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Posted October 24, 2020, by Philip C Walker (pcwalker [dot] tx [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was widened from it's original design to accommodate the widening of US81/US79 that was routed through here. There is another bridge that pre-dates this one, but it was used only to cross the creek. It appears to still be there. There's quite a few of these concrete bridges sitting abandoned throughout Williamson County that once was used for what was then SH 2.

Posted October 14, 2020, by Glenn Celerier

The Paddock Viaduct was the first concrete arch bridge in the United States to employ self-supporting reinforcing steel.

Posted October 14, 2020, by Trenton (trenton [dot] ray [at] gmail [dot] com)

October 7th, 1937, in the Coleman County Chronicle newspaper, a celebration was held and they stated the bridge was reconstructed using a 200 yard span of the old Milburn Bridge which was also washed away during the flood of 1936.

Here's a link, thought it may be of interest to some of you. The pilings are left on the old Milburn bridge but that's it, and it's on private property and generally inaccessible.

I can link to it on Google Maps if there's any interest.

https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth732580/m1/5/z...

Posted October 10, 2020, by Matt Anderson (anderson [dot] commercial [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is another image from Mid July 2020. I've used the Milky Way to silhouette the Waldrip Bridge. After snapping the picture and looking at the screen of my DSLR camera, I knew I was in for a treat. That was just a magical night under the stars and a Texas Sky.

For the photographers out there: 20mm f/1.8 lens, 20.0 s. ISO 1600.

My IG account is Matt4jpeg.

Posted October 2, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony,

Did Vincennes have anything to do with Missouri Valley Bridge and Iron Works? Because the marker text from THC reported that Hess and Skinner were agents for what they called the "Missouri Bridge Company"

https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted October 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Very distinctive plaque that matches those of the Vincennes Bridge Company. I would bet a few bucks that VBC was subcontracted to fabricate the trusses.

Posted October 1, 2020, by Marilyn Tomalavage (marilynt [at] earthlink [dot] net)

Located this bridge yesterday and its in really bad shape, attached are some photos

Posted September 27, 2020, by Ben (Ben [at] profleetservice [dot] com)

Has been replace with new concrete bridge

Posted September 25, 2020, by Tyler

This just seems to be this: http://bridgehunter.com/oh/gallia/adamsville/ but with just one girder instead of two

Posted September 25, 2020, by Fmiser (fmiser [at] gmail [dot] com)

> Also what the heck am I looking at, this bridge confuses me.

There aren't a lot of photos, but what I'm seeing is sort of a single web "solid truss". Yes, "solid" and "truss" are mutually exclusive, but maybe it will help the thought process.

There are two functions.

First is the fins and the center beam make a rigid, load bearing span across space. So those fins are above the beam, so they are under compression - which is a good use for concrete. They are doing pretty much the same thing that a pony or through truss's webs are doing, except these are solid.

The second function is the side-to-side cantilevers that support the deck and transfer the load onto the center beam. This is show by the under-the-deck photos.

Does this help? Or am I answering the wrong question?

Posted September 24, 2020, by Michael Taylor (battlebotguy2 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As it is asymmetrical, with the demolition of the Nine Span Bridge should this be listed as last of it's kind? Being the last notable Asymmetric bridge in the country.

Also what the heck am I looking at, this bridge confuses me.

Posted September 11, 2020, by Rickey Thielen (rickeythielen [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridgde has been replaced by a concrete bridge and the old bridge removed. Verified 9/11/20

Posted September 11, 2020, by Rickey Thielen (rickeythielen [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced by a concrete bridge and the old one removed. Verified 9/11/20

Posted September 7, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Has a Chicago Bridge Company plaque.

Posted August 31, 2020, by Russell Hom-Crosier (veganrussell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Your date of construction is wrong. It was either 1917 or 1918. Now I'm at home so I'm not at the bridge right now, but the year is very clearly written in the concrete. I just don't remember if it said 1917 or 1918.

Posted August 31, 2020, by Jason Smith (flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com)

In case the Person is interested, I would like to nominate this pic for the Bridgehunter's Awards for 2020. :-) JS

Posted August 30, 2020, by Don Morrison

Awesome! That one deserves to be in the running for Jason's bridge photo award.

The stars at night are big and bright ...

Posted August 30, 2020, by Don Morrison

Awesome! That one deserves to be in the running for Jason's bridge photo award.

The stars at night are big and bright ...

Posted August 30, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Neat pic!

Posted August 30, 2020, by Matt Anderson (Anderson [dot] commercial [at] gmail [dot] com)

I took this image in the middle of July, 2020. God bless a Texas sky.

Posted August 14, 2020, by Henry Lombard-Hughes

Very fascinating bridge. Thanks for sharing.

Henry

Posted August 9, 2020, by Anonymous

The bridge has been converted to a one lane bridge with alternating directional lights

Posted August 6, 2020, by Scott Sexton

This photo was taken on March 20, 2014 during the rehabilitation.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Luke

Also, UP intends to replace this bridge.

Posted August 5, 2020, by Luke

Center truss span matches this AmBridge built Harriman Lines Common Standard design.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/lane/bh50689/

Posted August 5, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Was this bridge really built by Phoenix, or is the referenced record referring to a previous bridge at this location?

Posted July 24, 2020, by Robert Williams (williams [dot] robtj [at] gmail [dot] com)

YouTube video taken 7/23/2020

https://youtu.be/N19ck5-fj8k

Posted July 24, 2020, by Rox Ann Johnson (rjohnson [at] cityoflg [dot] com)

This bridge was originally constructed one-half mile south of the bridge on Willow Springs Road. It was located on the old Fayetteville to Industry road and completed in December 1915. However, it was bypassed when State Highway 159 was laid out between the two bridges in the 1920s. The bridge was moved to this site about 1929. The Fayette Heritage Museum and Archives in La Grange has several photographs showing the original approaches being constructed in 1915.

Posted July 24, 2020, by Rox Ann Johnson (rjohnson [at] cityoflg [dot] com)

The bridge was completed on August 6, 1885, soon followed by an all-day picnic celebration. The site was chosen by a bridge engineer, causing the old Fayetteville to Industry road to be diverted to access the new bridge that was one-half mile north of the old crossing. The Fayette Heritage Museum and Archives in La Grange is hoping to find early photographs of this bridge.

Posted July 24, 2020, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Nathan,

I like it. Does anyone have pictures of the other side to see what the other plaque says and if the remains of the ponies are still there?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 23, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

1912 according to the date punched into the portal plate.

Posted July 23, 2020, by John Rich (johnrich3 [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

How old is it?

Posted July 23, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I found historical photos that show this bridge used to have a very cool pony truss approach system.

Posted July 19, 2020, by Connie Krause (m [dot] krause [at] utexas [dot] edu)

Hi!

The bridge is no longer National Register eigible with the reconstruction that it has undergone... I was one of the Consulting Parties on the project.... CK

Posted July 17, 2020, by Anonymous

Replaced by bridge

Posted July 1, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Fully intact in 1995 aerial view. Appears to be partially dismantled in 2004 view, and completely gone by 2008.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Geoff Hubbs (geoffrey [dot] hubbs [at] att [dot] net)

The alignment was the Santa Fe (ATSF) Hamlin Sub, still active as late as 1989, but haven't found anything else about it.

Posted July 1, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I added this bridge because so many people on this website have been good at digging up historical photos and info about long lost bridges. This bridge was in the middle of nowhere so it might be a challenge. But it was a large bridge over a major river. I am sure it was a railroad bridge because we know the previous 1901 highway bridge in this area was closer to the existing highway bridges.

Posted June 23, 2020, by Anonymous

Replaced in the late 80s or early 90s.

Posted June 9, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Just a heads up about this bridge, I field visited it last year and found that the southeast caisson is sinking and/or tipping over. Its definitely lower, and one of the braces between the caissons has been ripped out of the other and the truss is showing some visible distortion. This bridge should be considered at high risk for collapse. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted May 23, 2020, by Rich Curtis (richcurtis510 [at] msn [dot] com)

I would like to find out more about the bridge next to this one that it replaced. It has a wooden roadbed. See pic.

Posted May 15, 2020, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge is having currently closed due to damage to superstructure. Repairs are scheduled to be complete before Memorial day weekend.

Bridge replacement is not on the horizon. TXDOT has supposedly agreed to replace the existing historic bridge with a similar appearing truss bridge.

Posted May 14, 2020, by Roger Deschner (rogerdeschner [at] gmail [dot] com)

My family used to hang out on the beach under the Galveston end of this bridge, because the bridge made a great sunshade. If we wanted sunshine, it was just a few feet away.

Posted May 11, 2020, by Curtis Ortez (curto [at] email [dot] com)

Happens by the Jonesboro bridge last weekend. Curious if the route and it's importance last century.

Posted May 6, 2020, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

Photos from 4/29/2020.

Posted May 6, 2020, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

I will happily take you up on having done the footwork, my friend, and I just submitted a few more photos. If I may, it's "Cemetery". Thanks! 🙂

Posted May 6, 2020, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

Additional photos taken on 4/29/2020

Posted May 6, 2020, by Luke

Steve, there was no previously-added bridge here, so I went and created an entry based off your information!

Posted May 5, 2020, by Kelsee (Kelseemanuel [at] gmail [dot] com)

How do you get to this bridge? My kids live to explore and we have seen this pop up in our searches and would love to go!

Posted April 27, 2020, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted April 25, 2020, by Jeff W Ebner (JeffEbner24 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is sturdy and open to traffic.

Posted April 25, 2020, by Jeff W Ebner (JeffEbner24 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The north access to the bridge had tall grass and ticks on my trip to see it. The previously burnt bridge is slowly being consumed by nature.

Posted April 17, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

I was a little annoyed to discover on Google Maps this in-storage pony truss just steps away from a bowstring truss bridge I visited in person. Although it appears to be in a fenced in wastewater treatment area, so it might be difficult to get photos of despite its proximity to the park and bridge.

Posted April 11, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

As they say, "Follow the money". It would be interesting to see who makes the money from the scrap sale and how they got that right.

Posted April 11, 2020, by Jason Roberts (starskytorino72 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It was sitting on temporary K-rails for the work that they had planned to do to it. Unfortunately, they decided to cut it up rather than move it somewhere for foot traffic or sell it to a bridge restorer. It just infuriates me when history gets tossed into the trash!

Posted April 10, 2020, by Mason (maugherty [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hiked this two days ago. Going strong.

Posted April 10, 2020, by Mason (maugherty [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hiked this two days ago. Going strong.

Posted April 10, 2020, by Luke

You would assume incorrectly, as girder bridges can be quite old.

For example, this 1898 deck girder near me: https://bridgehunter.com/ia/story/bh49288/

Posted April 10, 2020, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The picture shows a modern replacement bridge. I would assume the 1910 bridge was replaced.

Posted April 8, 2020, by Luke

That style of postcard was common in the 1930s-late 1960s

Posted April 8, 2020, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

...that postcard really dates to the 50s? (This bridge has a build year of 1950.) Seems like it'd be older than that.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Betsy Fontenot (betsyfontenot [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was in 4th grade we moved to Kingwood in 1980. Not unlike every teenager, we thought Kingwood was "boring, etc." but one of the things we loved doing in high school, was to gather under the bridges (US59 aka I69 have had at least 2 highway lanes in both directions running right next to this San Jacinto crossing. The bridge had section of the roadway wash away in the flood waters caused by Tropical Storm Allison. The powers that be, chose to build new motor vehicle crossing right beside the Bevel Jarrel but managed to save the old bridge, turning it into a pedestrian bridge. The new nature trail another post mentions I believe is finished, the initial 40 mile section, that is.. Love this newly discovered website! Thanks!

Posted April 7, 2020, by John Marvig

Iíve also seen this design in Colorado. Iím guessing it was a standard design for the railroad. It appears most were built between 1897-1902.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the stone piers with concrete caps I wonder if there was a prior bridge here.

Posted April 7, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Similar to the AT&SF stone and brick arches in Leavenworth County Kansas.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Luke

FWIW the only pictures I can find of the Atchafalaya Basin Phoenix truss are all from the same bank, and there could have been Pratts as part of the approach on the opposing bank.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Something is amiss here. The bridge shown is comprised of several Pratt trusses while the link for the previous location shows a series of Whipple spans.

Posted April 6, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This nationally significant historic bridge is now on the verge of collapse, a condition that has developed this year as the result of recent floods. Scour has undercut a concrete foundation on which the tower rests, and one of the towers has dropped enough that the deck now has a significant sag to one side. One of the supporting bents under the towers has also snapped. The county is now pursuing DEMOLITION of this NATIONALLY SIGNIFICANT historic bridge on the claim that when it collapses it will destroy the modern bridge next to it. The county further claims it does not have the needed money to non-destructively dismantle the bridge and place it into storage. So, in short, unless a source of funding can be found to dismantle and put the bridge in storage or perhaps repair it in place, this bridge is otherwise in imminent doom, whether by collapse of demolition. The events that caused the recent collapse had not taken place when I visited the bridge last year for a full photo-documentation of this fascinating bridge. https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=t...

Posted April 5, 2020, by Luke

Melissa, if you would be so awesome as to grab pics from https://www.newspapers.com/image/53302177/?terms=%22New%2BBr...

Posted April 5, 2020, by Luke

Heads up Geoff, imagery is actually copyrighted. I'm trying to find a pic on Newspapers.com Melissa can grab.

Posted April 5, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Looking at the street view of the underside, I don't see that the stringers are concrete encased.

Posted April 3, 2020, by Luke
Posted April 3, 2020, by Luke

Unfortunately I've yet to find an image of the bridge, but https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/10460384/ shows that the bridge was closed due to a failing pier.

HistoricAerials has amazing aerial views of the long-lost truss.

Posted March 29, 2020, by Jason White (Chaserainer77 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Itís a beautiful walk through the railroad, especially during bluebonnet season. Great for taking pictures.

Posted March 14, 2020, by Eveline (Eee93 [at] aol [dot] com)

Work completed in 2019. Bridge is abandoned. But at least it is still there.

Posted March 10, 2020, by Tthedford (st_tthedford [at] msn [dot] com)

Just went across the new span on 3/8/2020, this bridge is open to westbound traffic, and the new bridge is open to east bound traffic.

Posted March 4, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted March 4, 2020, by Scott Wiley (fifty [dot] fathoms [at] yahoo [dot] com)

While photographing the Hope Memorial Bridge I located a second Bowstring that had been moved to the same property for storage.

Posted February 8, 2020, by Angela K (falpiqua [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Many fond memories of tubing under this view. A private citizen allowed us onto his property to capture this image.

https://wischt.com/art2016-2020/GRT.htm

Posted February 8, 2020, by Angela K (falpiqua [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge is famous as the home of the largest bat population in North America. On a warm evening just after sunset, 1.5 million bats fly out to get dinner.

https://wischt.com/art2016-2020/Congress.htm

Posted February 8, 2020, by Angela K (falpiqua [at] hotmail [dot] com)

My husband painted this bridge, I am posting it here for fans. Hope you like it.

https://wischt.com/art2016-2020/360B.htm

Posted February 7, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I did manage to find a date for the truss from some steel bridge records I acquired. Itís a standard span, but a rather long one. This design is seen elsewhere on the Santa Fe system. I do not have any records for the trestle, although it is safe to assume it was rebuilt every 50 years or so.

Posted February 7, 2020, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I sure hope they don't remove the truss. Seems awful wasteful to erect a trail setup with parking, etc, just to tear it down. From the news article, it sounds like the wooden trestle is what's hurting the water flow during floods, by collecting debris.

Posted February 5, 2020, by Luke

It makes more sense, considering all imagery posted by newspapers has shown the timber pile trestlework, not the truss itself.

Hopefully the section 106 review gives us more info on the history of the structure as a whole, but I agree that they're unlikely to remove the truss.

Posted February 5, 2020, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I don't think the through truss is going to be demolished. It has been converted to a trail, and appears to be planned to be left in place.

https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/dart-agrees-to-give-bridge...

Posted February 4, 2020, by Don Morrison

There does appear to be a warren truss structure nearby @

31.753026, -96.488174.

It was not there when the bridge was in place.

The ruler tool in Google Earth indicates that it has length and width dimensions that are comparable to those of the missing bridge.

Posted February 4, 2020, by Scott Wiley (fifty [dot] fathoms [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Unless the bridge is out of view on the old alignment, things don't look so good.

Posted February 3, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I was thinking the same thing Luke. 1890's Warren ponies are rare birds to boot.

Posted February 3, 2020, by Luke
Posted February 3, 2020, by Luke

The article claims 1890, but if you look at images of the bridge, such as https://twoworldstreasures.com/10-surprising-things-to-see-a..., it matches ca 1910 trusses like http://bridgehunter.com/tx/ellis/mt-zion-road/ more than an 1890s structure.

Posted February 1, 2020, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was about to mention that this bridge was an interesting pinned and riveted hybrid but I noticed that Anthony had already discussed that. This is one of those bridges that gets very interesting when you start looking at fine details.

Posted February 1, 2020, by Scott Wiley (bellstar120 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like a new cement bridge is in place.

Posted January 30, 2020, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

There is a second similar bridge just to the south on this same property at 33.642329, -97.095273. It is a bit harder to spot because of the trees.

Lake Ray Roberts, about 15 miles to the south, was under construction from 1982 to 1987. There are a good number of similar bridges that were removed from the lake area and are now in parks and on private property throughout several north Texas counties.

Posted January 30, 2020, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Lake Ray Roberts, about 25 miles to the southeast, was under construction from 1982 to 1987. There are a good number of similar bridges that were removed from the lake area and are now in parks and on private property throughout several north Texas counties.

Posted January 29, 2020, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

Photos from a 12/2019 visit to the park. The City of Muenster was kind enough to respond to my inquiry about the bridge's background, but unfortunately, even they don't know much in terms of its history, but they indicated that the bridge had been here for about thirty years.

Posted January 28, 2020, by Chris ďTulipĒ Revill (lonestaroverland [at] gmail [dot] com)

On private land.

Posted January 28, 2020, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I agree, this is far better than the fate of so many pony trusses. If at some future date it is decided to place it in a better location and configuration, much of the original will still exist for people to enjoy.

This is sort of like having elephants in a zoo; inappropriate, but possibly the first exposure for some people, which may lead to a greater appreciation of those "in the wild".

Kudos to someone for not scrapping it.

Posted January 27, 2020, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This should be called the OMG WTF bridge...

Posted January 27, 2020, by Luke

Unrelated to the bridge/for Mike, though, since he'll probably enjoy the bassline: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv4wf7bzfFE&feature=youtu.be...

Posted January 27, 2020, by Luke

2019 was given by the EXIF data, so I didn't bother to change it.

And I'll add the Faux Covered Bridge category, just to be cheeky.

And while it's functionality as a bridge is now lost, considering it sat since around 2009, this use is better than totally being scrapped IMO.