Forum

Page 1 of 580 Next >

Post a comment

Posted January 25, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

And the news report screwed up the fact that he didn't just "damage" the Bridgeton Covered Bridge... He obliterated it!

Posted January 25, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

He was deemed an habitual offender... Liked to play with matches too much.

Posted January 25, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

90 Years?! That's like a murder sentence. Too bad we can't apply this sentence for needless demolitions of historic bridges too!

Posted January 25, 2022, by Jeff Wieland (jjwieland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Jesse Payne was found competent to stand trial in 2018, and was sentenced to 90 years in prison.

https://www.insurancejournal.com/news/midwest/2018/05/17/489...

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 25, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

So far the only visuals I have found are on HA. The Bethel Concord span is pretty easy to spot, but at this point I have only found one span on Twin Bridges.

Posted January 25, 2022, by Christopher Finigan

Guys, I heard the news about the proposal to tear down the bridge. The local news channel who covered the story provided an email for the public to comment on regarding the project. I just wrote to ODOT advocating to preserve the bridge. I urge you all to email ODOT, asking them to preserve and restore the bridge instead of demolishing it!

ty.thompson@dot.ohio.gov

Posted January 25, 2022, by Ian Armitage (iarmitage75 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I lived just east of here for several years. I've seen the water up to the top of the arch over the road. Also, one winter a car got trapped in a drift on the north side of the bridge. The people ended up spending the night in hte car. Everyone was OK if I remember correctly.

Posted January 25, 2022, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I posted this over on the Sharp's Landing Ferry listing. They had it posted at the same location, but with a reference to Chocktaw County and McCurtain County both.

....(the map I linked below shows it called the Albion Ferry and Albion Community is on SH-37 on the Texas side).

I agree that the 20th Century (current) river channel runs significantly to the north of the statutory state line where the current bridge crosses and would absolutely have probably half a mile between the bank of the current channel and the state line . The current stringer bridge begins in Red River County TX (barely) and ends in McCurtain County OK.

The ferry at Albion did not cross on the same (straight) path as the modern bridge. The ferry was back to the east past the confluence of the Red and Big Pine Creek. (The Red technically forks and joins Big Pine upstream to the bridge, but the ferry appears to be downstream of the bridge where the river has a single channel.) According to the maps, the Ferry here would have run from Red River County TX to McCurtain County OK.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth19681/m1/1/zo...

As an aside, there are SEVERAL ferries detailed according to this map.

Posted January 25, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Well, that is beyond disappointing. I would think its status as a rare eyebar chain suspension span would have gained it more preservation interest. Not only that, but it is one impressive structure with its suspended side span as well as the main span and the tower that looms above the Muskingum floodplain like a giant. You just don't see suspension bridges in the heart of Ohio, let alone eyebar chain ones!

Posted January 25, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks Nathan!

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 25, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Rick,

That sounds like a pinned span most likely.

I tried hunting down some of the other lost East Fork trusses (like the Twin Bridges) but haven't found anything yet.

Posted January 25, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony,

I deleted the photos here and deleted the other page you referenced.

Posted January 25, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

Please remove photos 1-4.

I created a new page for the covered bridge and moved pics 1-3 to that page. I also moved pic #4 of the RR bridge to it's established page.

Thanks!

Posted January 25, 2022, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

Please delete this page as it is a duplicate of this one:

http://bridgehunter.com/in/fountain/sterling-drive/

Thanks!

Posted January 24, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

I was likewise surprised '13 didn't do it in. I would say it had a lot to do with the abutment damage that was described.

The situation with the tracks immediately made me think of Kellogg, with the plans for the IR&T that apparently never came to fruition.

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 24, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

My friend, just three young idiots out riding around in the dark, I only crossed it a couple of times. But one of the reasons for that was all the noise it made, it seemed quite rickety, if that helps with your question. I honestly do not even remember if it was a steel or wood floor.

You are right about East Fork Lake, Twin Bridges Road quickly comes to mind. And if you take Bethel Concord Road to where it dead-ends at the lake, sometimes if the lake is low enough you can see the old road ROW with the big opening where the bridge used to be.

re: New Member Account
Posted January 24, 2022, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Welcome Marc from Owen County! Great bridges in Putnam!!

Posted January 24, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Just got a "surprise" email this morning about a meeting where I have learned the ODOT district that owns this bridge is seeking demolition of this bridge, which is one of the most unique and significant bridges in Ohio. The demolition apparently doesn't need federal funding or Army Corps permits so Section 106 doesn't apply. They say the actual project is 3-4 years out. I am deeply disappointed that demolition would even be considered for a bridge of this rarity.

re: New Member Account
Posted January 24, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Marc,

Glad to hear BridgeHunter has been useful to you and that you promote the historic bridges during the event! I have activated your account and you may now log in! Welcome to the BridgeHunter community! We welcome your contributions. If you have any questions or need help, feel free to post a question to this forum.

New Member Account
Posted January 24, 2022, by Marc O'Leary (dustbowl100 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hello all! I am the event director of the Dust Bowl 100 gravel bicycle race in west-central Indiana. The race route crosses 9 historic bridges in Putnam County. As part of the social media marketing for the race, I have a "Feature Features" series where I highlight historical landmarks along the course, including the bridges. I utilize BridgeHunter regularly for that content (and to learn about other bridges I encounter on other rides). I figured I'd go ahead and request an account so that I can add additional photos, etc. to the Bridge pages. Thanks!

Posted January 24, 2022, by Melissa Jurgensen (Mjurgensen [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge is now closed to traffic and is to be replaced very soon.

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 24, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Rick,

Olive Branch-Stonelick DOES appear to be a parallel-chord truss, so it's certainly a possibility for NCL-34.

However, my feeling is that the spans on Olive Branch, which appear to be 100' or so in Historic Aerials, were too short for the 11+ panel Whipple depicted in the photo, which seems like it would be more the size of a single-span truss over the East Fork (no idea where though, especially since a number of bridges went out of existence when the lake at East Fork State Park was created).

In your remembrance (I know this was 30+ years ago), does it seem like the Olive Branch span was a lighter pinned truss or a heavier riveted one?

Posted January 24, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Rick,

It looks like floods were the main culprit...to be honest, I'm kind of surprised it survived 1913!

Interestingly, the HAER report says the interurban company folded in 1920, yet the 1924 span incorporated interurban tracks. Apparently no one realized that the interurban era was done....my guess is the tracks on the 1924 bridge were never used.

Posted January 24, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Photo #1 deleted.

Posted January 24, 2022, by Ryan Myers (ryanmyers8 [at] gmail [dot] com)

What a amazing photo. The CMSP&P line ran right off of my babysitters back yard when I was 3-6 years old. It is one of my most vivid memories of being that young, watching those freight trains gain speed as they worked up that slight grade toward this overpass as my sitter's house was just south of the 27th Street NE road crossing. I have searched so much to find more photography of this all but forgotten and once very utilized line that crept right through residences and behind business on its way to meet with the east west main line. If anyone can point me in the direction of any other documentation or imagery of this line going through NE and SE Cedar Rapids, please email me! This history must be preserved!

Posted January 23, 2022, by Howard Pincus (naugmow [at] gmail [dot] com)

Middle beam span was added during the rebuilding, after the Aug. 1955 flood.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Howard Pincus (naugmow [at] gmail [dot] com)

Postcard image appears to be "flopped"-- view looks north, but the wide areas of the piers are actually on the west side.

Posted January 23, 2022, by JIM STEWART (JAMESEMSTEWART57 [at] GMAIL [dot] COM)

https://www.conteches.com/Portals/0/Documents/Design%20Guide...

DOES ANYONE ELSE THINK THE CORRUGATED PLATES ARE ALUMINUM ?

SEE PAGES 64 AND FOLLOWING IN THE CONTECH BOOKLET LINK.

(I'M NOT SUGGESTING CONTECH WAS THE SUPPLIER, ONE WAY OR THE OTHER.)

Posted January 23, 2022, by Luke

The HAER report explains everything...

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

I think I see what you mean, the road remains straight for too long after the bridge. South Milford was my only guess for this scenario, so I have no idea where this might be.

Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I've never come across anything about the short lifespan for this structure. Could increased traffic volume have necessitated a change in 1924?

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 23, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Never mind...comparing the photo to Historic Aerials, I don't think they match, so this can't be South Milford. It must be some other bridge.

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

The NCL-24 pic could very well be South Milford, the layout is definitely similar with the roads. But without my own pics in front of me, it's hard to say for certain.

I wish I could see more of the NCL-34 pic, specifically to see if it had a 2nd span, it could almost be mistaken for Olive Branch-Stonelick.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Looks like an interurban used this bridge according to HAER.

Interesting portal shots! I can't say I've seen a bridge with triple portals like that before.

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 23, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Oops....for some reason the links didn't behave like I thought.

Try this one: https://vintageaerial.com/photos/ohio/clermont/search?type=t...

The bottom photo is the one I wonder if it's South Milford, though I admit it's probably a long shot. Maybe I'm reading into the image what I want to see, but it looks like there might be a road running parallel to the stream that might be Round Bottom Road, and a line of trees parallel to that that might be a rail line? Again, I'm not positive what I'm seeing here.

Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

My bad, Luke. Looks like Paul beat me to this question by a day. :)

Posted January 23, 2022, by Luke

From the history section of the entry: "Beam bridge built alongside in 1978, forming a one-way pairing with the truss; removed from service in 1985"

Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Some interesting before and after shots of both steel bridges.

Is it me, or does it look like some type of tracks crossing them?

Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

So here is an image from the Cincinnati Enquirer. Kind of neat with references to the South Milford and Newtown bridges. I've always been curious about the dates, I can't imagine it took them 6 years to build the new one, so do you suppose the steel truss carried west bound traffic for a while until it closed in '85?

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Perhaps I don't know how to use the site properly, I didn't see any bridges in the images?

Posted January 23, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Quite the image, isn't it? I doubt if dealing with an event like this helped the longevity of the bridge.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Nathan - can you delete Photo 1 which is actually of the Poquessing Creek Bridge, BH 87682.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Neil Krout (kickinpony [dot] 66 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I visited the bridge today 1/23/22; bridge is open to traffic.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Chris Klouzek (drgadget427 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I just visited this bridge. Unless the stone bridge isn’t on the road, it appears it was replaced with a concrete bridge. 01/23/2022

Posted January 23, 2022, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

The "Colorado Fire" near Big Sur, CA has burned down to the Bixby Creek Bridge. Dramatic photo of fire at the bridge in this newspaper article. So far, the bridge itself appears to be undamaged, though a stretch of the highway is closed.

https://www.mercurynews.com/2022/01/22/rare-terrifying-winte...

Posted January 23, 2022, by Robin D Collins (vavistas1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

My husband, Kevin Collins, grew up in Potomac Farms in the 1960's. His family even had a garden on the island for many years. I remember him saying that it was a sod farm for quite some time, and I believe it was owned by a Bill Brockett.

The original piers were from a bridge that was in existence in the early 1960's. He remembered that a truck, possibly overloaded and driving too quickly, attempted to cross the bridge, got too close on one side and caused the pier and bridge to topple. His memories were that a crane was necessary to get the truck out of the river.

Hope this answers some questions.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Wyatt Griffis

More information on the bridge replacement as well as a photograph.

https://www.iceusa.com/blog/double-the-impact/

Posted January 23, 2022, by Chris Klouzek (drgadget427 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I just visited this bridge. Unless the stone bridge isn’t on the road, it appears it was replaced with a concrete bridge. 01/23/2022

Clermont County Bridges
Posted January 23, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Hey Rick,

I'm posting these links to two Clermont County bridge photos on the off chance that you or somebody else might be able to identify their locations. This is a just a hunch, but do you think the first link could be the South Milford bridge by any chance?

https://vintageaerial.com/photos/ohio/clermont/1973/NCL/54/2...

https://vintageaerial.com/photos/ohio/clermont/1973/NCL/35/3...

Posted January 23, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Not sure where this one was at...it's not the Brandewie Bridge, and the from the eBay listing it doesn't even seem sure that this bridge was in Sidney.

Posted January 23, 2022, by Anonymous

This is in Westmoreland county

Keeseville Historic Bridges Petition
Posted January 23, 2022, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

https://www.change.org/p/clinton-county-save-keeseville-s-hi...

The preservation group is working to save the historic bridges of Keeseville, which won the 2021 Bridgehunter Awards in three categories- Bridge of the Year, Bridge Tour Guide and Endangered T.R.U.S.S. Can you take a few minutes and sign the petition? Help their cause so the bridges can be restored. Thank you for your time and support! Your Bridge Matters! <3

2021 Bridgehunter Awards- Official Results In
Posted January 23, 2022, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Albeit a bit late, the results of the 2021 Bridgehunter Awards are officially in. Here are the highlights and a link is enclosed to view the full results in the ten categories:

Keeseville's historic bridges brings home the triple crown. 🥇🥇🥇

Riverside Bridge in Missouri wins three silver medals 🥈🥈🥈

Rochester Bridge (Best Example of a Restored Historic Bridge) and Kate Castle (Lifetime Achievement) win gold 🥇🥇

Schleswig-Holstein rakes up medals: 1 🥇 for Mystery Bridge (House Bridge at Angelberger Strasse in Flensburg) a 🥈 for Best Bridge Photo (Hochdonnviadukt) and a pair of 🥉, plus two Author's Choice Awards to the Münksbrücke near Dagebüll.

School bus bridge wins Best Kept Secret- most visited story and oft commented for its unique artwork. 🚸🏫 🥇

Brooklyn Bridge documentaries win Best Bridge Media and Genres 🥇

Bridge Tour Guide International returns to Saxony- Grimma wins 🥇

Best Bridge Photo winner is from Czechia 🇨🇿

Details and final tally are all here:

https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2022/01/22/202...

Thank you for your help in voting and encouraging others to vote as well. Your votes mattered but most importantly, Your Bridge Matters. 🌉❤️😊

Posted January 22, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Looks like an 1890's Massillon.

Posted January 22, 2022, by Paul Plassman

https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=10219475954836901&set=g...

According to this post, the bridge at Lucasville was built in 1904 and demolished in 1972.

However, this contradicts another post that says a bridge at Lucasville (possibly the 1879 bridge) washed out in 1913, so I'm not sure I place too much stock in these dates.

Posted January 22, 2022, by RJB (conneticat [at] yahoo [dot] com)

https://portal.ct.gov/DOT/News-from-the-Connecticut-Departme...

CTDOT was awarded for being ahead of schedule, under budget, never impeding traffic during construction, and building an exceptionally beautiful and structurally sound bridge.

Posted January 22, 2022, by Anonymous

Or even better they could both be deleted

Posted January 22, 2022, by Paul Plassman

This bridge is the same as https://bridgehunter.com/ny/herkimer/bh85804/ and could probably be merged with it.

Concrete Arch Bridge -where?
Posted January 22, 2022, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Here's a 2nd photo of the arch bridge labelled Little Falls NY.

Concrete Arch Bridge -where?
Posted January 22, 2022, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

Anyone recognize this open spandrel arch bridge under construction? The McLaughlin Photos are labelled Little Falls NY on the back, but it can't be Little Falls. The two truss bridges to the right may help ID it.

Posted January 22, 2022, by Luke

The portals on the photo Geoff added (which is a better quality version of one Art added) are different than Long Bridge's. It should be its own entry, and I vote Geoff uploads his photo to that entry.

Posted January 22, 2022, by Luis (luissanlop36 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is featured in the movie "Green Book" (Peter Farrelly, 2018):

Posted January 22, 2022, by Luis (luissanlop36 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is featured in the movie "Shadow of a Doubt" (Alfred Hitchcock, 1943):

Posted January 22, 2022, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I m not sure where Sharpe's Landing ferry was, but it if were at or even close to the current SH-37 crossing, it doesn't get anywhere close to Choctaw county OK. (the map I linked below shows it called the Albion Ferry and Albion Community is on SH-37 on the Texas side).

I agree that the 20th Century (current) river channel runs significantly to the north of the statutory state line where the current bridge crosses and would absolutely have probably half a mile between the bank of the current channel and the state line . The current stringer bridge begins in Red River County TX (barely) and ends in McCurtain County OK.

The ferry at Albion did not cross on the same (straight) path. It ran back to the east past the confluence of the Red and Big Pine Creek. (The Red technically forks and joins Big Pine upstream to the bridge, but the ferry appears to be downstream of the bridge where the river has a single channel.) According to the maps, the Ferry here would have run from Red River County TX to McCurtain County OK.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth19681/m1/1/zo...

This all said, the Davenport Ferry which was upstream several miles did sit about at the line between McCurtain and Choctaw Counties OK. (With Red River County TX on the south bank. )

As an aside, there are SEVERAL ferries detailed according to this map.

Posted January 22, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Wow! The photos you posted are impressive, Rick....especially the flood one!

Posted January 21, 2022, by Paul Plassman

I keep thinking that the old bridge, either with one span or two, could have made a nice attraction for a park, being right on the edge of Williamsburg like it was....

Posted January 21, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

I've never put very much stock in this notion as it was just rumor, I do not even remember the source. Plus, I've always thought St. Philomena looked a bit smallish for the 50 site, although it isn't a huge crossing.

Basically, it was your theory that made the rumor seem plausible---and who knows? Not out of the realm that a replacement bridge in the 1880's didn't make it very far.

Posted January 21, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

I'm not sure when they took out the remaining span, but it was still there in '95. Sometime after that we returned and it was gone. But when we were there in '95 for pics, I remember we were relieved that " at least they left the main span ".

I don't know, too many years and too many bridges perhaps, but myself and my wife both remembered this the same.

Regardless, what a waste. I'll presume another situation with liability issues.

GREAT find with the pic!

Posted January 21, 2022, by Anonymous

bridge to be replaced in 2022

Posted January 21, 2022, by Anonymous

bridge to be replaced in 2022

Posted January 21, 2022, by Anonymous

1955 bridge was replaced by MODOT.

Posted January 21, 2022, by Anonymous

scheduled to be replaced in 2023

Posted January 21, 2022, by tim Boley (timandgail67 [at] gmail [dot] com)

the old rail road used to be a hikers dream could be accessed by different roads when the little curve tunnel fell in it put the end to a lot of it but you can still drive down carnifex rd off sunday rd that is still a county rd some people tried to ciose it many times but it is still open as of 1 8 22 it is ruffer than a corn cob bot i drove my old tahoe down it to the mouth of the gauley my grandfather carried the mail from nichoias co cross the carnifax ferry i would like to see a trail cut around the little curve tunnel and the flood damage cleaned up i would volunteer time but you could easier add a verse to the bible than deal with park service they do not play well with others so it is what it is

Posted January 21, 2022, by Paul Plassman

And that pier is impressive!

It looks like they did leave the south span for some time after the new bridge was built, so maybe that's an indicator that the north span was lost at some point after 1984 and replaced with a temporary approach (though it's possible they just removed the north span when they built the new bridge because it was the only one in the way of the new alignment).

Posted January 21, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Rick,

As to whether the St. Philomena truss came from US 50....it's possible, albeit I'm not seeing any documented connection as it dates from 1904, while the old covered bridge on 50 washed out in 1888, meaning an iron bridge would likely date from 1888-89. Of course, it's entirely possible that a bridge was rebuilt in 1888 and then replaced again in 1904 by the bridge that was later moved to St. Philomena.

I'm planning to do more Clement County research this evening when I have more time; maybe I'll come up with something. Also I want to dig into some more of the covered bridges on the county historical society page!

Posted January 21, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Bingo!

That curved portal bracing looks familiar....I can't remember what bridge I've seen that on. Might be a clue to the builder.

Posted January 21, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan,

This is another I found one night driving around with my friends, it was quite the sight to come upon suddenly in the dark. I have pics of this stored away, but they are primitive and I'm pretty sure they are of the bypass when only one span is remaining.

It's strange, I only remember one truss and what seemed like an approach span, but as recently as '84 on HA there looks like 2 trusses. I wonder if they could have possibly removed one of the trusses, but if so, would they not have just replaced the bridge right then and there?

Posted January 20, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Unfortunately, unless the SFN is wrong, I am not getting anything, not even an old sheet, in the HBI. Maybe because it was lost so long ago. Would be interested to see what it looked like, any pre 1880 bridge is usually interesting.

Posted January 20, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Great addition, this is another one I forgot about.

As best I recall, this had the main span and an approach on the north side, perhaps a stringer of some type? Would that jive with the build date? As I recall, the approach was rather long, too long for a pony at the time.

When it was replaced, they demolished the approach but left the main span for several years. This is another I have pics of, but I'm pretty sure only the bypassed version.

Posted January 20, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Looks like I'm keeping you busy!

Regarding your guess on the U.S. 50 bridge, somewhere over the years I heard the steel truss at St Philomena came from downstream at 50. This would fit your theory. I suppose the only question would be if the lengths were similar?

The Olive Branch truss really broke my heart, it was a magnificent structure (even in the dark) and I could not believe it was gone when I returned with a camera.

Check out the Clermont Historical Society webpage, they have multiple covered bridges for the county. Of particular note are the Red Bridge and Jackson Pike Bridge, two locations that I know still have the old abutments.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Nathan,

My guess is that there will be considerably less interest in bridges in the future, both from engineering students and historians, especially as even more of the old spans are lost. In my own case, I don't even remember when I got interested in bridges, it's pretty much just always been a part of me. I'd say my interest in truss bridges was really kindled about ten years ago, however, after I discovered your website and visited the Tindall Bridge in Sandusky County, Ohio; however, it wasn't really until four or five years ago that I began exploring and photographing these old icons on my own.

I never really thought of roller coasters as being bridge-like structures (perhaps because I've never really been up close to one), but now that you mention it they do have somewhat similar structures that in this case are deliberately designed to be spectacular. Also I'm a big fan of the mega-interchanges in Texas as well...the Dallas High Five is an incredible feat of engineering!

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Rick,

I added in the bridges you mentioned as well as a few others I started uncovering information about. Unfortunately the two steel bridges you remembered were replaced in 1990 and 1991, so I couldn't access any NBI records to get their dimensions or build dates. Then I got interested and began adding in some other lost bridges over the East Fork that showed up in the old NBI. Interestingly, the covered bridge on 50 was lost all the way back in 1888....I'm guessing it was replaced by a one-lane bridge which was probably replaced by the truss you remember.

Regarding the old Round Bottom bridge, I haven't been able to unearth anything regarding construction in the 80's....my guess is that this bridge was not that well built considering it only lasted 45 years and so it may have been a rehab of sorts. It seems to have been part of a disturbing trend of modern bridges not even lasting half a century....two of the newest bridges in my county replaced spans that were only in their 30's.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Paul,

I often wonder what future generations will think of "new" bridges like these. Will an 85 year old pre-stressed adjacent concrete beams with Armco guardrail stir the passions of a young high school student who discovers it in the way the first pin connected through truss I photographed captivated me with its complexity and variety of details? Are bridges "interesting" simply because they are old, or because they are "engineered structures" and the complexity plays no role? Or have we crossed a line where bridges are now so simple in appearance that they won't be seen by "regular people" as anything other than a continuation of a road. You are correct that Modjeski would not have liked many of the trusses that get a lot of attention on this website (portal cresting, and finials were particularly disliked as they were non-structural attempts at aesthetics, although I see this as similar to today's context sensitive design... putting stone formliners on concrete to make it look old for example) Similarly I wonder if someone like Modjeski would like this bridge for example (I do find his ideas on aesthetics to be quite interesting and substantiated by actual bridges he built, and more sensible compared to more boisterous opinions held by Waddell, who mostly just ran his mouth while continuing to build movable bridges that did not really fit into this thinking). Lastly, although everyone here knows modern bridges are not my thing, I would also add my opinions are colored by my overseas travel where I have found that many modern bridges of creative and aesthetic design can be seen... everywhere from Europe to Asia I have seen much nicer looking bridges than are built in America. Actually some of the most interesting forms of modern engineering in America that come close to bridge design but with some aesthetic qualities would be roller coasters, the way in which structural steel is used to form these bridge-like structures is, I think, employed in an aesthetic manner, since so much time is spent with people waiting in line under these structures, the businesses that rely on these for income want them to look nice while people wait. To be fair I do hold a (very secret) interest in extremely large interchanges even if they are modern, mainly I am thinking of Texas which has some insane interchange bridges that certainly are more worthy of being on a website like bridgehunter (rather than the modern MOBs people have posted in the past) I used to draw interchanges like this when I was bored as a kid in school. https://goo.gl/maps/A8azJGPxKcTCS3Q46

Posted January 20, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hey Paul,

Speaking of sending you looking down a trail...

If you check out the images I spoke of on HA, just follow Binning Road until it intersects Olive Branch-Stonelick Road. At this point there was a rickety steel truss that crossed East Fork, and a little further up there was a truss that carried U.S. 50 over Stonelick Creek.

Both bridges were lost about the same time, late 80's/early 90's. The Olive Branch truss was a two-spanner and made more noise than the Harshaville Covered Bridge. We came across it in the dark, it was quite the experience. The bridge on 50 was your typical (Parker?) U.S. highway truss, but apparently many moons ago there was a covered span at this same crossing.

By the time I grew enough sense to go back with a camera in the early 90's, they were gone.

For me, the 1970 image on HA worked best.

Posted January 20, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

Yes, the bridge just recently re-opened. We were musing about the fact it was not that old, now I understand what they were doing.

But now I am curious what was going on in the mid-80's? I came across this one night riding around with college friends, one of them simply said they were replacing the old steel bridge that had been there. But after checking out HA, the truss bridge is evident in the 1970 image, but the '84 and '85 images look like the UCEB.

Because of whom I was with and what we were doing, my memory is circa '85 or '86. I never saw the site in the daylight, but it seemed the road was closed at the junction of 50 for some time. I wonder what was up? It would seem the UCEB has required a lot of maintenance in a short period of time.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Nathan,

Working in restoration would certainly be something I would enjoy doing. I don't necessarily think all modern bridges are ugly (and even a cookie-cutter prestressed stringer like this one holds some attraction for me, as weird as that sounds) but they definitely don't compare in any respect to the old spans.

Then again, I keep thinking that perhaps during the iron bridge heyday, the engineers who designed them might have considered their bridges ugly compared to the stone structures and other bridges that had gone before (I think it was Ralph Modjeski who considered bridges of his time to actually be fairly utilitarian and expected future spans to show more aesthetic quality haha!), so maybe someday today's modern concrete bridges might look good compared to what might get built in the future....I doubt this will happen and hope it doesn't but who knows.

Either way, the inventory photos definitely look more appropriate as a thumbnail for this page.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Hey Rick,

I followed your lead about this bridge and though I couldn't locate a photo, I was able to find a build date, rather to my surprise. It seems Clermont County replaced the bridge that took the place of the truss just this year and there was a little info on that site. I didn't find anything about it being replaced in the 1980's, however; the replacement site indicated that the old truss was replaced by concrete beams on the original abutments in 1976, which is what the NBI seems to hint at as well.

Either way, nice lead and thanks for sending me looking down this trail!

Posted January 20, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Paul,

From one pontist to another here's to hoping you can find a job working in the rehab/restoration divisions of VS Engineering (Jim Barker) or maybe McCormick Taylor or even Transystems so you don't have to spend your life designing bridges like this (my research indicated that this is not just the 2nd longest, its also Ohio's 2nd ugliest!) This country needs more engineers with an appreciation and understanding of historic bridges and who have confidence in the methods of repair and restoration that are feasible for so many historic bridges.

Also, as to this page specifically, I think the page was originally intended to list the historic truss bridge at this location based on the data shown, so I added the old HBI sheet as thats all I have for this bridge, sadly.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Some good photos of this nationally significant rare surviving remnant of a monumental George Morison bridge are on Google Maps. https://goo.gl/maps/jxiDXh2f5XDd74Yc7

While Google Maps has significant numbers of photos of bridges and other things that are not readily available elsewhere, it is an absolutely horrible platform because they provide no way whatsoever to contact the photographer (such as to arrange permission to use a photo). Also, while the Google Maps servers store the Original / Full Size photo, the website code displays only a fraction of the potential resolution (mouse wheel zoom in does NOT load the full resolution). Only way to gain access to the original is to "Report a Problem" then save the image or open the image in a new tab. This gets you the photo with full detail, but no way to gain permission to use. Although on the other side of the coin if the photographer cares so little about their intellectual property to allow it to be displayed in such a manner maybe they don't care about if someone steals the photo either.

Anyway, browsing thru these photos I did find a decent photo of the little Pratt through truss. Not as significant, but still unusual with lattice instead of cover plate on the top chord (but plate for the end posts). The Pratt truss looks to be about 105 feet.

Lastly two of the photos I believe belonged on the other page for the two span bridge that was demolished so I moved those here https://bridgehunter.com/wy/fremont/bh79982/

IA Online Sessions
Posted January 20, 2022, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

For the past year or so, the SIA (Society for Industrial Archeology) has been hosting online sessions via Zoom on various IA topics, including bridges. They have been made available on a YouTube channel, and I have provided a link below. Some may find them of interest.

https://www.youtube.com/c/SocIndustArch/videos

Posted January 20, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul,

I wish I could help more with this, but I'm just settling into middle age, so despite rumors to the contrary I wasn't around when this happened. :)

Without any other sources, either date could be correct.

I don't know if this is something you would want to pursue, but there was a similar steel truss to this one several miles away that carried Round Bottom Road over the same East Fork. It was taken down in the mid 80's. Unfortunately, I have no personal history with it so that's all I can give you.

Posted January 20, 2022, by John Witzl (jwj56 [at] aol [dot] com)

I used to jump off this bridge back in the 60S

Posted January 20, 2022, by Hildredge Tripp (tripphd [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge is still in operation. Found it yesterday to be pretty much in the same shape as in the pictures. There was a northbound coal unit train, probably bound for the Entergy plant at Newark, waiting for permission to advance across the bridge. Almost certainly the swing span is inoperable, I don't think there is much commercial traffic on the White River.

Also, I noticed in the description that this crosses a roadway, and that is correct in the smallest of senses. It does cross a dirt county farm road, but it's main purpose is to cross the White River south of Newport.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

The below comment about the replacement bridge being Ohio's second-longest single-span prestressed concrete bridge appears to be correct per a quick search on BridgeReports.com, although there are a few multi-span bridges in the Buckeye State with longer spans. Incidentally, the longest single-span bridge of this type in Ohio is also in Scioto County, on Dixon Mill Road.

Not historic or noteworthy enough for a listing on this site but of interest to a prospective civil engineer (me).

Posted January 20, 2022, by Gary F King (gfking11563 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is greatly in need of a makeover. I would suggest, lighting, ample pedestrian and or bike lanes and a guard rail sufficient for safety on this important link between Merritt Island, Cocoa Beach and Cocoa Village.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

Per this article, this bridge is to be replaced next year.

https://www.starbeacon.com/news/local_news/conneaut-approves...

Posted January 20, 2022, by Paul Plassman

I added both dates in for future reference. Even if it did go down in 1913, a three-year replacement timeline would have been entirely plausible given the magnitude of destruction from the flood. With counties having to replace dozens of bridges all at once, the process of rebuilding them all probably took years.

Also to point out that while it would probably take a tornado to wreck an iron truss due to its open nature, a covered bridge would have been lots more susceptible to simple straight-line wind damage. Thus, the "cyclone" may or may not have been an actual tornado, which may explain why it was never reported as such. Then again, as Nathan mentioned, weather forecasting and analysis wasn't anything like it is today in 1913 and/or 1915.

Posted January 20, 2022, by Brian Gregory (briandavidgregory [at] gmail [dot] com)
Interview with the winner of the 2020 Bridgehunter Awards- Lifetime Achievement
Posted January 19, 2022, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

Some of you may have heard of structurae.net before but don't know some facts about it. The website, founded by Nicolas Janberg in 1998, is one of the oldest active websites devoted to architecture and infrastructure. It is the world's largest database for anything design and built by civil and architectural engineers. It's an excellent resource for anything with bridges, skyscrapers and everything else we use on a daily basis. I had a chance to interview Nicolas Janberg who was last year's winner of the Bridgehunter Awards in the category Lifetime Achievement. Check out the interview and have a look at the website. Both may inspire you to do something creative and special in your field of interest. :-)

Link: https://bridgehunterschronicles.wordpress.com/2022/01/20/int...

Posted January 19, 2022, by RICK SHELTON (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Paul, Nathan,

The Clermont County Historical Society still shows 1915 as the date of the " cyclone ". Obviously one of the dates is in error. With the build date of 1916 for the steel truss, I guess it would depend on how long they waited to replace the bridge.


Page 1 of 580 Next >