Recent West Virginia Comments

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Posted April 23, 2017, by Troy (troyestroud [at] gmail [dot] com)

Actually, this bridge had once not been near Doane, but rather had been on the old county road at Missouri Branch between the old US 52 (now 152) and the old county road that was abandoned once the N&W Railroad pulled up the tracks in 1933. Once the tracks were removed, the right of way was turned over to the state Department of Highways and was a much better road than the old county road which winded along the hillside. Since this bridge was no longer needed, it was moved to its present location. You can see the old concrete supports in the creek at Missouri Branch behind the old stone house.

Posted April 20, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Larry:

Thanks for the comment. Personal stories like this really illustrate the importance of our historic bridges.

Bridgehunter does not maintain any archives. The bridge company may, or may not have kept an archival collection. If they did have an archival collection, it is hard to say where it would be now.

I would suggest checking with the West Virginia Division of Culture and History as I believe that they maintain the archives for the State of West Virginia:

http://www.wvculture.org/index.aspx

The Ohio County Library may be another good source.

http://www.ohiocountylibrary.org/wheeling-history

Good luck with your search. If you find some further information, please feel free to contribute on here.

Posted April 20, 2017, by larry Anderson (lbanderson [at] windstream [dot] net)

My third G-Grandfather came from Ireland and worked on the bridge from 1849 till his death as toll keeper in 1872.Would like to find information on the bridge CO.about employees etc etc.any information would be greatly appreciated.

Posted February 27, 2017, by Connie Mosteller (mikconmost [at] aol [dot] com)

From what I have heard and read (but can't relocate the media), the Kanawha County & the Lincoln County Boards of Education shared the cost of building these bridges so that students could get to school.

Posted February 19, 2017, by Luke

...

Posted February 19, 2017, by Jack Wright (jackwright1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Correction - you list Blue Tom bridge/tunnel in the CSX Coal River subduction as being in Kanawha County. It is not in Kanawha County - it is in Lincoln County by better than 5 miles. When you turn up Coal River off of WV 214 you go about 3 miles or so and the blacktop ends and you're in a rock base gravel road. The county line is where the blacktop ends. At this point you're in Lincoln County. I'm positive of this - my grandparents live in the first house in Lincoln County after you crossed the county line back in the 1960s-70s.

Posted February 16, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

Closed for emergency repairs (as of January 27, 2017): http://www.transportation.wv.gov/highways/districts/district...

Thurmond Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted January 17, 2017, by Sherman Cahal (shermancahal [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is currently undergoing rehabilitation with pedestrian bump-outs being added: http://www.transportation.wv.gov/highways/engineering/commen...

Posted January 2, 2017, by Greg Hall (cyclebay [at] aol [dot] com)

Stopped by just before Christmas 2016 to visit these bridges. They now have metal placed across the entrances to indicate they can no longer be used. Visited with a local that was walking his dogs and he says that the wood is getting so bad that "they" decided that the bridges were no longer safe to use. As they are both semi abandoned, not sure who's responsibility it is to maintain them. Suspect they were built by a private company in the beginning.

This fellow also said that there was never a coal settlement where the bridges are, rather, a Sand Company (road to the North end of the Little Coal River bridge is named "Sand Plant Road") that there had been a company there that used barges to dredge the river to get sand from it. He further claimed that legend holds there is still a barge in the river that was left and had sunk. He alleged that the Sand Plant operation had preceded the rail road tracks that exist today on the north end.

Posted January 2, 2017, by Greg Hall (cyclebay [at] aol [dot] com)

Stopped by just before Christmas 2016 to visit and these bridges. They now have metal placed across the entrances to indicate they can no longer be used. Visited with a local that was walking his dogs and he says that the wood is getting so bad that "they" decided that the bridges were no longer safe to use. As they are both semi abandoned, not sure who's responsibility it is to maintain them. Suspect they were built by a private company in the beginning.

This fellow also said that there was never a coal settlement where the bridges are, rather, a Sand Company (road to the North end of the Little Coal River bridge is named "Sand Plant Road") that there had been a company there that used barges to dredge the river to get sand from it. He further claimed that legend holds there is still a barge in the river that was left and had sunk. He alleged that the Sand Plant operation had preceeded the rail road tracks that exist today on the north end.

Posted October 12, 2016, by Clover N. Star (greydelislefan [at] gmail [dot] com)

Passed under this bridge many times in my youth on the Ohio side. Awesome to see that it's as old as it is and is still in great shape.

Posted September 16, 2016, by Seth Gaines (sethgaines [at] gmail [dot] com)

This has been gone since 2012-13. Drove over it in May '12, and the replacement bridge was well under way.

Posted August 28, 2016, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Not sure of the prospects for this bridge. New bridge being built beside it now (2016)

Posted August 28, 2016, by Steve Conro (sconro [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Description is absolutely correct. There's short sections of earth embankment between the main B&O Potomac River as well as the Potomac St overpass. All 3 are separate structures when you're standing there.

Shiloh Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 12, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Kile Bridge in this same county was bypassed on a new alignment and left standing. I see no reason why the same thing couldn't take place here!

http://bridgehunter.com/wv/tyler/middle-island-creek/

Posted July 25, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Its nice they are trying to raise awareness of both the history and the often ignored weight limit. My first visit to the bridge was memorable, some local saw me taking pictures and asked me what was so special about it. Funny how people can be so ignorant.

Posted July 25, 2016, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Police were handing these out as we drove over the bridge in mid May/2016

Posted July 24, 2016, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hi Irma Hale and Ben Tate. I have added the NB Bridge to the site. Irma Hale your photos numbered 1, 2 and 4 are of the north Bound bridge http://bridgehunter.com/wv/mercer/bh72888/

Ben Tate your photos 5 and 6 are of the NB bridge http://bridgehunter.com/wv/mercer/bh72888/

Royce

Posted July 6, 2016, by Gene Mills (genemills [at] outlook [dot] com)

Thanks Robert, I appreciate the info.

Posted July 1, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

So, what happened to J.R. Manning? I miss his contributions. He always had good stuff, both of the informative and of the humourous.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted June 12, 2016, by Allie Pace (allie4god [at] gmail [dot] com)

I lived in Addison, Ohio(1979-81). With traffic lights at both ends, you were guaranteed a stop on this bridge. I remember waiting on this bridge as a coal truck went by, the bridge shook so hard, my head hit the the car ceiling.(This was before seatbelts.) During this time, a police officer also fell thru the grating on the bridge & broke his leg. At 50, I still freak on suspension bridges! When I talk about this bridge, I know people think I've exaggerated, But here is the proof of its existance & POOR rating. I can't believe it took another 20 years to build a new one.

Posted June 11, 2016, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thanks anonymous. You beat me to it. I just happened to find the tunnel by virtue of Google Maps.

Posted June 11, 2016, by Anonymous
Posted June 11, 2016, by April Waldron (awkitten [at] aol [dot] com)

I'm trying to find a date when this tunnel was built.

Posted May 21, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Great news, driver education and enforcement of weight limits!!:

http://wvpress.org/news/historic-wheeling-bridge-see-weight-...

Cheat Lake Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 10, 2016, by William Graff (wrg2112 [at] aol [dot] com)

What is the approximate height of the bridge at the roadway?

Posted April 15, 2016, by Dan Robie (drobie [at] carolina [dot] rr [dot] com)

This tunnel is lost deeper in time as compared to the other Parkersburg Branch tunnels that were either daylighted or bypassed with a cut in the tunnel project of 1963. B&O daylighted Tunnel#23 in 1943 because of frequent problems with backwater flooding from Walker Creek/ Little Kanawha River.

Posted April 15, 2016, by Dan Robie (drobie [at] carolina [dot] rr [dot] com)

That is the original B&O cantilever bridge that spanned the Kanawha River. As steam power became larger and heavier through the years, this structure restricted what types could run the Ohio River line . In 1947, it was replaced with the heavy truss bridge that exists today and opened the line for 2-8-2 Mikes, 4-6-2 Pacifics, etc.

Aetnaville Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted April 8, 2016, by lee (leetrichell [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Save this beautiful historical bridge. It's a beauty from another era. It's painful to see how easy people do away with the old and replace with new and boring. I adore this beautiful bridge and hopefully someday, if someone doesn't do away with her, I get to see this old bridge in person.. She still stands now in need of many repairs but look at what can be done and the results.. Don't elect a twenty year old who is too young to appreciate historical structures in that town to make vital and horrible decisions. It's like throwing a beautiful priceless piece of art in the trash.. Restore and paint the Aetnaville Bridge.. Don't destroy...... Restore....

Aetnaville Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted March 25, 2016, by Mark Yurina (markyurina [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is now closed to pedestrians as each portal is fenced off.

Posted March 24, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted March 21, 2016, by Robert Elder

As far as I know, there is no access to the eastern portal. I am not sure if it is still visible at the surface.

Posted March 21, 2016, by Gene Mills (genemills [at] outlook [dot] com)

Just curious, is there access to the east portal? Thanks.

Posted March 20, 2016, by Barry (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

Those tracks look remarkably healthy for a tunnel which has been abandoned since 1950. Is the marker in the right place?

Posted February 15, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nice find Luke!

Posted January 31, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Doomed?

This listing sates 'scheduled for replacement':

http://www.highwaysthroughhistory.com/bridge.aspx?id=32

Posted January 12, 2016, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Yup, the twin to Tug Fork.

Regards,

Art S.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted January 12, 2016, by Mark (mcbell1961 [at] aol [dot] com )

It did have a metal grate floor. It made driving over it a little unnerving, especially when the grates shook and rattled.

Posted January 9, 2016, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Sure looks to be a Whipple with a Camelback format.

Posted January 9, 2016, by Margot

Nice. Is that a camelback Whipple?

Posted January 5, 2016, by Mark Frazier (mfrazier404 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Postcard view of what I believe was the original bridge at this location.

Capon Lake Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted December 24, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

More likely they just had similar designs... the additional photos in the nomination which were not available when I earlier commented on this bridge, show a more traditional design of lower chord connection than Columbia Bridge Works ever used in this period. I have only seen one other bridge from this period of Penn Bridge, although my findings was the company at the time was T. and S. White, for Timothy B. White and Samuel P. White, not just T B White.

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=pe...

Capon Lake Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted December 24, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

While it looks like a CBW, it was erected by T.B. White and Sons:

http://www.wvculture.org/shpo/nr/pdf/hampshire/11000929.pdf

Is it possible they were initially buying kits from other fabricators and simply erectors until they moved across the river and became Penn Bridge Co.?

Kanawha Falls Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted December 18, 2015, by Frank Miller (thewvnomad [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yes, this used to have a toll on it. If my memory serves me correctly ( I was pretty young at the time) there was a bus used a house that the toll collector lived in. Many of the local residents still call it the "Silver Bridge" since it was silver for many years. It was painted green sometime in the early 1980's or so.

Posted October 30, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Closed due to accident then fixed and reopened in two days:

http://www.theintelligencer.net/page/content.detail/id/64568...

Posted October 7, 2015, by Willy Nelson (willynwv [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge is currently being demolished and site is being prepared for construction of replacement span.

Capon Lake Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted September 2, 2015, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If you actually want to see real photos of this bridge they are here... the bridge is altered, but top chord end post looks much like Columbia Bridge Works https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Whipple_Truss_%2...

Posted September 1, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Actually, per the 2013 Historic Bridge Inventory, this bridge is a pre-stressed concrete channel beam. Perhaps it once functioned as a Burr Arch, but like many covered bridges, it is today merely a decoration on top of a modern bridge.

Mill Creek Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 28, 2015, by Dolores Durst (dmdurst [at] cascable [dot] net)

Is this bridge going to be reopened, or replaced? Is so when. It sure is an inconvience having to go around.

West End Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 13, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The green I see in these photos is a standard color West Virginia uses all over the state for the few truss bridges it actually bothers to repaint. So I assume the university having matching colors is coincidental.

West End Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 12, 2015, by Cassie (greydelislefan [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was repainted green in 1999, presumably to reference the local Marshall University, whose colors are green and white. Before the repainting it had significantly rusted. I remember as a young kid being afraid of going over the bridge because it looked so bad to me.

Dunbar Toll Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 10, 2015, by Bill Legg

Tom, the reason there is a truck restriction right now is because they are working on the sidewalk areas, making them accessible to handicap persons, not because of any weakness to the bridge itself. They need room to work, so they have narrowed the lanes down, so trucks can't really get through. One tried a couple of weeks ago and found out that they weren't kidding.

Dunbar Toll Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted August 3, 2015, by Tom Hoffman

I was driving through Charleston about a week ago. From I-64 there was an electronic sign saying no truck access to Dunbar Toll Bridge. Not a good sign! I'm glad I got to cross and get up close to the bridge about two years ago. Because it is a significant cantaliever truss bridge, it would be a shame to lose it.

Posted August 3, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I thought I recognized this bridge. It is adjacent to the Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum in Weston, WV. The Asylum, which was later renamed the Weston State Hospital is now a museum. If you visit this bridge, be sure to take a tour of the Asylum! (or vice-versa).

Posted June 30, 2015, by Dave

Area after reclaiming.

Posted June 30, 2015, by Dave

The substructure was completely gone.

Posted June 30, 2015, by Dave

More Pictures. Note that old Railroad rails were used for Bents.

Posted June 30, 2015, by Dave

This bridge was demolished in May 2015.

Memorial Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted June 25, 2015, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I enjoyed going in the east portal because you would go across the bridge into the tunnel that was high on the mountainside.

Headsville Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 4, 2015, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wrought Iron Bridge Co.

Headsville Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 4, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Found some pictures, glad it's being bypassed/saved:

http://rs.locationshub.com/Slideshow.aspx?lid=059-10040178&i...

Does anyone recognize the builders plaques?

Regards,

Art S.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 3, 2015, by george oakley (georgeoaakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

thanks for clearing that up chet.i forgot that when you go over those truss bridges they do make noise like singing.now I can drink at home.

Memorial Toll Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 2, 2015, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 2, 2015, by John Marvig

More likely than not, it had a metal grate deck which produced noise. Some 20th century truss bridges had that.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 2, 2015, by Patrick Feller (nakrnsm [at] aol [dot] com)

And the Piano Bridge in Fayette County, Texas got its name from the sound made when driving over its decking.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 2, 2015, by Chet Gehman (gehmanc2000 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

He might mean "singing" bridge. Some roads and bridges have transverse grooves cut in the roadway for traction in bad weather that will make a high-pitched tone at certain speeds. Parts of I-287 in northern New Jersey are like that--a singing highway.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 2, 2015, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

singing bridge?dont you mean a swinging bridge?never heard a bridge sing.that would be a first.gotta get drunk for that one.maybe sing along the drunker I get.

Shadle Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted May 1, 2015, by John Goold (BlueWilliamus [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge was a singing bridge

Posted March 16, 2015, by Zachary S

Now gone.

Kanawha Falls Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted March 14, 2015, by Robert Thompson

I drove past this one on the way back from Bridge Day 2014. I had a lot of miles to cover, though, and was unable to take time for pictures.

Got some rather unusual ones of the New River Gorge Bridge the day before, though...

Kanawha Falls Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted March 12, 2015, by Zachary S

As per a couple of 2012 news articles, plans to replace the bridge have apparently been set forth.

Wheeling Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted February 28, 2015, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Answers: Only a few seconds, the tubes are only 1,518 feet long (a little longer than a quarter mile) and yes, you can see all the way through them. The 7th photo in the sequence was taken from the west portal of the eastbound tube when it was under renovation.

The location of the engineering firm referenced in the earlier posting was taken from the Wheeling newspaper. If the information is incorrect, it was incorrect from the source.

Posted February 23, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted February 18, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Very little (and some apparently incorrect) information on this bridge both here on Bridgehunter as well as on other contemporary internet sources like Wikipedia, and someone even voted this bridge with very few stars here on BH. As such, I am happy to present, hot off the press in the current update stream, the HistoricBridges.org research results for this bridge http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse... which revealed detailed articles about the construction of this bridge in period engineering literature. Innovative methods were used to construct this bridge without disruption of railroad traffic, while also altering and reusing the original stone piers with unique "pier girders." Literature also provided an apparent explanation for four panels of pin-connected eyebar in the bottom chord of an otherwise rivet-connected truss which was to enable "closing" of the bridge as the ends of the span were erected outward via cantilever method to meet in the middle. Finally, my research indicates that the 1904 reference is an error. I could not find that any significant event happened with this bridge in 1904. The bridge seen today was completed in 1913, using portions of the previous bridge's stone piers.

Posted February 17, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There is a lot going on here bridgewise. (Okay, I don't think that bridgewise is a word, but I digress). Two railroads cross the Bluestone River in this vicinity. This small road crosses the Bluestone River directly under the highest railroad bridge. It then passes under the lower railroad before the lower railroad crosses the Bluestone River. Is everybody confused yet?

To make matters even worse, the NBI had this bridge located off the west coast of Panama.

Posted February 16, 2015, by Dave King (DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You are correct Nathan and I appreciate you pointing it out. Kind of strange indeed. I have removed the image.

Posted February 16, 2015, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Dave,

I think the postcard you added is actually for a different bridge around the corner. Strange that a postcard would feature a stringer, but count the railing balusters and note the flat deck (no hump) and is thus seems to match the stringer. http://www.historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowse...

Posted February 7, 2015, by Robert Elder

I don't know how it was done from an engineering standpoint. I will have to post a link to WVNC Rails, which has much information. The native stone seems to be the oldest material, followed by brick, and then cinder block.

Lowering the floors was what caused the old Eaton Tunnel to collapse.

Posted February 7, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

That must have been quiet a job. Do you know the process? I don't know much about vaulted structures so it's a puzzle to me how this was done.

Posted February 7, 2015, by Robert Elder

In some of the tunnels such as the Brandy Gap Tunnel, they did lower the floor. But in other tunnels such as this one, the ceiling was raised. Both methods were used along this line. The only tunnel got completely replaced in 1963 was the Eaton Tunnel. That one is concrete. It would make sense that the railroad might recycle materials from the daylighted tunnels since they were so close to the ones that got enlarged. Just a theory I thought of the other night.

Posted February 7, 2015, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The tunnels I'm familiar with are cast concrete. When they increased vertical clearance they did so by lowering the rail bed rather than removing the ceiling, excavating additional clearance, then replacing the ceiling. This may explain the original brick and stone still being in place.

Posted February 6, 2015, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This tunnel, like many others had its clearance increased in 1963. Of course, a taller bore would have required extra brick and stone. Both materials can be found on the ceiling of this, and other NBRT tunnels. This repeated pattern leads me to wonder if stone and or brick from the daylighted tunnels was used to increase the bore size in the remaining tunnels such as this one. Looks like another research project...

Posted January 29, 2015, by Buddy Clem (buddy [dot] clem [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced by a modern 3 lane bridge. It is laid out as 1 lane uphill and 2 lanes down. There was no room for a second bridge, or anything wider than 3 lanes. It is beautiful and safe and well lit, but it still is sad to see an old bridge go. It was severely rusted and structurally deficient and had a 5 ton weight limit. There were concerns that it could collapse like the old Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant in the 1960's. Please update the page. There are not very many crossings across the Kanawha River and they are miles apart, so the bridge replacement increased commute times by many minutes up to at least an hour at times. Love the website and I also love bridges and tunnels too.

Posted January 25, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 16, 2015, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted January 16, 2015, by Richard A Johnson (revrjohnson [at] juno [dot] com)

Many fond memories crossing the bridge whether in a car or the old street car.

Gauley River Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted January 13, 2015, by Rock Foster (rock [at] lhtot [dot] com)

In 2000 this bridge was officially named by the WV Legislature - "Hughes Bridge".

Armstrong Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted January 5, 2015, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

This looks like a fine place for a submarine race!

Armstrong Tunnel (West Virginia)
Posted January 5, 2015, by Michael Miller (michael_a_miller [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I too remember the strong Creosote smell in the tunnel from when I lived in St. Albans in the mid 1990s. At that time, the famous TV Evangelist T.D. Jakes lived about a half mile from the tunnel.

I always wondered if it was originally built as a railroad tunnel? There is a CSX tunnel parallel to the Armstrong Tunnel just a very short distance away. Anyone know if this was the case? I have a hard time believing that a vehicular tunnel was constructed in 1900.

Glade Creek Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted December 10, 2014, by nate marvin (natemarvin [at] yahoo [dot] com)

When I was younger My father was an avid Skydiver/Base jumper. On October 22,1989 he and some fellow base jumpers jumped off of the Glade Creek bridge. Unfortunately my father was badly injured as a result of this, but some pretty amazing first responders, surgeons, and a helicopter pilot that was unbelievably talented saved his life and his limbs. I am going to take a day trip to see the bridge that kicked my dads butt and bring him some pictures and some rocks from the river bed.

Aetnaville Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted November 20, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted November 19, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

To me it looks like a suspension/cable stayed bridge with stiffening trusses - albeit very large stiffening trusses. I might even reverse my though to suggest it is a truss with a stiffening suspension.

Either way, if the eastern span of the Bay Bridge develops problems in the next few years, then maybe they should call this guy to fix it.

Posted November 19, 2014, by Anonymous

Git-R-Done! I need to finish in time for Duck Dynasty.

Posted November 19, 2014, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

As Jeff Foxworthy would say...

If you build a bridge that looks like this:

...You might be a redneck!

Posted November 18, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Chris:

Glad you found the information to be useful. One of the best sources for information about this line is WVNC Rails, ran by Dan Robie.

http://wvncrails.weebly.com/

Posted November 17, 2014, by Chris Cates

Great photos and information, Robert. It makes me want to take a trip out to West Virginia....when it gets warmer.

Tunnelton Footbridge (West Virginia)
Posted November 17, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Doomed:

http://wvpublic.org/post/historic-bridge-tunnelton-come-down

An early 20th century pedestrian bridge in Tunnelton is coming down.

Credit SieBot / wikimedia commons

The bridge spanning CSX tracks is scheduled to be demolished on Tuesday. CSX says the bridge was built in 1912 in the Preston County town.

 Tom Mercer with Orders Construction tells The Dominion Post that a crew will remove the top part of the bridge after Mon Power cuts power to lines stretching along the span. Then the bridge's steps and concrete piers will be demolished. Eighty-two-year-old Virgie McGill tells the newspaper that she will miss the bridge. She says it's a big part of Tunnelton.

Posted November 17, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have just added another batch of tunnels to this website. Once again, if any locals know the common names, please let me know so I can edit the entry.

Raifans, locals, and tunnel enthusiasts...enjoy...

Aetnaville Bridge (West Virginia)
Posted November 1, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted October 30, 2014, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I spent about an hour in this tunnel this morning. I will upload photos as soon as I can. Because this tunnel was bypassed in 1963 it retains a very high degree of historical integrity. One can clearly see that the stone is the original material and the brick was just use for patch work. Although it is not the longest tunnel on the trail, it is perhaps one of the most significant given it's relarively unaltered condition.