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Posted August 12, 2018, by Luke

Hopefully the tunnels don't catch on fire as easily as his cars :')

Posted August 12, 2018, by Don

Tunnel is so last century. I vote that we start calling them "bores" since Elon's Boring Company now makes tunnels.

They also sell flamethrowers, so we could call this a flame war. Lol

Posted August 12, 2018, by Luke

1) All 5 of the NBI entries refer to it as a tunnel (As does everyone from the federal, state, and local governments to news outlets to highway fanatics.), and as I already stated, stringer is the typical roof construction method for cut-and-cover tunnels, but I guess paying attention is hard.

2) This tunnel passes under a park built upon the backfill used to bury the it.

3) And now you're being willfully obtuse and willfully ignoring the actual engineering/design differences between cut-and-cover tunnels and overpasses.

Literalism and pedantry don't trump actual engineering.

Posted August 12, 2018, by Anonymous

I thought tubes were tubes and stringers were stringers.

I suppose you could make an argument for the tubes as they are actually under something. This "tunnel" is not under anything, a pretty standard definition of tunnel. Otherwise do we start adding all the wide stringers as tunnels, cities are full of them, not to mention NBI (the gospel) lists it as stringers. And yea, the common and reasonable definition of something is generally best used, don't you think?

Royce

Posted August 12, 2018, by Anonymous

You can ignore engineering techniques for your own personal opinion all you Like, it doesn't mean you're in the right.

Cut-and-cover (Which are typically stringer-roofed trenches.), along with immersed tubes (Used frequently in your home state, Royce.) are forms of tunnel construction, despite not being litetally tunneled through rock.

Ignoring this for a literalist view is extremely idiotic.

Posted August 12, 2018, by Anonymous

Seems if it wasn't tunneled it is not a tunnel, hence the word tunnel. NBI has it listed as steel stringers

Posted August 11, 2018, by Luke

I've found several references to this being a "cut-and-cover" tunnel project , which is how most tunnels are built nowadays, especially when being built in already-built-up metropolitan areas

Citing sites that refer to it as cut-and-cover:

http://www.angelfire.com/va2/Route66/Background.html

http://www.dcroads.net/roads/I-66_VA/

http://wwwtripwithinthebeltway.blogspot.com/2015/02/i-66-add...

Posted August 11, 2018, by Anonymous

Let's all be like Elsa. Let it go. Let it go.

Posted August 11, 2018, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

"even VDOT calls it a tunnel" LOL, well if the government says so it must be true.

Posted August 11, 2018, by Anonymous

Funny, because even VADOT calls it a tunnel

Posted August 11, 2018, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is not a tunnel

Posted August 8, 2018, by Anonymous

I think the bridge and tunnel should be two separate entries.

Posted July 30, 2018, by Zachary S

Alright so, after being restored and repaired in Florida, the bridge is apparently going to be reinstalled near its original location, so far presumed to be for vehicle traffic once more. I don't know how much historical integrity had to be compromised for its repair since it was claimed there was major damage that had to be repaired, but it has been repaired and is scheduled to be reinstalled sometime next year probably. A far better fate than many old rail-crossing road bridges.

Posted July 21, 2018, by Fred Lindenberg (linden1000 [at] aol [dot] com)

I worked on this bridge for a short time as a field engineer with American Bridge Company in 1963...Mack Oliver was the job superintendent

Posted May 17, 2018, by Susan Lea Rudd (susanlearudd [at] yahoo [dot] com)

According to my Grandpa, who was in his 20s when the BRP was being constructed, this bridge was built by Italian stonemasons. He was courting my Grandma at the time and they were boarding at the Webb home. Grandpa worked on the Round Meadow Bridge just south of this one.

Posted April 29, 2018, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)
Posted April 3, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The bridge is visible in this film made on 20 Sep 1944:

https://youtu.be/WjadMxpXprk?t=4m16s

Posted April 3, 2018, by Luke

Timestamped version: https://youtu.be/WjadMxpXprk?t=2m

Posted April 2, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Most of this truss bridge collapsed in an accident Feb 24, 1977 which may explain why many members are bolted since I assume most of the truss is a replica. http://www.dailypress.com/features/history/dp-look-back-acci...

This is one of the more spectacular vertical lift accidents I have ever seen. The freightor crashed into the approach truss, which rested on on the freighter for a time (it was dislocated off the pier onto the ship) before the tower finally collapsed, which in turn dragged the lift span into the water. The other tower survived however.

Posted April 2, 2018, by ........b24

predecessor to this........

Posted March 26, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Kyle, do you live near this bridge? I am curious if you have or could take a photo of the plaque visible in the photo, its located on the center span girder, far end. It would likely tell us who built the bridge.

Posted March 26, 2018, by Kyle Obermiller (obermillerkyle [at] gmail [dot] com)

Closed to thru traffic March 2018

Posted March 5, 2018, by Andy (awmycroft [at] yahoo [dot] com)

For better or worse the City of Hampton is in the process of replacing this bridge - new bridge isn't open as of March 2018

Posted February 20, 2018, by PETE (scrungee [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The photo is of the Hardware river bridge at Route 6, that was replaced a few years ago by a more modern bridge.

Posted January 1, 2018, by Thomas l Cooke (madscotsman26 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I'm doing research on the Coleman bridge and the surrounding area.

I'm researching the History of the Coleman bridge built from 1950-1952 in West Point Virginia. What i'm looking for is a list of employees that were working on that project if possible. Carpenters, foremen,engineers, concrete workers, steel workers etc. I'm aware of personnel confidentiality policies but i think enough time has passed and most of these people have passed away that it shouldn't be a issue but more of what i'm looking for, Historical documentation only. Thank you for any help you may lend to my project. Thomas Cooke 307 S. Lubec, Rd. Lubec, Maine 04652 207-733-4247

Posted December 10, 2017, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks luke.There are composite metals that are used in all kinds of applications.I forgot about wood and metal as in bridges.

Posted December 10, 2017, by Luke

Dana is correct. When trusses are referred to as "combination" or "composite", they're referring to the mixed use of timber and metal parts.

Posted December 10, 2017, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

You have a good point there,Dana and Kay.Didn't look at it that way.Thanks.

Posted December 10, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Believe it may refer defer to composite of wood and metal probably Iron. Will defer to more knowledgeable pontists for definitive answer.

Posted December 10, 2017, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have a question.I see the word composite used in the pictures of this bridge.I've dealt with composite metals in the past.Is this bridge made out of composite materials?From what I remember composite metals are more than one metal.

Posted December 9, 2017, by Anonymous

It seems like this railroad built multiple wooden truss bridges- there is another that is abandoned farther down the line. Who knows, there may have been even more than these two! https://bridgehunter.com/va/cumberland/cartersville/

Posted December 9, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Is this a rare wooden railroad truss? It certainly seems to to me!

Posted November 27, 2017, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Those stone arch approaches must be far older than 1932. 1882 is a lot closer to the appropriate date.

Posted November 25, 2017, by John Marvig

I would consider this worthy of being here. Itís the internet, not a book. I guess Iíve never seen a reason why any bridge falling into a historical category would be unworthy. Yes, it clutters the site but in reality,

It only slows down searching by a couple of seconds.

Posted November 24, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Royce,

I didn't post because I didn't consider it worthy of being here. I read your listing as an implication that this is the remains of a bridge. Whereas I see it as complete as is. Hence the enquiry.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 24, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

NBI calls it a through arch but street view differs.

Posted November 24, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Yes, a siding, and yes, it's a bridge. A beautiful old monster--pure functionality.

Posted November 24, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Need help identifying the rail yard here. was just south of the current Richmond NS south Yard. Was still in existence in 1969.

Thanks Royce

Posted November 24, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am unsure. I added it because it bridged a couple of roads. Do you think I should remove it?

Royce

Posted November 24, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Was this a bridge or has it always been an elevated siding?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted November 23, 2017, by Luke

Historicaerials confirms there was a Seaboard track below at one point.

Posted November 23, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I did not see a current RR either. NBI gives it as crossing a yard and since Main Street station and trainshed is half a block away, I assumed at some point there must have been a spur.

Royce

Posted November 21, 2017, by John Marvig

In the last photo, looks like the bridge was built between 1900 and 1910 by American Bridge Company.

Posted November 13, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This page is a duplicate of http://bridgehunter.com/va/cumberland/5741/

Posted October 17, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like this bridge is no longer operating.

Posted October 17, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

It looks like this bridge is no longer operating.

Posted October 1, 2017, by Anonymous

L3v3l one is ground level. The other crossing levels are above it.

Posted September 24, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge no longer operates, but the original bridge is now shown as a pedestrian bridge.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

http://untappedcities.com/2011/10/05/centralia-pennsylvania-...

What clueless person let that number become official?

Posted September 10, 2017, by Luke
Posted September 10, 2017, by Anonymous

Likely.............

Posted September 10, 2017, by Anonymous

Being as it's on Route 666, you'll likely burn in HELL if you cross it!

Posted September 10, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Topos as far back as 1950 have the current Norfolk & Western alignment, but back in 1892 this was the original railroad.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Luke

The narrowness suggests RR to me.

Posted September 10, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is it possible this was an old rail bridge? The span looks pretty light but the abutments scream Railroad? Any RR guru have old track line maps around here?

Royce

Posted August 30, 2017, by Kerstin (KerstinDarling [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hello, just wondering if anyone knows the height of this bridge as its crosses the river.

Posted July 28, 2017, by Zachary S

Well, never mind the rehab and reopening... as of late last year VDOT claimed that the restoration work needed was far more extensive than thought, so it appears by photos that they thew up a new concrete eyesore in its place. The historic bridge is supposed to have been preserved elsewhere but I can't find an article that confirms if this actually happened.

Posted July 13, 2017, by mike huff

Can anyone build this today.

Posted July 4, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

It said on the future projects of this drawbridge, the original bridge will be relocated.

Posted July 4, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This drawbridge is newer than the previous swing now long gone. This must be the only drawbridge in the Delmarva Peninsula version of Virginia.

Posted June 3, 2017, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted May 22, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This rare taper vertical pony truss has been reduced to scrap metal.

Posted May 17, 2017, by Mike Rosenberger (mfrosenberger [at] gmail [dot] com)

Suggested correction: Williams Viaduct connected at 7th Street.

FYI... the bridge it replaced connected at 9th Street. The bridge that replaced the Williams Viaduct connects at 5th Street.

Posted May 8, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Trusses look good, underneath (Pics 30-33)... Not so much.

Looks like heavy salt damage to me.

Posted May 5, 2017, by Anonymous

Nobody Lakes like Gaston

Posted April 16, 2017, by Deborah Jo DOYLE Mason (djdmlm [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am the Great Great Granddaughter of the Doyle who built the Twin-Big Tunnels,as well as the Great Granddaughter of John Wesley Doyle who was the first Engineer through the tunnels.

I am requesting more information as to how to see these tunnels first hand and any historical information about the tunnels.

Other visitors information about food, lodging, and other points of interest would be helpful as well.

Thank You for your help.

Debbie Jo Doyle Mason

Posted April 7, 2017, by Jordan kuehn (Jrkuehn38 [at] aol [dot] com)

Still open for regular traffic with plans of new bridge constructed in 2019

Posted April 6, 2017, by Joel Wyman (jwyman2242 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What a darn shame this couldn't have been preserved as it was a really neat looking multi- span historical bridge. We have lost far too many of these.

Posted April 6, 2017, by Marc Shotts (marcshotts [at] gmail [dot] com )

Visited the bridge on April 4, 2017. Nicely viewed from the suspended pedestrian walk-bridge under the modern Robert E. Lee bridge. Multiple abandoned piers, a couple of which have foundations that are damaged and being undermined and will eventually crumble. Only one span still standing adjacent to Belle Island shore. No decking on bridge.

Posted April 6, 2017, by Kelly McClanahan

Nice photos. The only one I got was part of a train coming out of it 20 some odd years ago.

Posted March 20, 2017, by Beth Hines (hinesbeth2 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has started to fall. I took this photo sometime around October 2016.

Posted March 5, 2017, by Harley

Bridge has been demolished for a replacement as of November 2016

Posted March 4, 2017, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

Thought I'd nailed down which was which with portal details...

You're right, the right PE and "contractor" are key. I've a friend I've done some preservation work with in the Roanoke area, he's done some structural work on one of the Woolwine examples, I'll make sure he's aware of this development.

Posted March 4, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This was a replacement with a modern truss... Not a rehabilitation, unfortunately!

Posted March 4, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It's not a Howe truss. Sort of a Kingpost pony hybrid... AKA "Mongrel" of some kind.

Posted March 4, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted March 4, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looking at the foundations and the low trusses, I'm almost certain that this is the bridge that was blown down in the windstorm. And really it appears that only the "Lid"... siding and roof were blown off of the trusses. While there has been some damage to them the trusses appear to be mostly intact. I believe the other Sinking Creek spans have vertical beams that extend up to the roofline, while this one does not. The siding and roof on this bridge likely were not original, and not historic. If they get the right engineer and contractor (Will?) I believe it can be restored.

Posted March 2, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The curved piers are original to the 1888 N&W bridge. The V&T bridge was the original bridge on the current NS bridge. I have corrected the posting.

Posted March 2, 2017, by Barry (bllauver [at] toad [dot] net)

Were these piers reused for the successor bridge? Was the original bridge, which was burned, also curved?

Posted February 22, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would call them outriggers.

Posted February 22, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is the bracing here note worthy, I do not believe I have seen this before. Is it acting as an outrigger or a vertical? Or both?

Posted February 22, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I am guessing this bridge was not built in 1932. Probably the original bridge here was built in 1932. This looks to be a welded MOB.

Royce

Posted February 21, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

They looked brand new, right out of the box.

Posted February 20, 2017, by Andy Winegar

Nice job capturing the EMD SD70ACe-T4 demonstrators!

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 18, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

My father was a CE with the KS highway Dept ca 1950 and the term he used was "catiwhompus". I haven't run across the exact definition in any of his old books yet.

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 17, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

A non-technical term I like to use for this type of structure is "Womper-Jawed".

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 17, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

Neither have I....crazy/cool engineering

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 17, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Nathan. I have just not encountered many Pratts that looked like this.

Royce

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 17, 2017, by Nathan Holth (nathan [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Unless I am missing something, no there is not, aside from describing its unusual design features of vertical end posts and a heavy skew, but these don't play into the type of truss configuration here. Its basically a Pratt truss with a skew and vertical endposts.

NS Overpass (Virginia)
Posted February 17, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is there a sub category of Pratt for this bridge?

Royce

Posted February 16, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have changed this status back to open. I do not know if they are going to take it down but as of 2/17/2017 it remains open with no work being done on it.

Royce

Posted January 24, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, I will support any effort to reuse historic bridges on trails.

Posted January 24, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

ConTech Continental prefab spans (MOBS) are hard to compete with in terms of cost for short spans (even though they are inferior to a restored historic metal truss bridge). However, once you get into really long span lengths like this, these sorts of modern bridges rapidly become EXTREMELY expensive. They are not standard (higher cost), and they are very inefficient in use of materials (even higher cost). The shear mass of the ugly steel tubes needed to support spans of this length result in a bridge of unparalleled level of ugly, and a bridge that obstructs the view of the river it crosses. A restored historic truss span could have been provided for this budget, providing a structurally superior (wider roadway), long-lasting, signature historic landmark. The efficient, lightweight members would have coexisted with the surrounding area in a much better manner as well.

Posted January 24, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like a MOB to me. I would much rather see relocated historic trusses than MOBs on trails. Thanks to firms such as Workin' Bridges, and Bach Steel, we can save historic trusses that would otherwise be turned into soup cans.

Posted January 24, 2017, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

thinking this was not a 1,000,000 dollar bridge

Posted January 3, 2017, by Paul (Pfarrar79 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been torn down and replaced

Posted December 31, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The bridge probably needs a separate entry.

Posted December 30, 2016, by Luke

From what scant bit of Googling I've done, it's probably just called the "Pepper Tunnel Bridge"

I also think this photo shows a VA B&I plaque: https://imagebase.lib.vt.edu/view_record.php?URN=ns3720

Posted December 30, 2016, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Great find! What's the bridge called?

Posted December 30, 2016, by Kelly McClanahan

Was playing around with my quad maps, and found this one.