farm road railroad road?

Re: Iola
Posted January 15, 2020, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Kansas also attracted a few other "branch offices" as well. I think that the iron and steel in the Statehouse Dome was provided by our friend P.E. Lane.

RE: Iola
Posted January 15, 2020, by Luke

Julie, do you remember seeing anything relating to the bowstring I found a postcard of while you were there? I've been unable to find much online.

Iola
Posted January 15, 2020, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Kansas in the early days was a lot like cities or counties paying for Google or Amazon to come in to build a business. It was all about the jobs. King Bridge was invited first via a bond to come to Iola. They built a factory and had a building downtown. They built bridges. Early King bowstrings were quite light and changed over time with the outriggers, floor beams, upper sway and lower bracing. See Old Richardsville or Danville Mickles. Nathan and I did look at some of those eras of design with the Springfield Des-Arc bowstring historic research, it's differences to the McIntyre and others we've worked on.

Topeka came in with a better offer to move. King took them up on it to move operations. I didn't follow the research further as to why they ended their business in Topeka.

I find the research into the King business very informative. Zenas did go to jail for collusion, but he was working with the other bridge builders in the 1890s to make sure they all had work, and working against American Bridge Co and Carnegie Steel who were purchasing those businesses back east.

There is also a terrific historic center in downtown Iola. That's where I first saw the picture and caption for loading of a bowstring bridge. 30 cattle at a time.

2019 Bridgehunter Awards for Lifetime Legacy Post Humous
Posted January 15, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Sadly, the 2019 Bridgehunter's Awards ended on a sad note. John F. Graham, who left his mark for identifying structural weaknesses on bridges through augmented reality Technology and for introducing the 90:10 Ratio for Bridge funding, passed away in March 2019. He spoke at the 2010 HB COnference in his hometown, Pittsburgh. The Lifetime Legacy Award Post Humous is being presented to him for his work in advocating Bridge rehab instead of replacement. A write-up on his works is here: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/01/15/bri...

Posted January 14, 2020, by Luke

King is the only recorded manufacturer I've found, but they only built in Iola from 1871-1872, after which they moved to Topeka, and after failing there they abandoned their Kansas/non-Ohio operations entirely.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

I added a sreetview -- I believe that I'm seeing is the bridge.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Luke

According to "Trolley through the Countryside" by Allison Chandler, the easternmost section didn't collapse, a NIMBY blew it up because he was mad that people were using it to fish on "his" property, despite the bridge not being his property at all.

RE: Iola Electric Railway Bridges
Posted January 14, 2020, by Luke

There are a couple that still exist (Laylonville, La Harpe, and on the section where the Iola and MoPac are following each other to the terminus at Moran. John'll probably get some high quality pics of them soon enough.

Speaking of MoPac tho, the coords you gave are for one of their bridges. Despite a desire/delusion by Frank V. Crouch to continue the line south to Humboldt to meet his planned Humboldt-Pittsburg "Kansas Southern Electric", nothing ever happened, so the line only ever went from Iola to Moran, with the little jog down to the cement plant.

Iola Electric Railway Bridges
Posted January 14, 2020, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Some of these Iola Electric Railway Bridges might not be as lost as you think...

37.925682, -95.444078

Posted January 14, 2020, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The photographs that were recently updated are marked as copyrighted on their associated website. Unless you get explicit written permission to upload photographs here, then you could be found guilty of a copyright violation.

Just because a photograph is posted online does not mean that it is in the public domain or available for the taking.

If you do get written permission to post a copyrighted photograph on here, then you should indicate that.

Providing a link to the original website, or stating "not my photo/video/etc" does not absolve you from any and all repercussions from using copyrighted material.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

While your assumption of King is logical, reasonable and probable; the rigging and arch seem too delicate to be a King to me.

Although it has certain CBW qualities, I doubt its them; was anyone else in the area making bridges? Were early Kings that light weight?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was surprised this long-span pin-connected Pratt truss was not already on BridgeHunter, but it is on private property so its probably been off the official inventories for a while.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Portions of the stone substructure of this bridge were retained and used in the replacement bridge.

Posted January 14, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge replaced a WIBC bowstring, if one of the other editors has more time than me, feel free to create its own page, photo attached.

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 13, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Art,

Sadly its mostly too late, Pennsylvania's remaining on-system bridge collection no longer displays the unique collection it once had (excluding big cities like Pittsburgh where preservation attitude is somewhat different.) Those of us trying to save bridges in Pennsylvania now are mostly just trying to save Pratts and Warrens so to speak. That said, we still have seen an improvement in Pennsylvania and continue to work to maintain this improvement.

Posted January 13, 2020, by Janice Carman (janice [at] monroecountyappeal)

Bridge is being dismantled starting today Jan. 13, 2020

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 13, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

Very true. I recently re-read the listing for the cast iron pony truss bridge that you tried to save; it was actually painful, knowing the outcome.

Generally, its interesting to see how the internal rules cause PA to defeat itself. Hopefully the tide will turn.

Regards,

Art S.

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 13, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yeah trust me this demolition is a drop in the bucket compared to what they needlessly destroyed elsewhere in the past 10 years...

Posted January 13, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its probably the last highway bridge that could be found Eligible For Listing in the National Register of Historic Places however.

Posted January 13, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted January 12, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Hi, yes land owner nice, lives on southeast end of bridge - hard to track down in town, diner is best bet or the welding shop on Main St., I parked on south(most) end, about 300 yards away in neighbor of landowner's driveway, and walked old line on south side to sinkhole at end of bridge, you can climb up there as I did at concrete support, or on other end but approach on north side so unbelievable long and elevated (900' as I recall stepping it off) that you may be inclined to climb the trees growing up through the tracks on that side to save some walking to north end where track is at ground level, which is what I did....bit labor intensive this one to be able to walk across actual bridge

Posted January 12, 2020, by James Szabo (Ak4za01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The outlaws name was rube burrow. He was from Lamar county

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rube_Burrow

Posted January 12, 2020, by James Szabo (Ak4za01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is also an old cable swinging bridge on the old road across from this trestle. Before the rerouted the road where the big hill is now, the road used to run across the old bridge. Itís still there itís pretty grown up but you can still get to it, either a log truck or spreader truck was going across and broke the one of the main cables. I was just a kid when it happened so I canít remember all of the details. But itís a neat old bridge to look at. Iíll try to get over there to take a picture in the near future

Identification of locomotives
Posted January 12, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I know this has nothing to do with bridges on this site but a friend of mine who stayed at his girlfriends house in Barnesville Pa in Schuylkill County Pa noticed blue locomotives on the railroad tracks while he was there.He said there was no identifying marks on the locomotives.I told him the only railroad I knew of in that area was RBMN and their locomotives are green colored.A possibility could be a railroad company that's sharing the rail line like maybe a short line hauler.If anybody knows which railroad these locomotives belong to let me know because I told him i'm stumped.Thanks.

Replacement of Forgedale Road culvert Rockland Township Pa
Posted January 12, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read in todays local paper that work was started last week on replacing a culvert on Forgedale Road with a 5-foot-diameter by 38-foot-long pipe to better drain stormwater.This culvert which is located near Orchard Road on Forgedale Road is expected to be replaced by Friday.Daily traffic count is 4,096 vehicles.Construction is being performed by PennDOT.The main reason for replacement was flooding which has been going on since November 2017 and has been flooding properties.

Posted January 12, 2020, by Kelly McClanahan
Posted January 12, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Yes, we drove across it today after we walked Hazleton.

Posted January 12, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Alright, Melissa! Great to see this up and going. I am shocked, being it looked so pitiful last time I saw it!!

Posted January 12, 2020, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Sadly this bridge was removed in late 2018 due to the neglect of the Western side abutment which crumbled further so the bridge was removed and the remains of the crumbled abutment lay next to it. They even removed the little Groton bridge that sat next to the joining road. A seriously tragic loss that could easily have been prevented by repairing the Western abutment! Apparently the 2008 branding of being a historical place meant nothing in this case!

Posted January 12, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

My mom graduated from there in (I think) 1957. She and my dad still go every Friday on a "Winslow" get-together with other grads to a selected indy restaurant.

Posted January 12, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike Daffron, the photo from the yearbook is amazing. I love it.

Bridgehunter Awards and Author's Choice Award Voting Results
Posted January 12, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Alas, the winners of the 2019 Bridgehunter Awards! Highlights and standings are here. The commentaries will come in the podcast. Congratulations on all our winners and the honorably mentioned candidates. It was a great year for bridges and for the voting! :-D https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/01/12/201... Well done, James Baughn. You won the Lifetime Legacy Awards for your website! :-D

Also the Author's Choice Awards have been presented. The results here: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/01/11/201...

Posted January 11, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking around this area on HA, I notice there were nearby crossings both to the west and east of this, both quite likely trusses - one is suggestive, one is plainly clear.

Hubbardston Road may have had a through truss, it was replaced (per NBI) in 1959.

Stoney Creek Road, when it crossed the creek, definitely had a pony - the 1965 image is quite clear. This one was gone by 1981.

Posted January 11, 2020, by Brian J. Patterson (pattersonbj [at] earthlink [dot] net)

This bridge crosses the un-navigable portion of the Des Plaines river. It is immediately south of the Brandon Road Bascule Bridge over the navigable portion of the Des Plaines River/Illinois Waterway south of Rockdale, Illinois and just downstream of the Brandon Road Lock and Dam.

Permanently closing Brandon Road is unlikely, and closing the Illinois Waterway just won't happen. However, the fate of this bridge is closely tied to its more mechanically temperamental bascule neighbor to the north.

IDOT is still trying to effect permanent and lasting repairs to the center lock of the bascule bridge, due in part to the number of bridges they will be obliged to replace in the immediate area in the next few years. Both this and the bascule bridge are slated to be eventually replaced by a "standard" IDOT UCEB over the entire Des Plaines river.

Due to the very close proximity of the two bridges, this bridge would have to be replaced at the same time to allow room for a driveable fixed bridge to replace the bascule bridge. How quickly "eventually" happens depends on whether, how quickly, and how cheaply IDOT can repair the bascule bridge.

Posted January 11, 2020, by Carl Marsico

Last train between Elgin and Crystal Lake was 4/14/83

Posted January 11, 2020, by Carl Marsico

Last train operated on 4/14/83

Posted January 11, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Both this bridge and the Ashmun Street bridge in Sault Ste. Marie (BH 20006) are products of the National Recovery Project, one of the multiple New Deal entities that emerged in effort to reverse the Great Depression.

I'm a bit at a loss for how to account for that particular project on here, though, because it's a little less straightforward compared to the Works Progress and Public Works Administrations. Plus, the National Recovery Administration, which would otherwise be my best guess, was declared unconstitutional in 1935, thus that entity lasted for much less time than the WPA and PWA.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Industrial_Recovery_A...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Recovery_Administrati...

Posted January 11, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

I wouldn't go quite so far as to say this is the last county bridge with *any* historical significance...the CN railroad bridge over M-53 is a Depression Era artifact, which is not exactly INsignificant.

It might be less of a stretch, though, to say that this is the bridge that best combines aesthetics and significance and still remains today.

Posted January 11, 2020, by Bill Robinson (modeltt [at] msn [dot] com)

This tunnel makes a good ride- if you can find it!

https://youtu.be/mkuwP8IEjRA

Posted January 11, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
W&GF - Foundry Branch Bridge (District of Columbia)
Posted January 11, 2020, by Luke

Unless a miracle happens, this bridge is a goner: https://wtop.com/dc/2020/01/ddot-decides-not-to-help-save-th...

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was wondering that myself Art🤔

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Stop shaking it. More than three shakes and your playing with it :^)

I still don't understand why Joel chose to beat on PENNDOT and accused them of being run by young whippersnappers based on a replacement that occurred 10 years ago.

Posted January 10, 2020, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is confirmed to still exist. Pic:

https://www.crestviewbulletin.com/news/20190622/locals-share...

Posted January 10, 2020, by Joel Windmiller (joelwindmiller [at] att [dot] net)

Old rppc card view of bridge over Sacramento River California 24

Posted January 10, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

A history of this crossing:

http://cnhillsborough.blogspot.com/2019/09/the-bridge-street...

Regards,

Art S.

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Luke

I don't think we're discussing, moreso ripping (Fart pun intended) on Joel for trying to blame young people for something they guaranteed had no part in.

A 25 year old would be a relatively recent college grad, and unless PennDOT had severe case of nepotism, would likely not be in an administrative position. And if it was an actual attempted dig at my generation, the eldest millennials (1981) would've been just graduating college, and the youngest (1996) just beginning high school. Ergo none of them would be in an administrative position anywhere to put a bridge on the chopping block.

Any way you shake it, it doesn't add up logically,

Posted January 10, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is this the corrected name of this tunnel,Luke?

Cheraw Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I prefer your photo. Please make it the Thumbnail

Mike Daffron
Posted January 10, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I am Dying LOL

Gen X for the win
Posted January 10, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sorry Melissa! You'll be DANCING WITH YOURSELF! LOL

Bridge Comment
Posted January 10, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Gen X for the Win

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nah, as baby boomers become old farts, the increase in the methane they release will help to accelerate global warming :^)

Thank god for global warming otherwise it would still be a cold country :^)

The warmer it gets, the less salt used... Iron bridge enthusiasts for global warming!!! ;^)

BTW, why are we discussing something that happened 10 years ago?

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Remember, we boomers won the Cold War so you younguns could live in a warm country!

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Ageism is for Dullards

Keep your ageism to yourself, or I'll break out the Boomer memes.

Tunnelton Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 10, 2020, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

PennDOT- the haters of historical truss bridges strikes again! Are they being run by 25 year olds? There dumb policy of destroying the old bridge at extra cost to the taxpayers instead of just leaving it in place for pedestrians seems more out of spite than anything else!

Posted January 10, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love it

Posted January 10, 2020, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What is this? On first look its a stringer or beam, but what with the weird truss/ lattice beams in that placement?

Posted January 10, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is a very attractive looking culvert. Glad to see theyíve made a point of taking care of it.

Posted January 9, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

An effort has been made to preserve this culvert including complete tuckpointing and through bolts.

Posted January 9, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Luke,it actually is a great idea for tunnels .Especially where it snows a lot like where this tunnel is.

Posted January 9, 2020, by Luke

Actually pretty common. Used to keep warm air in the tunnels during winter to prevent ice buildup

http://www.doorsbychoice.com/blog/147-year-old-belden-tunnel...

Posted January 9, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is that a roll-down door like on garages that I see on the entrance of the tunnel?You don't see that everyday!

Posted January 9, 2020, by Luke
Posted January 9, 2020, by Gene (genemills [at] outlook [dot] com)

Are there any photos of the original tunnel at this location? I haven't had a bit of luck finding any. Thanks.

Bort Road bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 9, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Are they even going to put a slab in? Maybe its a demo only, with no replacement?

Posted January 8, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Pretty obvious to me that this one came from elsewhere. I would suspect it dates to the early to mid 1890s, although it also could be slightly later than that. Nick, were you able to walk out on the bridge? If so, from what end? From your pictures, it looks like portions of both approaches have been destroyed. I would love to visit this bridge sometime...was the landowner friendly?

Posted January 8, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It is with much sadness that I must convey that this bridge has been destroyed. Driving Hunt Road on 2020-01-08 I saw a replacement UCEB.

Bort Road bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted January 8, 2020, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

And in typical "we don't care about historical bridges" fashion PA can't wait to replace it with an ugly boring cookie cutter cement slab! Guess I need to get out to this one before they destroy it!

Posted January 8, 2020, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

A sad loss. It's bad enough how man is destroying what little we have left of these beautiful structures then to see mother nature doing her evil work making it even worse!

Posted January 8, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

🤔 Somewhere there is a bridge...

Posted January 7, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love the new photos

Posted January 7, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It is rather vague at the moment!

Posted January 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Will there be any further information on this bridge?

Posted January 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This is a 1949 alignment of Missouri N.

Posted January 7, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Would it have been this one? (You would be correct that it's been replaced, if so.)

http://bridgehunter.com/ok/caddo/30560000000000/

Posted January 7, 2020, by Paula Trahan (Ktcooney2 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

This bridge was built by my Great Uncle, Grant Williams. He was raised in Harper County, OK and built many bridges throughout Ok and TX. This is Route 66 in 1930, not the one noted further to the north. Also, there is a companion bridge on 66 east of Weatherford built by him but it may be lost.

Posted January 6, 2020, by Luke

Apparently this particular Lattice pattern is called a "Remington patent", or so the Mormon literature on the builder says.

I know little about wooden truss construction or patents, but perhaps Will Truax is lurking and can shed some technical light on the subject.

Posted January 6, 2020, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is one of those bridges that truly has to be seen in person to fully appreciate. It has a lot of really interesting details as John mentioned. I really hope this one does not get demolished.

Posted January 6, 2020, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have often suspected that this bridge might be an amalgamation of spans from various locations. One of the reasons I suspected that is, as John Marvig mentions, this fridge is set on timber pylons as opposed to stone pylons.

I would not necessarily expect the railroad to mix truss types here, especially if the crossing was going to be a frequently used permanent structure. I would think that a railroad would just build three lattice trusses and be done with it unless the Pegram, with its longer span, offered an advantage.

Now that John mentions the Nebraska structure having two Pegram trusses I would not be surprised if both of those trusses ended up in Kansas. The Minneapolis Pegram being one and this Pegram being the other.

Now, we might want to think in terms of large plate girder bridges along the main line that might have been lattice trusses at one time. Unlike the main line spans, the lattice truss is on this bridge have not had their portal bracing modified. The lattice truss in Lindsborg has not had its portal bracing modified either.


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