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Vernita Bridge

Photos 

Portal View.

Photo From WSDOT State Route Web

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BH Photo #190306

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Warren through truss bridge over Columbia River on WA 24
Location
Benton County, Washington, and Grant County, Washington
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1965
Design
Simple span Warren through truss, with the appearance of a continuous truss.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 264.1 ft.
Total length: 1,982.1 ft.
Deck width: 27.9 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 16.2 ft.
Also called
Columbia River Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+46.64202, -119.73280   (decimal degrees)
46°38'31" N, 119°43'58" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
11/290858/5169012 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Vernita Bridge
Inventory number
BH 34142 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 03/2016)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 58.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
4,300

Update Log 

  • May 10, 2012: New photos from Mike Goff
  • December 14, 2010: New photos from Nathan Holth
  • December 13, 2010: New Street View added by Nathan Holth
  • May 20, 2009: Updated by Michael Goff

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

Vernita Bridge
Posted February 5, 2014, by Mark Bozanich (markthemapper [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Vernita Bridge was built with three simple trusses so that the center truss could be converted to a vertical lift span. There were plans at one time to build a dam downstream from Vernita and upstream from the Tri-Cities equipped with locks. The Columbia would thus be navigable at Vernita. The dam will not be built now that the dam site is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument.

Vernita Bridge
Posted May 26, 2013, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

My guess is that it was an esthetic decision. It's a nice looking span.

Vernita Bridge
Posted May 25, 2013, by Anonymous

That's really odd. Why do they make it seem like a continuous span when it is really three spans?