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Posted April 23, 2017, by John Marvig

It appears that this bridge is not original to the 1950s. I see some interesting riveted connections, which seem to indicate the bridge was rebuild from an earlier 1900s pinned through truss span. In addition, this design matches several CBQ spans from the late 1890s and early 1900s

Posted February 3, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice winter shots John, thanks for braving the elements!

Posted October 29, 2016, by Warren Caudle (wcaudle [at] nctv [dot] com)

Anyone have any history on this? There is a tunnel shown. Was this part of the RR?

Posted August 17, 2016, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bing birds eye view shows no bridge but you can see where the bridge sat.

Posted June 26, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yeah... I just didn't look hard enough!

Posted June 25, 2016, by Barry (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

Sure looks like a bridge to me, right under the red pin. The deck looks overgrown with grass.

Posted June 25, 2016, by Anonymous

Well, a couple of us humans looked, and a couple of us still couldn't see it.

Posted June 25, 2016, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

If a human was to look at google earth or maps that human will see that the truss has been kept and is sitting on the ground just south of the new bridge. Hopefully, someone will get curious and go confirm this, but for now, my word has to stand.

Posted June 23, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A new bridge is shown in satellite imagery, was it relocated somewhere else?

Posted June 23, 2016, by Wyomingite (wyomingresident [at] wyoming [dot] com)

This is the oldest remaining truss bridge in the state of Wyoming. It was not replaced in 2008.

Posted June 3, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Yes, please

Posted June 3, 2016, by Tim wakefield (twake55 [at] gmail [dot] com )

I can take pictures of local bridges near Green River Wyoming and upload them if you are interested. How about railroad bridges? By the way, You have a great site.

Posted June 2, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like it could be a king post pony truss or a roof truss bridge. Either way listed it just because it does look to have trusses.

Posted June 2, 2016, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge looks to have been removed and set in a field. Not sure if it exists still or not.

Posted June 20, 2015, by Carol (Sherwood/Smith) Hosler (carol_hosler [at] msn [dot] com)

My great grandmother was moving from Cleveland where she and her late husband had lived for many years. He was a civil engineer and frequently was gone from home on projects, including a railroad dock at Marquette on Lake Superior. He invented a mechanism for unloading ships. Of her journey west on a train she wrote the following about the Fort Laramie Bridge.

I deplored the conditions that nearly half my journey was enveloped in the darkness of the night; one desire was to view the old trail, where so many people had traveled thirty-five years previous to go forward to the Black Hills in search of gold, the panic of inspiration being almost equal to the old times of forty-nine when the great rush was to California for gold. Mr. S.- (Orsamus Sherwood) was at the time erecting a large bridge for the government at Fort Laramie where nearly all were obliged to cross that river, it being the Platte, and about the time the bridge was completed Colonel Crook's Army was ordered north to re-enforce Colonel Custer's, among the northern hills, but the army proper was not permitted to cross the bridge (as it was not yet accepted by the Government) but the Colonel was allowed to cross in his ambulance, he being an high officer. But their expedition was of no avail for Colonel Custer's army had been 14 massacred, almost to a man, and the news came back to Fort Laramie, very soon, that such was the case, one man escaped to bear the news of the terrible slaughter.

Posted June 16, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its amazing what people will believe. Someone fooled a state with very few truss bridges to lose, that this historic truss was "too dilapidated to repair." http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/dilapidated-historic...

Posted February 18, 2015, by Robert Edsall (carto [dot] robedsall [at] gmail [dot] com)

we visited this bridge last summer. it is closed to traffic. we walked out onto the deck and found huge holes across the span... I saw no sign of rehabilitation or construction. It's a beautiful spot, with lots of birds - a nice oasis in an otherwise sparse area.

Posted February 2, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Carol: I'd definitely be interested in any information or stories about the bridge you might have.

Posted February 2, 2015, by Carol Hosler (carol_hosler [at] msn [dot] com)

My Great-Grandfather was the engineer on this project. Is there anyone out there that wants more information on that?

Posted October 23, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Very interesting bridge. I don't know much about Wyoming aside from its striking lack of historic truss bridges. I would hope that this early rivet-connected truss bridge with the unusual multi-function three truss line design would be considered eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and a preservation plan is in place for the bridge.

Posted September 6, 2014, by Luke

According to Google Maps and a few other sources, the local (Perhaps official?) name is "Government Bridge"

Sources:

http://www.northplatteflyfishing.com/grey_govermentbridge.ph...

http://wyomingnaturalist.com/river_platte_casper.html

Posted June 10, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Maybe it was just abandoned by the county and is privately owned. It isn't shown in the National Bridge Inventory.

Posted June 10, 2014, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Um..........im going to go out on a limb here and say that this bridge still exists. The bridge is still shown on Google Earth and there are many references to it being there on the internet. I have changed the status of the bridge to "open to traffic" unless someone can confirm the opposite. Perhaps this is like events in the show "Lost" but less dramatic except to bridgehunters like us. Maybe in 1993 the bridge fell into another dimension, yet to us it is still there.........sends shivers up my spine.

Posted March 22, 2014, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted January 5, 2014, by Jack Schmidt (jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net)

Picture taken 6-24-13

My GPS N44 50.517 W108 25.708

Near Lovell, WY

Webmaster's note: The photo that was here has been incorporated into the main site.

Posted January 5, 2014, by Jack Schmidt (jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net)

BNSF Railway across I-25

Picture taken 6-19-13

My GPS N42 51.403 W106 17.650

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted January 5, 2014, by Jack Schmidt (jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net)

Picture taken 6-16-13

My GPS N41 43.480 W106 19.118

(Long drive down a rancher's road)

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted January 5, 2014, by Jack Schmidt (jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net)

Picture taken 6-15-13 in Saratoga, WY

My GPS N41 26.936 W106 47.825

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.

Posted September 17, 2013, by Kelly McClanahan

Although I do not have any pictures of own of the Hermosa Tunnels, here are a few from online.

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/pictures%5C83439%5CDSCF3272...

http://erikclindgren.rrpicturearchives.net/pictures%5C70466%...

Posted September 17, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This link shows the bridge photo Dave found in full size

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/68647689.jpg

I think I see floor beams under there, suggesting the truss still functions. However, the unusual appearance may be because the deck stringers rest on top of the floor beams. Sometimes deck stringers were originally riveted to the web of floor beams, which would lower the roadway, and make the truss look normal. Not sure if this bridge was originally like that, its all speculation with only one photo to go on.

Posted September 16, 2013, by Don Morrison

Actually, it kind of looks like they slapped those trusses on the side of a stringer bridge. And the deck surface sits kind of high in the trusses. It looks rather strange.

I've got a guess what they did in 1989/1990, but no clue why.

Both bridges just look wrong in streetview.

Posted September 16, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Dave King added another Barnum Road Bridge, with an NBI 1990 construction date, but which is clearly a riveted truss bridge.

This bridge is another Barnum Road Bridge, with an NBI date of 1989. Could this be another relocated riveted truss?

Posted September 16, 2013, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

NBI gives a 1990 date for this bridge. Obviously, this is a historic bridge, so perhaps the bridge was moved here in 1990?

Posted September 13, 2013, by J.P. (wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not sure if this is the original railing for this bridge, but it looks like some awesome lattice railing to me.

Posted August 29, 2013, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yeah, that would be a tall tunnel. It was a concatenation of 16'11" and 16'9", the vertical clearance of the two bores.

It's corrected now - and I found a webcam of the east portal. I added a link in "Sources".

Posted August 29, 2013, by Joel Bader (joenonac [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You should check the vertical clearance. It seems that a decimal point might have been moved. When I ran the figure through a calculator, I got a clearance of more than 305 miles!

Posted March 4, 2013, by Mat (majohnso [at] cwc [dot] edu)

Bridge to be removed in Spring of 2013.

http://county10.com/2013/03/04/county-transportation-set-to-...

Posted August 11, 2012, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Beautiful Pony Truss Bridge on Old US 85. Still open to traffic, but no NBI data. Any info would be appreciated.

Posted December 7, 2011, by J.P.

Current google imagery shows this bridge might be about to be reused.

Posted September 19, 2011, by Matt Lohry

Funny thing is, these Redneck bridges are still far more interesting than any modern UCEB! HA!!

Posted September 18, 2011, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I call these Redneck Bridges. Find some random junk, make a bridge: Git-R-Done!

Posted September 18, 2011, by Ben Tate (benji5221 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

According to Wikipedia, it was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. Of course that doesn't mean it still exists, but there should be a record of it somewhere. It also calls it the ELS Bridge.

#9 on the list

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Register_of_Historic_P...

Posted September 18, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very unusual bridge.

Hard to tell for certain if the arches are tubular or if they are composed of channels (sideways) with cover plate on top. The lack of any trussing except for a single vertical with an outrigger might indeed suggest a homemade deal of some kind.

If it is on an airport access road then I doubt it still exists, unless it was relocated elsewhere.

Posted September 18, 2011, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Ok.....just found this bridge searching through the HAER/HABS files. There is no NBI info and this bridge is not previously listed, so its totally an original find. If this bridge still exists that will be awesome, however, I cannot confirm anything using Google Earth because the image is fuzzy and street view cannot make it out. I need help. Also any more info regarding its design, construction, and date would be helpful.

Posted March 12, 2011, by J.P.

I believe this bridge still exists via google earth

Posted March 12, 2011, by J.P.

also noticed that there is no new listing for this county road on the NBI for a new bridge in 2000 or this years. Could it possibly be closed to all traffic and preserved in place?

Posted March 12, 2011, by J.P.

I think this bridge might still exist, via the bypassed bridge just to the south west of the new bridge.

Posted March 12, 2011, by J.P.
Posted December 15, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

Wow, a great find and great post.

Posted December 15, 2010, by J.P.

This is what i call a win win, Old iron bridge bypassed by a two span steel pony. While the old span is preserved in place. Wyoming for the Win.

Posted June 9, 2010, by Robert (robbsdogs [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced with a flat crossing. It was deemed unsafe after a girder was bent by a truck excessively speeding. Lives were lost.

Posted April 21, 2010, by MikeInPdx (mikeinpdx13 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I don't know much about the history but I was born and lived in Sheridan County as a child. I remember crossing that bridge in Dayton on our way up to camping in the Bighorns.

I'm glad they saved it as a pedestrian bridge.

Posted April 3, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I looked at a couple of different satellite images, which all show the bridge as being extant. And I'm sure these have all been taken since the 1993 date given for it's removal.

Posted April 2, 2010, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

Jason, There is a Google Earth image dated Jul 7, 2007, for this location that indicates a single lane through truss bridge at this location. Impossible to tell if it the same bridge but the dimensions certainly match.

Posted February 14, 2009, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

David, where exactly is this bridge located? It appears to be where US 30 runs parallel to the UPRR, with the C&S going over both. I seem to remember something like this scene on the southwest side of Cheyenne, near the I-80/I-25 interchange.

Posted July 15, 2007, by Diane Papineau (diane [dot] papineau [at] myportal [dot] montana [dot] edu)

Hi,

I'm finishing a graduate degree focused on the history of the Canyon area in Yellowstone. The bridge you have shown is called "Canyon Bridge." It spans Jay Creek as it joins the Yellowstone River. It is not part of the Artist Point road.

Chittenden Memorial Bridge spans the Yellowstone River at the start of the Artist Point Road.

Many history books on Yellowstone will corroborate this information (books by Haines, Whittlesey, etc.) as will my thesis which should be finished this fall. It will be downloadable from the Montana State University website.

Diane