Rating:
3 votes

County Road 616 Wallens Creek (Martin Creek) Bridge

Photo 

Wallens Creek Bridge

Most likely (95% certain) this is a Columbia Bridge Co. (CBW) build between 1886 and 1889

Photo taken by Timothy Phillips on August 31,2018

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BH Photo #500640

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Warren through truss bridge over Wallens Creek (Martin Creek) on County Road 616
Location
Lee County, Virginia
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1886-1889 (probably by Columbia Bridge Co. successors to CBW/D.H. & C.C. Morrison), relocated in1932
Builders
- Columbia Bridge Co. of Dayton, Ohio (probable builder)(successors to) [also known as Columbia Bridge Works]
- Columbia Bridge Works of Dayton, Ohio (AKA)
- D.H. & C.C. Morrison of Dayton, Ohio [also known as Columbia Bridge Works]
Design
Pin-connected Warren through truss with alternating verticals
Dimensions
Span length: 85.0 ft.
Total length: 85.0 ft.
Deck width: 13.1 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 15.4 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+36.63265, -83.17140   (decimal degrees)
36°37'58" N, 83°10'17" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/305858/4056318 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Hubbard Springs
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
247
Inventory numbers
VA 10807 (Virginia bridge number)
BH 33734 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of May 2018)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 48.7 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • June 23, 2021: Updated by Art Suckewer: Added probable builder with build date range based on the builder
  • February 19, 2020: Updated by Art Suckewer: altered original build date

Sources 

  • Calvin Sneed - us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Art Suckewer - Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com

Comments 

County Road 616 Wallens Creek (Martin Creek) Bridge
Posted June 23, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

1. George mentioned picture 21. There were none this evening.

2. I have evidence supporting my CBCo. claim but I haven't finished prepping it. I just didn't want to forget about this one so I marked it as probable. More to come... :^)

Regards,

Art S.

County Road 616 Wallens Creek Bridge
Posted February 19, 2020, by George A Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I noticed 2 crosses by the bridge in picture #21.Did these people pass away at the bridge?

County Road 616 Wallens Creek Bridge
Posted February 19, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Totally agree with Nathan.

Now, who made it and where was it originally erected? To me the portals are replacements added when it was put up at its present home.

We now know Columbia Bridge Works / Columbia Bridge Co. made pin connected Warrens: https://bridgehunter.com/oh/montgomery/bh88020/ (although the Ohio example does not have CBWs signature endposts). They advertised that they made railroad bridges (though none are known). They also are known to have worked in Virginia.

Although a Whipple, the Capon Lake Bridge https://bridgehunter.com/wv/hampshire/capon-lake/ shares certain fabrication elements (such as the endposts). However, Capon was built by TB White & Sons, which would eventually become Penn Bridge Co. (once one of the sons returned home with an engineering degree and the company reorganized across the river in Beaver Falls, PA). Prior to their move to Beaver Falls, I am of the belief that TB White & Sons bought 'kits' from other builders and merely finished and erected iron trusses as they transitioned from wooden trusses.

Anybody have any thoughts on this one? Did anyone else use these distinctive elements?

Regards,

Art S.

County Road 616 Wallens Creek Bridge
Posted December 19, 2016, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This is a pin-connected Warren through truss. As such it likely in reality dates to the 1880s, certainly not 1932. Also looks like it might be a former railroad bridge. This is a highly significant historic bridge.