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Posted July 6, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I classified this as a Howe truss on my website I don't know why its listed as a "multiple kingpost" here, as far as I know that's a truss design unique to covered bridges, which this bridge is not.

Posted July 6, 2020, by Luke

Found the article the now-gone blog hosted a clipping of.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/305057000/

Posted July 6, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like there is at least a couple secondhand spans in the rebuild of this bridge.

Posted July 6, 2020, by Justin (Jkp972214 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is no longer open to traffic but it does still stand.

Posted July 6, 2020, by Tom Hoffman

James, with those photos do you know, or does anyone else know if the bridge is in the process of being rehabbed. It's a rather neat long span that's kind of a humpback bridge.

Posted July 6, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Still leads to the question of who built it. Very unique structure.

Posted July 6, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

A BHC Pic of the Week, taken from Sandcastle Waterpark in 2018: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/07/06/bhc...

Posted July 6, 2020, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Buddy was on this one yesterday, now closed to traffic with barricades....said still ok for pedestrians and 2 wheelers

Posted July 6, 2020, by Tyler
Posted July 6, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's rather unusual to see a metal Multiple-Kingpost truss instead of a Pratt. I'm not one proficient at dating photos by people's clothing, but if I had to guess I'd say that pic is from the 20's or 30's. This is a unique little span that deserves to be rehabilitated for reuse.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Punching this location into Historic Aerials, there aren't that many views available for this area.

The 1995 aerial is really bad, but might be suggestive of the bridge already having been removed. By 2003, it's definitely gone.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Jay Bissell

As of June, 2020, any remnants of a roadway have long since washed away.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I agree John, I've always felt like this one was relocated here.

Posted July 5, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one looks to be a recycled span originally built for railroad use. It is unusual to see laced endposts on a span like this.

Little River Bridge (South Carolina)
Posted July 5, 2020, by Paul Zeuke (kb2crk [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is gone. A new concrete bridge is almost complete

Snyder Road Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted July 5, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

According to the boyfriend of my fiancée's niece who lives in Pennsburg,Pa this bridge is still closed.He didn't know if anything was being done with this bridge.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

That is correct - actually, it looks like the replacement was finished ahead of schedule, at the very end of 2016. So, demolition of this would have been at the beginning of 2017.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Tony,

I'm a fan of most of the early builders but you're right, I have a special affinity for CBW. By the 1880s they were oldest bridge company in business. Together with Roebling, the last of the pre-civil war builders. In addition to their age was their innovation and diversity.

They built:

- stone arches,

- wood/covered bridges,

- all sorts or innovative iron trusses,

- suspension bridges,

and I have evidence that they built railroad bridges as well as road bridges. In my opinion, they were the most diverse of all bridge builders, exceeding even Bollman.

Considering D.H. Morrison was born in 1817, he was in his mid 60s when he died in 1882. I'm not sure I would consider that to be young for the 1800s.

Although he wasn't young, I think David Morrison's death was untimely for both for him and CBW. The company was spooling up well during the last years of his life. They may have missed a beat as a result of the reorganization caused by his passing. His sons did well and remained innovative throughout the decade but were smaller than King and WIBCo.

I'm not sure if they were stretched thin because they were expanding to compete or another issue but the company wasn't able to survive a major incident, the Mather's Mills tragedy. This seems to have triggered the financial collapse.

I look forward to continuing our quest of long lost history!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Stephen,

Thanks for the heads up that the trusses have been removed. It is my understanding that the trusses are safe.

Sincerely,

Art S.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Paul Zeuke (kb2crk [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Looks like the old bridge is gone from a satellite view.

Posted July 5, 2020, by Stephen B Bender (sbbender [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi -

Just looked for this bridge in July 2020, among others on the Conestoga Creek. It has unfortunately been replaced by a modern bridge, by the looks of it a couple years ago.

Posted July 5, 2020, by j

the bridge has been replaced

John Blue Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted July 5, 2020, by Warren Jenkins (wwjenkins77 [at] verizon [dot] net)

Doomed

Cumberland Times-News, 7/5/2020

Posted July 4, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Coincidentally, I’ve had a gentleman asking about catching a train over this bridge. Do you remember what time the train came over?

Posted July 4, 2020, by Tyler

Did a site visit and added pictures and a description. No date or plaque exists on the bridge.

Posted July 4, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

I got really lucky when I visited this bridge - I heard a train whistle in the distance. So I waited, and captured the video of a train crossing the bridge that I've now posted here. The still photo of the train I also posted, is captured from the video.

The new Rock County park northeast of the bridge, provides great views of the bridge. Lighting conditions for photography are poor in the afternoon - best in morning or under an overcast sky. Presently, getting to that park is a little complicated, since the adjacent South Smith Road Bridge is closed.

Posted July 4, 2020, by Bob Kalal (k [dot] kalal [at] comcast [dot] net)

Jacksonville Illinois, Chicago and Alton, Illinois Central Gulf Railroad, Illinois Central

StreetView
Posted July 4, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmm, we're seeing embeds again.

Posted July 4, 2020, by Luke

It's not a mystery. 1) It's still there behind the gatehouse. 2) It was built in the 1890 along with everything but the more notable 1912 mansion.

Posted July 4, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

DOOMED!

The county is hell bent on replacing this bridge. Plans are in late stages. Cost is no object.

Art S.

Posted July 4, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Tony - I guess my edit didn't take...I added that the bridge was bought used in 1933 from Erie County.

Posted July 3, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

I wrote a mystery article on this bridge and the search is on to find out where it was located and when it was built, together with the search for information on the families that had occupied the estate: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2020/07/02/mys...

Posted July 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah, I'd rather it be a Bowstring or Whipple... But it beats the Hell outta a slab!

Posted July 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Although anything is possible, a pinned Pratt with cresting built in 1933 is highly improbable. My guess is that the bridge was either moved here at that time, or the substructure was otherwise manipulated.

Posted July 3, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cool, Tony! You got your own bridge!

Posted July 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm leaning towards Buckeye Bridge Works on this one. WIBCo used heavier double-laced verticals on the two examples of their non-tubular Bowstrings that I've seen. They also didn't run their rods through the top cover plate like BBW did. Obviously, there's a very small sample pool to go by on either.

South Fulton Avenue Bascule Bridge
Posted July 3, 2020, by Douglas Butler

The Fulton Avenue South Bridge is already added!!!!!

Posted July 3, 2020, by Jonas (Jroach805 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Where is “the west portal” and can I still get in in 2020?

Posted July 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Of course the skew on this beauty is crazy... but the placement of the date plaques is just bizarre!

Posted July 2, 2020, by Nick Boppel (nickboppel01 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Okay, I found out what exactly is going on with the so-called rehabilitation of this bridge (so-called because according to this source, this isn't the first time it's been delayed).

https://www.conwaydailysun.com/news/local/nhdot-returns-whit...

Curry Run Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted July 2, 2020, by Matthew E Pingor (wewhoare [at] gmail [dot] com )

This bridge was replaced around 2016-18. A friend of mine has a camp right there. It is now a concrete span.

Posted July 2, 2020, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It appears that most of the bridge is welded together.

Posted July 2, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Matt, agree lol, and any other communicable diseases

Posted July 2, 2020, by Matt Lohry

If you sit on that couch you will automatically become immune to coronavirus.

Posted July 2, 2020, by Desiree Cates (desireecates7 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a large plaque near the bridge that says the bridge was built in 1914.

Posted July 2, 2020, by Desiree Cates (desireecates7 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a large plaque near the bridge that says the bridge was built in 1914.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Let's hope they do the same fantastic job as they did on the Stones Keep Bridge! (Last 4 pics)

http://bridgehunter.com/va/montgomery/12363/

Posted July 1, 2020, by Mike D (Nascarfan77 [at] live [dot] com)

Signs up stating June 29 2020 bridge will be closed.

barricades are at the end of the road but have yet to be placed to block the road this week. Do no know if this is a bridge replacement or repair/restoration like the nearby bridge in Elliston-Lafayette. I shall keep an eye on what is going on with this bridge

Posted July 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Truss bridges make for great antennas!

Posted July 1, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I walked across the bridge with no problem but the Skew gives me anxiety lol

Posted July 1, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

BTW, the TV is still on the Rattlesnake Bridge up here in Owen Co....

Posted July 1, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

I imagine the couch is now in the possession of some lucky schmuck proud of his/her bridge artifact! BTW, LOVE the crazy skew on this sucker!!

Posted July 1, 2020, by Luke

I'd say you're on the money, Douglas.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Douglas W. Jones (douglas-w-jones [at] uiowa [dot] edu)

I recently uploaded an image to Wikimedia Commons that I am convinced is of this bridge under construction circa 1898. See:

-- https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Burlington_and_Weste...

I've consulted with the editor of the Burlington Railroad Historical Society, who sent the photo to me from the BRHS collection. The evidence for identifying the photo with this bridge is as follows:

1) barely discernable, the photo shows the B&W narrow gauge train to be on dual gauge track. This constrains it to being on the BCR&N track from Burlington to Mediapolis.

2) Looking at the photo, the distance between the stone abutments is hard to estimate, but it's perhaps 3 times the length of the M&STL box car that's on the bridge. The car is perhaps 35 feet long, suggesting a bridge length of 90 to 120 feet. Looking at the bridges on the line, this limits it to RI - Dry Branch Creek Bridges #1-3. No others are in this length range.

3) Looking closely at the stonework, you can see that the two stone abutments are angled away from the camera to the left. This rules out Dry Branch Bridge #2, where the angle would be to the right.

4) The surviving original stonework for Dry Branch Bridge #3 looks wrong, without the thin on top of medium on top of thicker easily visible in the photo.

5) Both Dry Branch Bridge #1 and #3 are on broad curves of the rail line to the left. The telephone pole on the far side of the creek has a prop on the left side appropriate for such a curve.

6) The view along the valley ahead of the train shows no topography. That's what I'd expect at Bridge #1, where the setting is at a branch in the valley with streams that end up paralleling the tracks on both sides and no hills rise for 0.2 miles, so scattered trees can hide them. At Bridge #3, the valley is narrower, I would expect hills.

Now, about the photo: It's obvious that the BCR&N tracks are on a wood trestle and that the new abutments have been built around that trestle and new fill has been placed behind the abutments, partially burying the trestle. Out in mid channel, there's timber cribwork holding up the trestle. Presumably, that's temporary support while the center pier of the two-span bridge is being built. They're clearly not ready to bring in the ironwork yet for this bridge.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Fully intact in 1995 aerial view. Appears to be partially dismantled in 2004 view, and completely gone by 2008.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

The alignment was the Santa Fe (ATSF) Hamlin Sub, still active as late as 1989, but haven't found anything else about it.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I added this bridge because so many people on this website have been good at digging up historical photos and info about long lost bridges. This bridge was in the middle of nowhere so it might be a challenge. But it was a large bridge over a major river. I am sure it was a railroad bridge because we know the previous 1901 highway bridge in this area was closer to the existing highway bridges.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Bowstring-like slope of these trusses reminds me of the old Bordeaux Bridge in Nashville. Only one span of that beauty remains over the Collins River.

http://bridgehunter.com/tn/warren/collins-river/

Posted July 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wait, what??? I was hoping to try that couch out after a long trip down there! 😂

Posted July 1, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

This is still on my list to see !

Posted July 1, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

The couch is gone ? LOL

Posted July 1, 2020, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Alright Grant!! Great to see you having a good time checking out some of the goodies around the state!

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Spectacular bridge! Reminds me closely of Boner Bridge in nearby warrick county. When visited in March 2020, the road was nearly flooded and water was rushing! I would suggest reviewing flood stages before going to see this bridge.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Late November 2019. Bridge is looking rather festive!

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Beautiful and scenic! Wish they would do something about the graffiti though!

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

A bridge with a very serene and scenic view for sure! Not a bad drive from civilization all things considered! The unique design is quite appealing! I would think twice before stepping on the bridge though as an approach on one side is falling apart and many chunks of concrete can be seen in the river.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Anonymous

Im sorry, I meant to post those on the Wheeling covered bridge page. Anyways, both of these Gibson county covered bridges are looking great after some tlc! I hated seeing all graffiti on old red covered bridge before! These photos were taken right before the paint and maintenance in March of 2020 as well.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

March 2020 before refurbishment and landscaping

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Loved seeing these 2 beautifully restored structures! The patoka wildlife refuge has so many treats to offer to bridge fanatics like myself!

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Had to go see these beauties! They are beautifully restored and not too bad of a drive from the main road! Love that these were preserved!!

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Went for a midnight drive to this bridge! A new coat of paint and some security measures were all that it took to make this bridge really shine! One of my favorites!

Posted June 30, 2020, by Grant DiDomizio (grantdidomizio [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just went by to see the finished rehab and paint work! It looks marvelous and it’s nice to see these bridges getting some love. Had to hurry with pictures and go as there was huge storm passing through the area. Be careful and watch for flood water when approaching.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you Art for your interest in CBW, and relentlessness in finding some of the answers! They were without doubt one of the most unique and innovative firms of their time, and I expect many more lost spans remain to be found. I've always felt that if David Morrison hadn't died at a relatively young age, his company might well have prospered for much longer than it did. I've been a fan ever since my visit to the Tom's Run Bridge many years ago.

So we'll keep looking for them... and keep the banter going! 😜

And yes, so far your track record is pretty impressive! 😎

Posted June 30, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks to both of you!

We still need too fill in a lot of details, but a least we're on the right track.

Regards to both,

Art S.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Melissa,

No worries. The town has an interesting history especially with bridges. Hope you can create the listings for some or all of them.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I will assume that the salt water air was responsible for roaching out the struts and upper lateral bracing.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Luke

Thanks, I've never seen one with the "deck" missing.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Effie McDermott (effie [at] gotopismo [dot] com)

Built in 1913, demolished in 2020.

Steel Truss structure lifted off the base and placed on the ground on June 29, 2020, in process of demolition.

Gaviota Pass Steel Bridge c1912
Posted June 30, 2020, by Effie McDermott (effie [at] gotopismo [dot] com)

This photo was posted on Facebook as Gaviota Pass 1912

Posted June 30, 2020, by Douglas W. Jones (douglas-w-jones [at] uiowa [dot] edu)

That's not a stone deck over the rails. Just a line of heavy stone along each edge of the rail deck. The deck is solid rails laid side to side, with ballast over the top. The stone sides are to retain the ballast.

Posted June 30, 2020, by Douglas W. Jones (douglas-w-jones [at] uiowa [dot] edu)

This culvert is over one branch of Rapid Creek. I've examined numerous rail-topped culverts of the BCR&N, topped with old 65# rail built on Cedar Valley Quarry limestone blocks. This is the only such culvert I've examined that has 2 spans with an intermediate pier, and the only one I've examined that was built under what must have been 2 or 3 parallel tracks, and the only one I've examined that is on a diagonal to the centerline of the former track. In addition, it is the only one I've examined with two layers of rail. One layer is perependicular to the axis of the culvert, the other is parallel to the line of the track.

Posted June 30, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed the entrance to the tunnel looked damaged in some of the pictures.Was there a freight train accident at the entrance to the tunnel?

Posted June 30, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see the Struble Trail is mentioned.Would this trail be connected to Struble Lake?

Posted June 30, 2020, by SCOTT Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you ! My mom found it and gave it to me for my birthday a while ago !

Posted June 30, 2020, by Douglas W. Jones (douglas-w-jones [at] uiowa [dot] edu)

All the RI - Dry Branch Creek Bridges were built by the Burlington Cedar Rapids and Northern RR, at a time when the Burlington and Northwestern Ry (narrow gauge, it's in Wikipedia) had running rights on this part of the line. This particuar bridge is unusual for the line, with lots of brick in the foundations. Most of the BCR&N bridges were built with stone block foundations using stone from the Cedar Valley quarry (served by the line, of course).

Posted June 30, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, I found a aerial photo of the replacement to this bridge. I mistakenly added it to this page. I have not made a page for the replacement.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, I'm Thrilled you solved the mystery. Thanks for letting me help. It was fun as always.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

And this is why I'm behind in my work and probably won't sleep enough tonight. But it was fun!

Found it in a book called "First Century of Piqua, Ohio"

along with two Columbia Bridge Co.

Must admit, I was quite surprised how accurate my 'educated guess,' based on Melissa's finds, was.

There are a ton of other bridges in the book if someone wants to post them. I'm probably done for the night - 3 CBW confirmations is enough for the day... :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's a cool pic Scott!

Posted June 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Glad I inspired you! 😜

Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Solved it!

Posted June 29, 2020, by SCOTT Ash (sash5282 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My grandfather John Childers took this picture from in front of the Riviera trailer park he owned back then,it’s storage buildings now ! The interurban bridge abutment is still there close to where this was taken from !

Posted June 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Smith Bridge Company was originally from Miami County (Tipp City) and were very experimental with their early iron trusses. A lot of those I suspect are yet to be found. I'm certainly not saying you're wrong and that it's not a CBW, I would just like to see more substantial proof than a twisted pile of metal.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

I forgot to mention; I think you may be a bit conservative regarding CBW in Miami County. I suspect they were prolific in the county but since they were early, most of their spans were replaced early and are presently undocumented. Bridgehunter has one confirmed CBW, a Pratt through truss, still standing. I've crossed it!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

I don't know where it stood, but the remains in image #2 are a CBW. I wish they weren't.

Melissa,

That's great news, not bad news! Thank you for chasing this down! We now know the span that is standing in images 1, 3 & 4 was built by Canton Bridge Company in 1898 to replace two prior spans that collapsed together with a failed pier.

If you want to continue and reveal the complete story, I suspect the prior spans date from 1867 - 1883 ish. I suspect the build year of the prior bridge will be in an article written within a week of the destruction of the two spans the 1898 Canton span replaced.

Great work!

Art S.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not bad news at all Melissa, in fact it's your normal excellent job of tracking stuff down!

Canton makes sense as well for the 1898 span. They also sometimes featured built-up portals and round finials. It would be nice to find a pic of a CBW span, if it indeed occupied that empty space.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I am the Bearer of Bad News

Posted June 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Anything is a possibility Art, but also an assumption without documentation as proof. I have little doubt that CBW built a structure or two in Miami County, hopefully we can eventually unlock the answers.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, I've also been looking for any information on builders/CBW for this bridge. No information yet.

Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Melissa,

I wouldn't take your opinion as rude or sarcastic however, I think I disagree with you and Tony. I think the span shown still standing in images 1, 3 & 4 is the 1898 span, possibly/probably built by Bellefontaine as Tony suggests. But it didn't wash away in the 1913 floods but was replaced in the subsequent reconstruction of the crossing.

Melissa & Tony,

My interpretation of the articles (still love that a newspaper was called the 'Helmet'!) is that two spans were washed out in 1898 when the pier between them washed away.

Rather than replace the pier and the two spans 'in kind' they eliminated the lost pier with one long span.

The span still standing in images 1, 3 & 4 is likely this 1898 span. This remaining span is resting on a pier, not an abutment. So, it looks like at least one span washed away in 1913.

This would suggest that either more than one span was installed in 1898 or, more likely, the spans not washed away in 1898 were washed away in 1913. If this is the case, the image #2 photo makes sense. Also, this allows all of the photos to add up. This would mean that the prior bridge was a 3+ span CBW with two spans lost in 1898 and one or more lost in 1913.

Regards,

Art S.


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