Rating:
No votes cast

BNSF - Skykomish River Bridge

Share:

Photos 

Photo taken by Neil Martel in April 2012

Enlarge

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Warren through truss bridge over Skykomish River on BNSF Railway
Location
Snohomish County, Washington
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1962 for the Great Northern Railway during the Index-East Gold Bar realignment
Design
8 panel Warren through truss
Also called
Great Northern Skykomish River Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+47.83542, -121.66053   (decimal degrees)
47°50'08" N, 121°39'38" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/600234/5298877 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Gold Bar
Inventory number
BH 51970 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

BNSF Railway (746)
Built 1962 (133)
Built during 1960s (1,379)
Deck girder (2,845)
Girder (5,062)
Great Northern Railway (160)
Have street view (15,918)
Open (31,213)
Owned by railroad (6,235)
Plate girder (3,721)
Railroad (8,123)
Snohomish County, Washington (94)
Through truss (10,653)
Truss (25,525)
Warren through truss (1,159)
Warren truss (4,543)
Washington (959)

Update Log 

  • April 13, 2012: Updated by Neil Martel: Updated design description
  • April 8, 2012: New Street View added by Neil Martel
  • April 6, 2012: Updated by Neil Martel: Corrected history
  • April 6, 2012: Updated by Daniel Hopkins: Added category "Railroad"

Sources 

  • Neil Martel

Comments 

BNSF - Skykomish River Bridge
Posted February 6, 2014, by Evin Fairchild (evindfair [at] gmail [dot] com)

I've seen those piers before and of course I always knew they were from an old bridge. Now, my question is, which bridge? You'd think this bridge was the first to span this part of the river when they realigned the railroad through here in the 1960s. Those piers couldn't have been an old hwy bridge either, because the current deck truss bridge allowed for US 2 to be realigned off of its old route along what is now Reiter Road, which, like the old RR alignment was on the N side of Skykomish River.

My only guess is that those old piers must have been a bridge that carried a spur railroad track that went to the quarries. Was this what those old piers were from?