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CN - Oconto Swing Bridge

Photos 

CN RR Oconto Swing Bridge 1

Looking downriver (east)

Photo taken by Robert Thompson

Enlarge

BH Photo #162367

Map 

Description 

The Oconto river was used to transport logs from the Northern Highlands to the Great Lakes for shipment. The swing span allowed tugboats to pass upriver to tow logs.

Facts 

Overview
Pony/through plate girder bridge over Oconto River on Canadian National Railway
Location
Oconto, Oconto County, Wisconsin
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1911
Builder
- American Bridge Co. of New York
Railroads
- Canadian National Railway (CN)
- Chicago & North Western Railway (CNW)
Design
While the rollers and gears are still in place, the mechanism is so rusted it will never move again.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 60.0 ft.
Total length: 210.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+44.88253, -87.88242   (decimal degrees)
44°52'57" N, 87°52'57" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/430309/4970279 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Oconto West
Elevation
582 ft. above sea level
Inventory number
BH 44863 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • March 30, 2016: New photos from John Marvig
  • April 13, 2010: Added by Robert Thompson

Sources 

Comments 

CN RR Oconto Swing Bridge
Posted April 13, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Don't come to Michigan and try to tell us we can't get a swing bridge moving again! The restored New Richmond Bridge is now functional again (for special events) despite not moving since c. 1930. http://www.historicbridges.org/truss/57th/index.htm

CN RR Oconto Swing Bridge
Posted April 13, 2010, by Anthony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

HAHAHA......J.R. only you could introduce P.B. Blaster to this site!!!

But hey.......you know you could suggest it to them as a new promotional deal!!

"Not even decades of rust can deter the amazing power of P.B. Blaster.......watch as we spin this swing-span around like a propeller!"

CN RR Oconto Swing Bridge
Posted April 13, 2010, by J.R. Manning (thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

"While the rollers and gears are still in place, the mechanism is so rusted it will never move again. "

I wonder if B'Laster sells this stuff in 55 gallon drums?