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Hall's Mill Bridge

Photos 

Hall's Mill in the background manufactured cotton thread at the time of this photo.

Photo collection of Chester Gehman

Enlarge

BH Photo #485405

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost Bridge over Natchaug River on Mansfield Road
Location
North Windham, Windham County, Connecticut
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.75275, -72.15477   (decimal degrees)
41°45'10" N, 72°09'17" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/736556/4626237 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 91177 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • November 10, 2020: Added by Chester Gehman

Sources 

  • Chester Gehman - gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com

Comments 

Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Has to make you wonder if much of that bracing was added later in an attempt to stiffen the trusses.

Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

But then again... you never know! lol

Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I'm going in a different direction as I'm not seeing an ellipse here, but essentially a large diamond (with all kinds of crazy bracings) within a vertical endpost through truss. I think the ends may well be entirely cast... perhaps the whole bridge. I've not seen anything like it and would not be surprised if it's at least 1860's.

Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester,

My first guess is that it is a very early (first?) form of a lenticular through truss by Corrugated Metal Co. (predecessors to the Berlin Iron Bridge Co.). Putting its build date at of before 1877.

I have some other guesses but I'm quite certain my first is correct.

Regards,

Art S.

Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very bizarre and unusual! I wouldn't be surprised if this one didn't date into the 1850's. It puts me in mind of a precursor to a K-Truss.

Hall's Mill Bridge
Posted November 10, 2020, by Chester Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Rather unusual truss configuration. Any guess on truss type and builder?