Rating:
5 votes

WSOR - Wisconsin River Back Channel Bridge

Photos 

Bridge is in the background

Photo taken by Lance

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND)

View this photo on Flickr

BH Photo #241682

Map 

Description 

Trusses built 1888 as an approach span to Omaha Bridge #15 in St. Paul, relocated here in 1915. Through girders relocated from an unknown location to here in 1915.

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over Wisconsin River on Abandoned Wisconsin Southern Railroad
Location
Sauk City, Dane County, Wisconsin
Status
Closed to all traffic
History
Built 1888 in St. Paul, Minnesota; Relocated Here in 1915
Builder
- Keystone Bridge Co. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Railroads
- Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad (MILW; CMStP&P; CMStP)
- Wisconsin & Calumet Railroad (WICT)
- Wisconsin & Southern Railroad (WSOR)
Design
Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 150.0 ft.
Total length: 425.0 ft.
Also called
MILW - Wisconsin River Back Channel Bridge
WICT - Wisconsin River Back Channel Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+43.26365, -89.72420   (decimal degrees)
43°15'49" N, 89°43'27" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/278901/4793697 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Sauk City
Inventory number
BH 54069 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • April 10, 2018: New photos from John Marvig
  • December 6, 2016: Updated by John Marvig: Added Build Date
  • July 3, 2013: Updated by John Marvig: Bridge is a pratt through truss
  • October 21, 2012: Added by Luke Harden

Sources 

Comments 

WSOR - Wisconsin River Back Channel Bridge
Posted April 10, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

A very interesting bridge. The trusses are confirmed to have been relocated from St. Paul, Minnesota. They were originally built in 1888 and moved here in 1915. However, the approach girders are also interesting. They are examples of some of the earliest girders I've seen for railroad use. A bridge in Minnesota built by the same railroad used 1879 deck girders (as confirmed by blueprints and railroad records):

https://bridgehunter.com/mn/fillmore/bh36297/

Thoughts to the idea of the approach girders?

Wisconsin River Back Channel Bridge
Posted November 17, 2012, by Robert Thompson

The Back Channel Bridge is in the far, far background. That's the main channel Swing Bridge ( http://bridgehunter.com/wi/sauk/bh46753/ ) in the foreground.