Rating:
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Quechee Gorge Bridge

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Photo Credit: Jimmy Emerson, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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Description 

The third bridge built by the railroad in this location. This bridge replaced a wooden arch which may have been preceded by a wooden truss.

Facts 

Overview
Steel arch bridge over Ottauquechee River on US 4 in Hartford
Location
Windsor County, Vermont
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1911; rehabilitated 1989
Builders
- American Bridge Co. of New York
- John Williams Storrs (Designer)
Design
Three-span deck arch bridge
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 188.0 ft.
Total length: 285.1 ft.
Deck width: 29.9 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on October 11, 1990
Also called
Ottauquechee River Bridge
Dewey's Mills Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+43.63721, -72.40851   (decimal degrees)
43°38'14" N, 72°24'31" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/709035/4834843 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Quechee
Inventory numbers
NRHP 90001490 (National Register of Historic Places reference number)
BH 34096 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection (as of 06/2011)
Deck condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Good (7 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 57.0 (out of 100)
Average daily traffic (as of 1998)
9,400

Update Log 

  • June 20, 2014: Updated by Clark Vance: Added categories "Railroad", "Woodstock Railway"
  • December 31, 2012: New photo from Bill Culp
  • May 24, 2012: Updated by Will Truax: Added design engineer
  • August 29, 2011: New Street View added by Nathan Holth
  • October 17, 2009: Updated by C Hanchey: Bridge is known as the Quechee Gorge Bridge

Sources 

Comments 

Quechee Gorge Bridge
Posted November 10, 2013, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Despite a short burst silliness at the beginning of this vid it is well worth a watch for both the history it unfolds for this bridge, and for some of the rare imagery it shares.

Having a particular fondness for both images of wooden trusses under construction and those of falsework, I find the shots of the Deck Howe that preceded Storrs' Arch and its 160' falsework hugely interesting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVotRk3HS2A

A history of The QGB prepared for its National Register nomination - http://www.crjc.org/heritage/V11-30.htm