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Jorgenson Slough Bridge

Photos 

Jorgenson Slough Bridge

View from Northeast

Photo taken by K. A. Erickson in April 2011

Enlarge

BH Photo #197823

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Timber stringer bridge over Jorgenson Slough on US 101
Location
Pacific County, Washington
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1939
Design
Timber stringer
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 17.1 ft.
Total length: 69.9 ft.
Deck width: 29.5 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+46.50111, -123.88639   (decimal degrees)
46°30'04" N, 123°53'11" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/431987/5150108 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Nemah
Average daily traffic (as of 2016)
2,719
Inventory number
BH 48687 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of May 2018)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 61 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Categories 

Beam (14,026)
Built 1939 (721)
Built during 1930s (11,079)
Doomed (1,064)
Have street view (25,079)
Open (38,342)
Owned by state (14,936)
Pacific County, Washington (27)
Span length under 25 feet (6,406)
Timber stringer (3,592)
Total length 50-75 feet (8,914)
US 101 (105)
Washington (1,192)

Update Log 

  • April 24, 2011: Added by K. A. Erickson

Sources 

  • K. A. Erickson

Comments 

Jorgenson Slough Bridge
Posted April 25, 2011, by Matt Lohry

Mike,

I agree; it appears to be a timber slab bridge. These timber slabs have been actually used up in Minnesota for new bridges with some regularity recently; the new CR668 bridge in St. Louis County, which replaced a Warren pony in 1988, utilizes this very same design. I'm not sure why they used this type, but they certainly look a lot nicer than a nasty UCEB.

Jorgenson Slough Bridge
Posted April 25, 2011, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] odot [dot] state [dot] or [dot] us)

This bridge isn't much to look at, but I think it might be a rare timber slab bridge. It does not seem to have any spacing between the stringers and it appears as though the members have been bolted together near the ends and rail points in order to act as one load carrying unit.

Any thoughts?