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Posted October 28, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

This is The Pruitt Bridge BH 10470

Posted October 28, 2020, by Carroll Messer (cj [dot] messer [at] att [dot] net)

Six Beale Wagon Road Whipple Bowstring Arch Truss Iron Bridges in Indian Territory, 1859-60

1. Poteau River, 7.4 miles south of Fort Smith, just below the mouth of Cedar Creek (two-100 ft. spans), [ 35 17.00 N, 94 27.90 W ] [North lat., West long., degrees+minutes.]

2. Red Bank Creek, 4.6 miles west of Spiro (50 ft. span), [ 35 15.14 N, 94 42.13 W ]; (site found by Kyle Burch, Spiro OK in 2020)

3. Otter Creek, 1.4 miles southwest of Keota (50 ft. span), [ 35 14.45 N, 94 56.37 W ]

4. Sans Bois Creek, 0.6 miles northwest of Iron Bridge (100 ft. span), [ 35 14.54 N, 94 58.02 W ]

5. Emachaya Creek, 0.8 miles west of Whitefield (50 ft. span), [ 35 14.90 N, 95 15.07 W ]

6. Little River at Edwards Trading Post (100 ft. span), [ 35 0.44 N, 96 23.28 W ]

Posted October 28, 2020, by MoozOfDoomz (mooz [at] gmail [dot] com)

Very Cool!

Posted October 28, 2020, by JIM STEWART (CHURCHVILLE, NY) (JAMESENSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

ALTHOUGH THE POTEAU RIVER BRIDGE WAS TWO SPANS OF 100', THERE WERE A FEW 50' SPANS INCLUDED IN THE SAME DEAL. THE 100' SPANS WOULD HAVE BEEN NINE PANELS. 50' IS A LITTLE UNDER THE EXPECTED RANGE FOR A SEVEN PANEL TRUSS WHICH WAS 55' TO 75'. THE FIFTY FOOTERS IN THE BEALE ROAD PROJECT MIGHT HAVE BEEN FIVE PANELS. THERE WERE NOT VERY MANY FIVES. THERE WERE A FEW ON THE CHENANGO CANAL. THE WHIPPLE ARCH IN JAPAN IS FIVE PANELS.

Liverpool Township,Oh Medina county 1907-08 photo
Posted October 28, 2020, by Paul Oehlberg (bsaxon [at] ameritech [dot] net)

I recently purchased a RPPC of this covered bridge over the Rocky River, the sender notes he shingled it last year then in 1908 it was replaced with a steel bridge. Any help identifying the span?

Posted October 27, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great added photos! In the first photo, this bridge appears to have one distinctive feature: a (somewhat lazy) guard dog.

Posted October 27, 2020, by DRussell (evildog46 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Before they removed the dam that was just down river, this bridge was often jumped off of by local teens. Locally called, ďThe TrestleĒ. As in, ďLetís meet at ďthe trestleĒ and weíll jump into the water.Ē

Posted October 27, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes! This is a HIGHLIGHT!

Posted October 27, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

John, it's one of my favorites and I'd Love for you to photograph it !

Posted October 27, 2020, by Anonymous

So what's notable about a bridge from 1984?

Posted October 27, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It appears that about 70% of the truss portion of this bridge is in Indiana.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is the bridge in question. "Doomed" tag was placed on it as early as 2013.

Posted October 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I canít confirm anything, but I looked a little further. Apparently $7M was earmarked for a replacement of the back channel bridge nearby. I canít imagine $7M covers replacement of this bridge. I would expect this size bridge to be around $50M if not far more. There are two documents put out by the IL DOT, neither which is real clear. Iím going to guess the $7M is going towards the back channel bridge, and the lesser amount towards engineering studies (as seen in the other document).

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/Assets/uploads/files/Transporta...

Iím really hoping this one isnít on the chopping block. Iím not sure if I can get down there this winter, but I would love to hit it. It is a very unique and important structure in the area.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

It seems that bridges across the Wabash at the state line are always a problem. Illinois owns most of the river and has to pay for the bridge in most cases. Because of that there are few highway bridges across the southern Wabash and bridges like the New Harmony bridge and this one. New Harmony was built by a federally chartered company and this bridge was a strange example of a private person taking ownership of an existing bridge and re-purposing it from a rail bridge to a highway. I'm not sure what the motivation was for Illinois to get involved. Maybe they were just embarrassed that such a need was not being met in this area.

Howard Road Bridge (Rhode Island)
Posted October 27, 2020, by Adam (a071499 [at] fmr [dot] com)

...is now being rebuilt/is not intact.

Posted October 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted October 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge appears to still be intact in 1981, gone in 1994, but then a new one in place by 1999. This seems unusual, especially considering the truss bridge collapsed. Aerials very clearly show the old truss bridge in 1966 and 1981.

Posted October 27, 2020, by JIM STEWART (CHURCHVILLE, NY) (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

IN 2012, I INPUT SOME INFO. TO LOCATE THE BIO. NOTICE OF JOHN W. MURPHY WHICH DID NOT PRODUCE RESULTS DIRECTLY. I APOLOGIZE FOR THAT.

J. OF THE FRANKLIN CONSIDERED VOL. 67 TO BE JAN-JUN OF 1874 AND VOL. 68 TO BE JUL-DEC OF 1874. DEPENDING ON THE SOURCE LIBRARY THESE TWO VOLUMES MAY HAVE BEEN BOUND AS A SINGLE VOLUMES. THUS A SEARCH FOR MURPHY WOULD FIND THE PAPER.

THE PAPER IS IN VOL. 68, NO. 5, NOVEMBER 1874, PAGES 303--310.

JFI IS ON LINE AT MORE THAN ONE SOURCE (GOOGLE BOOKS, HATHI, ETC.

GOOD LUCK. PLEASE, LET ME KNOW IF THIS WORKS.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Luke

It is the same bridge. Thank you very much for posting it and the website!

Posted October 27, 2020, by David Swift (davidandrewswift69 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I believe I may have found a better picture of this long gone bridge. See uploaded file. The source of file is as follows> https://thelensofhistory.com/directory/root-samuel/

Posted October 27, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow, thatís a huge bummer. I havenít seen any official news releases about it, but Iím sure that is coming. The only redeeming possibility is that specific program has a large budget shortfall due to COVID, so maybe it buys this bridge some time.

It would be nice if they would leave the old bridge standing, especially since it is a landmark

Klingle Valley Bridge (District of Columbia)
Posted October 27, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

This is already listed as Connecticut Avenue Bridge BH 12241

C&O Canal Bridge (District of Columbia)
Posted October 27, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

This is already listed as Wisconsin Avenue Bridge BH 12274

Posted October 27, 2020, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This pony truss is now ready for triple railings that provide a walkway and a vehicle passage. The middle rail can be removed if a wider vehicle is required. The engineering was interesting as it had special requirements for a farmer, four houses and the historic location. Altered foroading but every part is essential to the whole. If we are to continue saving these bridges alteration is one way. Bach Steel is the fabricator on all our projects with engineering by Jim Schiffer.

You can see Pennsylvania from there.

Posted October 27, 2020, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Walked it several times. I couldn't see over the railings to see the wonderful McKenzie River. The differences in 6 years and you can see why Hayden was moved from the transcontinental railroad in Corrine Utah because it was so light compared to Armitage

Posted October 26, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Back in Indiana now Mike, but indeed had a wonderful trip! Yes this bridge is a mammoth and must be seen in person to fully appreciate it. It was getting late by the time we made it into Salem so I decided not to bother you. Definitely intend to come back that way in a year or two and we will have to plan to meet up!

Posted October 26, 2020, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Tony,

I'm glad you took the time to check this bridge out. No picture ever does this truss justice. It really is huge.

I hope you're enjoying your west coast swing!

Mike

Posted October 26, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Illinois DOT has announced plans to replace this bridge main span and overflow span starting in 2021.

http://www.idot.illinois.gov/Assets/uploads/files/Transporta...

Posted October 26, 2020, by Tom Haas (tkhaas [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Could it have been intended to connect Doyne Park to the open grassy area east of the north end of the bridge? For fishing in the river?

Posted October 26, 2020, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

On top of every thing else the bus was 8.4 inches too tall. You can see the height sign pushed back as it went under the first tower.

Posted October 26, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Satolli, thanks again for the video! Loved it!

Posted October 26, 2020, by Craig F (craig [at] fenter [dot] com)

From what I understand as of October 2020. The Fort Griffin bridge is no longer functional, and has not been for some time. Although it is on a county road, travel there is discouraged for reasons explained below.

I inquired about the bridge at the Fort Griffin Historic Site visitors center, and I quote; "although the road is county road, the bridge is not passable, this would force you to turn around on private land." Apparently the landowner has seen some issues with trespassing and vandalism at the Fort Griffin town site, which is apparently on private land just before the bridge.

I drove to the area, and can confirm the road does not appear maintained beyond the residence entrance on the road prior to the bridge. Note: I did not leave the county road.

I did not continue to the bridge site or even the town site, though I could clearly see the buildings. Out of respect for the landowner I did not pursue visiting the bridge.

Posted October 26, 2020, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a video on the bridge I just posted a couple of days ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AHrH1ROedc&t=160s

Posted October 26, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I think you are correct Nathan. I'm not seeing any gusset plates.

Posted October 26, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I think this bridge might be welded instead of riveted, but it appears to date to when the dam was built in 1952.

Bridge Projects that Displaced Residents
Posted October 26, 2020, by James Feigenbaum (jamesf [at] bu [dot] edu)

Hi all,

I hope this is okay to post here as it isn't about a specific bridge.

I'm an economic historian (https://www.nber.org/people/james_feigenbaum) and I'm starting a new project studying the long-run effects of infrastructure-based displacement in the US. As an example, the construction of the Triborough Bridge led to the destruction of many apartment buildings (or nearer to BU where I work, the creation of the Quabbin reservoir flooded four MA towns).

I'm wondering if the experts here at bridgehunter.com would have other leads on bridges that, like the Triborough, displaced residents when they were built. The ideal examples would be bridges built pre-1940 (so that I can follow affected people in the census) and bigger bridges in urban areas are likely to generate more displacement. PWA bridges, for example?

Thanks so much!

James

Posted October 26, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Melissa,

Thanks for taking the time to look, I appreciate it!

Posted October 25, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've been digging around looking for a similar plaque or cresting, but so far have nothing. Haven't seen a plaque with that shape before... to the best of my recollection. Also, the small medallion that hangs down from the portal is quite unusual.

Posted October 25, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I suspect someone can identify the portal and plaque in the photograph.

Posted October 25, 2020, by Tyler

This page is for the old bridge but most of the photos are of the replacement bridge. This should be split to two pages

Posted October 25, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Nathan, I spent several hours yesterday in search of a photo or information on the removal of the bridge. I was unsuccessful.

Posted October 25, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Wow, this is an interesting (and a little shocking) history, you would think such an infamous bridge might have a photo somewhere. I assume the article Luke found references a previous bridge at this location.

Posted October 25, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The county is going to close this bridge to traffic due to deterioration and then next year waste taxpayer dollars to demolish the bridge for no reason in 2021. I sound like a broken record, but even with deterioration, but it could be left standing for pedestrians or closed to even pedestrians as a monument. God forbid they let the bridge continue standing. https://www.newstribune.com/news/local/story/2020/oct/25/col...

Posted October 25, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Patrick,

In my narrative for this bridge on HistoricBridges.org I have a discussion of this, since I noticed the broad similarities to Morison as well, but a historical article provides full details on this newer-than-expected truss. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=n...

Posted October 24, 2020, by Luke

I've noticed that if you have the + in the first coord, it'll give you wonky results.

Posted October 24, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Entering the degrees/minutes/seconds worked this time, as opposed to the decimal degrees.

The oldest image is 1956, at which point it's already gone - but, the road is also clearly identifiable. That suggests to me that whatever happened, happened close to then.

The nearby State Route 1/US 64/US 70/US 79 bridge doesn't help much, as that apparently dates to 1926, per the NBI - or at the very least, *something* at that spot dates to 1926. SR 1, per Wiki, dates to 1915 - maybe it used this road for its first 10 years until being re-routed the way it is now?

Posted October 24, 2020, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tyler,

Fair point. Thanks.

Patrick

Posted October 24, 2020, by Luke

Predecessor was a steel truss according to the NBI

Posted October 24, 2020, by Clarence Nelson (nelsond [at] ameritech [dot] net)

I haven't been on this site in years. It was a work time deviation. I recently visited Branson, MO and when I saw the Lake Taneycomo I instantly thought of the open spandrel bridges built by Conde McCullough in Oregon. As I tried to explain this to my wife, it was then that I knew that I was a bridge nerd and needed to get back to this site after an almost 7 year absence.

Posted October 24, 2020, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Definitely not a Pony Truss. I believe this bridge has been here for 26 years.

Posted October 24, 2020, by Clarence Nelson (nelsond [at] ameritech [dot] net)

I just drove this bridge from about a week. There is an RV camp off to the west of the north side of the bridge. Lots of traffic and a busy traffic circle on the south side of the bridge.

Posted October 24, 2020, by Doug K

I added a link to the Web Archive page for the news article- direct link has no access.

Looking at old topo maps, 2 miles southeast from 1906 Janesville shows Spring Brook a likely crossing.

Posted October 24, 2020, by Larry Lanberg (10ldlanberg [at] gmail [dot] com)

"Was extant as late as August 1969."

Needs correction. Perhaps you meant August 1989??

That little bridge was DEFINITELY there through the 1980's. Source: I drove & walked through it many times!

I believe that the bridge was removed at the same time that the Robert E. Lee bridge was replaced. (Early 90's? Something like that.).

Posted October 24, 2020, by Luke
Posted October 24, 2020, by Philip C Walker (pcwalker [dot] tx [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was widened from it's original design to accommodate the widening of US81/US79 that was routed through here. There is another bridge that pre-dates this one, but it was used only to cross the creek. It appears to still be there. There's quite a few of these concrete bridges sitting abandoned throughout Williamson County that once was used for what was then SH 2.

Posted October 23, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1960 Bartlett 15' quad shows the road intact but the bridge is missing and marked "Bridge Out".

https://prd-tnm.s3.amazonaws.com/StagedProducts/Maps/Histori...

The bridge was the scene of a murder and lynching but other than marking the location it was not directly involved in either. There is a marker memorializing the lynching:

https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=103638

A very detailed account of the events near the bridge in 1917:

https://lynchingsitesmem.org/files/attachments/post/vandiver...

Posted October 23, 2020, by Tyler

Not Nathan, but itís missing the extra solid plate attached to the sides of the portal bracing that other Morrison bridges have. Compare this to the Morrison designed Bellefontaine bridge https://bridgehunter.com/mo/st-louis/bellefontaine/

Posted October 23, 2020, by Patrick Gurwell (pgurwell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

After looking at the comments on the Armitage Bridge, do you think this bridge could be a Morison designed bridge?

Posted October 23, 2020, by Bill Eaton

Came across a photo of the 1921 Cache Creek Bridge (Highway 99W) in the August, 1938 issue of California Highways & Public Works.

Posted October 23, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Blah, and HA is being screwy again.

Tried this location, and a Kansas location that I did use yesterday - both times I got dumped into Random Spanish/Portuguese Land again. >_<

Posted October 23, 2020, by Fred Tefft (fradt [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge structure is moved to the south side of 94th street on the west side of Little Soldier Creek.

Posted October 23, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Articles online show that this bridge is being extended with a new modular pedestrian bridge to cross the active railroad tracks, and this bridge will be reused as part of that crossing. However, it appears the original floor system may have been cut out and replaced? (see photo 2 on the article below)

https://journalstar.com/lifestyles/recreation/three-years-la...

Posted October 23, 2020, by Luke

I"m trying to find a picture of it, but I uncovered that the bridge was the site of the horrific May 22nd, 1917 lynching of Eli Persons, who was lit aflame, dismembered, and what little remained of him was left for public display on Beale Street.

Dobson Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 23, 2020, by Anonymous

*Alabama (not Georgia)

Posted October 23, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Can anyone help solve this mystery? We are trying to learn what type of bridge used to sit on these piers. This surviving pier actually sits back a ways from the main river so it may have been a large bridge.

Posted October 23, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted October 22, 2020, by K. Allen Ballard (speedeeprint [at] gmail [dot] com)

Being a city alderman for 18 years has given me some idea of legalities regarding roads, alleys, infrastructure and more. I can tell you our small town has only rarely ever abandoned maybe a couple of alleyways let alone a road or former piece of city property.

I can tell you that unless the county commissioners specifically abandoned (in a public meeting) all right of ways and possession of this bridge then it remains in county hands.

Think about it, what private entity would assume liability for this bridge or the roads on either end. A landowner might claim to own such roads or access to discourage unnecessary incursions by curious parties, but in legal point of fact that claim should be backed up by public record (meeting notes) and a legal description tranfer from the county to a landowner or interested party. That transfer should be recorded in the County Courthouse by the Recorder of Deeds.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Ed Regan (beregan [at] iwvisp [dot] com)

The postcard photo is connected to the Main St. bridge over the Red Lake River in Crookston, MN. However, the card's caption reads "...Thief River Falls" What goes?

Posted October 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, I'm not sure where the Massillon label came from, but I corrected the builders info.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The most massive Whipple I have ever seen!

Posted October 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Still looking good!

Posted October 22, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Was just told by a local at the Goodpasture Covered Bridge that the Belknap Covered Bridge was not lost in the wildfire last month. Due to conditions and work crews I decided not to drive to it.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tom's suspicions were correct, per James Cooper's notes this bridge does indeed date to 1929.

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=i...

Posted October 22, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

According to James Cooper's notes, the through truss actually was built by Rochester and the pony truss is a Vincennes product. I am not sure why Massillon is listed on Bridgehunter?

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=i...

Posted October 22, 2020, by Doug K

NBI info locates to this same spot, but with a 1967 concrete Tee-beam of similar dimensions owned by the county. Was this bridge replaced or ??

Dobson Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 22, 2020, by Anonymous

Bridge marketing was successful through PennDOT/SHPO marketing program. Was removed to be relocated to private property in Georgia.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Tyler

Fixed

Posted October 22, 2020, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

We found out today that the Henline Creek Bridge was lost in the Beachie Creek Fire on Labor Day. The bridge was owned by the U.S. Forest Service.

While not an overly notable bridge, it certainly was a great example of timber bridge construction used in the forests of the Pacific Northwest.

https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/news/2020/10/04/orego...

Posted October 22, 2020, by Garrett DiDomizio (garrettdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Still a fun little bridge to drive over. I usually do after church or after stopping at the nearby gas station.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Diane Dow (DeeBugKat [at] gmail [dot] com)

The current overview:

Pony truss bridge over Big Choconut Creek on Front Street in Endicott

Should be updated to read:

Pony truss bridge over Big Choconut Creek on Front Street in Vestal.

Posted October 22, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmmm. Its NBI history has it still open in 2000, 2004 it's closed, 2008 it's no longer even listed.

The aerial for this location in 2003 shows no crossing at all - the most recent one prior to that is 1991, which shows a crossing.

Maybe it really did wash out? Which would seem more likely - closing it, then removing it and just leaving the road dead-ended all within just a few-year span at most, or it washing out and it then being decided to leave the road dead-ended?

Posted October 22, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Moved the pin onto the road - I'm thinking this was replaced with a culvert around 2010. The aerials seem to support that, as does this disappearing from the NBI after 2009.

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Street view

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Looks like it's been removed and replaced with a low water crossing

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Directions in description take you to this spot - on 2nd Rd. just east of Jayhawk Rd, looks like its been removed/washed away

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

There is no water crossing or open or closed bridge at this dropped pin

Posted October 21, 2020, by DENNIS KIENZLER (gecko1941 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Slated for replacement spring of 2021

Posted October 21, 2020, by Jay

From the St. Louis Globe-Democrat (St. Louis, Missouri) ∑ 24 Mar 1903, Tue ∑ Page 2

Posted October 21, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

George,

The bridge is set up for it and they have done so in the past. I'm not sure when/why its alternating vs. bi-directional. The biggest challenge with alternating is that it's a quarter mile long, including the approaches, so it takes a while to clear between a change in traffic direction.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 21, 2020, by Ashley (bamaashleynyc [at] gmail [dot] com)

Can anyone tell me if this bridge is operating currently (October 2020) - earlier this summer it was often down due to lack of personnel due to Covid. Please advise. Thank you!

Posted October 21, 2020, by Ashley (bamaashleynyc [at] gmail [dot] com)

Can anyone tell me if this bridge is operating currently (October 2020) - earlier this summer it was often down due to lack of personnel due to Covid. Please advise. Thank you!

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Estimated new location: https://goo.gl/maps/553QQHwFtpjNpqx6A

38.209827, -86.118508

Posted October 21, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I must have missed this project in the INDOT Bidding, but it seems this bridge has already been restored and moved to Rice Island in Corydon! I field visited the bridge in May 28, 2019 and there was no sign of construction so this project began sometime after that. https://www.corydondemocrat.com/2020/10/21/bridge-65-gets-ne...

Posted October 21, 2020, by mark boettcher (markwboettcher [at] gmail [dot] com)

Two photos from 1999

Posted October 20, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,i see what you are talking about and alternating traffic is a great idea.Do you think it's possible they would use alternating traffic on this bridge?

Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

George,

My point was a bit more basic. There really isn't room for two lanes. Yes, cars pass each other but most pull in their mirrors. That's why alternating traffic makes sense. With the width of lines (double, I assume...) we're down to 7 foot wide lanes.

My concern is this will force replacement.

Regards,

Art S.

Wolf Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

https://www.pennlive.com/news/2020/10/cumberland-county-deto...

Cumberland County detour starts Oct. 26 for bridge-replacement project

Updated Oct 20, 9:58 AM; Posted Oct 19, 1:36 PM

By Steve Marroni | smarroni@pennlive.com

Residents of Middlesex Township can expect a month-long detour starting next week as crews replace a bridge that has been closed for seven years.

Cumberland County officials say a new detour for the project to replace the Wolf Bridge will begin on Oct. 26.

The intersection of Wolf Bridge Road and Clemson Drive will be closed to allow for the construction of tie-ins to the new bridge. That part of the project will take three to four weeks and will take drivers on a four-mile detour on Clemson Drive, North Middlesex Road, and West Middlesex Drive.

Wolf Bridge closed in September 2013 when an annual inspection revealed extensive deterioration.

The 192-foot-long, steel-truss bridge was built in 1895 and had a 10-ton weight limit, carrying about 2,000 vehicles per day over the Conodoguinet Creek, prior to its closing.

The estimated $3 million construction cost will be entirely funded by federal funds.

County officials say itís part of the Cumberland County Bridge Capital Improvement Plan that includes more than $30 million of bridge replacement or repair projects on all 28 county-owned bridges. The primary funding source comes from the county approved $5 per vehicle registration fee. Since 2015, the fee has generated approximately $1.1 million per year, allowing the county to address its bridge needs.

Posted October 20, 2020, by George A Oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,that doesn't make no sense painting the steel grating on the bridge with yellow paint.From what i see it doesn't last long.What they should have done was put something like a porous material wide enough and also flat in the middle of the bridge which would show the yellow paint instead of just painting the steel grating.Also make it reflective for nighttime driving on the bridge.Just an idea which in my eyes makes sense.

Posted October 20, 2020, by Christina Beaulieu

What year did they stop collecting tolls?

Wolf Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 20, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

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