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Posted August 14, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Amanda Joy Mata. this may be bridge in your photo

Posted August 6, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Thank you for your work

Posted August 5, 2018, by Rene Gomez (rangerfan62 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hello.

I am the guy who assisted in getting the Newcastle Bridge listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Posted July 30, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The history of relocation is a little confusing to me here. All I know is per HAER, this bridge was moved to Travis County, and I found a bridge in Satellite imagery that appears to match the location described by HAER.

Unfortunately it appears to be behind a gated community or something. http://bridgehunter.com/tx/travis/bh82418/

Posted July 28, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Some of the original brick deck was reused on the bridge and nearby.

https://yourblvd.com/blog/revisit/rediscovering-yale-st-brid...

Posted July 28, 2018, by James Baughn (webmaster [at] bridgehunter [dot] com)
Posted July 28, 2018, by Enginerd (rjarrechea [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been demolished and replaced. Looks identical though

Posted July 25, 2018, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

Looking good in the summer of 2018!

Posted July 24, 2018, by Luke
Posted July 24, 2018, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The approximate coordinates of the NTTC bridge over the original Mountain Creek channel are: 32.746831, -96.926902. Road construction and flooding has resulted in the formation of relief channels in the area.

From Dallas the NTTC ran along the median of Jefferson Blvd to the western city limits. After the NTTC ceased operations Jefferson Blvd was extended westward along the abandoned NTTC right of way to the city of Grand Prairie. The dump through the bottoms was about 20 feet high. The postcard view may be this location.

The 1942 newspaper photo is of the Jefferson Blvd bridge which was built to replace the NTTC bridge. Best guess was originally a steel truss or girder but I do not have a photo or details.

Posted July 24, 2018, by Luke

M.C., do you know the GPS coords for the actual bridge over Mountain Creek?

Posted July 24, 2018, by Luke

Apparently this bridge is going to become a Texas landmark, albeit with the unfortunate misnomer of being named for a stream well to the west that was crossed by a truss, according to http://phorum.dallashistory.org/read.php?2,92080,92088

Posted July 24, 2018, by Jimmy Walters

Yes, the bridge in those pictures is near 32.715912,-96.881384 on Google maps

Posted July 24, 2018, by Luke

M.C., it's a DART/BNSF (Ex-ATSF/GCSF) line to the south

Posted July 24, 2018, by M C Toyer

This bridge is not the same as the listed bridge which is a concrete arch over Coombs Creek

Yours is a steel stringer on timber bents over a road or walking trail. Do you have the location of the one you photo'd? Is it an auto bridge or the abandoned railroad spur?

Posted July 23, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

Here are recent photos of the Coombs Creek Bridge taken in 2018.

Posted July 22, 2018, by Michael Horne (mdhorne [at] suddenlink [dot] net)

This was not a railroad bridge. The only railroad into Paint Rock TX was a line from Miles TX which crossed the river some distance west of here. The old pilings for the RR crossing are at (Google Map) coordinates 31.517182, -99.944371. The bridge supports shown in the article are likely from the old US 83 highway bridge; both it and the railroad crossing were washed out in a major flood in 1936.

Posted July 5, 2018, by Michael Traugott Jr (mikejr [at] traugottinc [dot] com)

The bridge has been demolished. They are in the process of building a new bridge.

Posted July 3, 2018, by kevin acosta (kcas2s [at] yahoo [dot] com)

high definition photo of this bridge, fully restored, is available on Canadian River page of Wikipedia. Someone more familiar with this site can probably upload, be sure to give credit of this pic to photographer Bill Hathorn: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_River#/media/File:Woo...

Posted June 21, 2018, by Brad Smith (gaberdine [at] hotmail [dot] com)
Posted June 19, 2018, by Sharon Thompson (km5gv [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

New bridge being constructed just east of this bridge

Posted June 19, 2018, by Sharon Thompson (km5gv [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

Sad to say, we visited this bridge in May of 2018 and its days are numbered. A replacement bridge is being constructed immediately to the east, and this bridge will be removed. It is not known whether it will be eligible for "adoption" and removal to another location.

Posted June 11, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The Historic Bridge Foundation stated that the bridge came from County Road 469 over Cottonwood Creek in Hillsboro County. That might refer to this bridge: http://bridgehunter.com/tx/hill/91100AA0482001/

Posted June 11, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The Historic Bridge Foundation provided information indicating that this bridge was relocated to this location ca. 2005.

Posted June 5, 2018, by Anonymous

Historic, considering it was bypassed in 1950

Posted June 5, 2018, by Royce and Bobette Haley (roycehaley111 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

? Significance?

Posted June 3, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I visited this bridge on 5-25-18. It is currently closed to vehicular traffic and only open to pedestrians.

Posted May 30, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

NBI lists this as Bennett St, but it's actually Old Falls Rd

Posted May 27, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks to me like this bridge replaced a previous girder bridge, probably in the past decade

Posted May 11, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It's nice to see that the campground is making use of it, thus helping with preservation.

Posted May 11, 2018, by Walter Poston (we [dot] poston [at] gmail [dot] com)

That helps, a lot. Thanks.

Posted May 10, 2018, by Art S (asuckeweyru [at] knite [dot] com)

Walter,

No need to apologize. Without your pictures we'd have nothing to discuss.

The thickness of the members usually has more to do with how much load the bridge is designed to carry. A Whipple is also known as a double intersection Pratt. This simply means the tension members (the really thin pieces) diagonally cross two panels. On a Pratt, these diagonal tension members simply cross one panel (they don't pass a vertical element).

In your pictures, you can see that the thin diagonal pieces run from one panel point (joint) diagonally to the next.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 10, 2018, by Walter Poston (we [dot] poston [at] gmail [dot] com)

Art, I'm sorry, I'm not very knowledgeable in bridges. I found this link and went by the pictures:

http://ftp.dot.state.tx.us/pub/txdot-info/env/historic-bridg...

By this document I figured it might be Whipple because, according to the pictures, the framing is thinner than on the Pratt.

Posted May 9, 2018, by Todd Greenberg (tgreenberg [at] libertyhill [dot] txed [dot] net)

Is this the bridge that is lying in a field near Wheeler Branch Lake? 32.26646, -97.76941

Posted May 8, 2018, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Walter - If you compare the maps cited in an earlier comment you can see that a good part of the old road alignment is still discernable and in use. It ran basically parallel on the east side of the creek north of the bridge and along the west side of the creek south of the bridge.

Posted May 8, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Walter,

Your pictures seem to show a five panel Pratt truss. I'd guess it's a little later - 1900 - 1915 would be my thought.

Great pics BTW.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 8, 2018, by Walter Poston (we [dot] poston [at] gmail [dot] com)

It appears to be a Whipple through truss. My limited research suggests it was built between 1860 and 1890. It's hard to imagine that it was once part of FM 973 since it runs perpendicular to the current highway route.

Posted May 4, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This crossing is on the map in 1904 and remains in 1950. The new alignment shows on the next map, dated 1984.

Looking at the NBI listings for the replacement bridge on the new alignment, a slab was built in 1950 and it was replaced in 2002 with the present bridge.

This bridge may not have closed immediately after it was bypassed but it may not have remained in use for long.

Posted May 4, 2018, by Walter Poston (we [dot] poston [at] gmail [dot] com)

I am staying at the RV park located just south of this bridge. My daughter and I came upon it as we were exploring the park. All that remains is the metal framing. The RV park has built a wooden "fishing dock/observation area" using the west side of the bridge. I couldn't find a road for the bridge which seemed odd to me and is what made me curious enough to research it's history and why the bridge is there. I'm guessing, at one time an old dirt or county road was there.

Posted April 23, 2018, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Needs paint as protection so that it isn't mistaken for a bridge that needs replacing.

Posted April 22, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

Photos taken April 2018

Posted April 22, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

Photos taken April 2018.

Posted April 22, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice Shots, Thanks for sharing.

Posted April 22, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

Photos taken April 2018

Posted April 22, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

Photos taken April 2018

Posted April 22, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

Photos taken April 2018.

Posted April 22, 2018, by Jonnie England (jonnieengland [at] att [dot] net)

I took this photo of the bridge on Apri1 8, 2018.

Posted April 9, 2018, by Bennie Dodd (bennie [dot] dodd [at] gmail [dot] com)

no access to public but can be seen from old entrance.

Posted April 7, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Unusual railing design.

Posted April 4, 2018, by Anonymous

Hello Doug

I used a 300mm lens, from 1st street, west of the bridge and the pedestrian bridge east of the bridge. However you can get much closer to the bridge, including the portals.

Royce

Posted April 3, 2018, by Doug (dougohlemeier [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi. I'm going to be in this area soon and want to photograph Amtrak crossing this bridge.

Of the photos taken from the east side of the RR bridge, what type of zoom lens did you use?

I have a 200 mm and am wondering if that would bring the bridge close enough from the 1st Street bridge.

Thanks for your help

Posted March 28, 2018, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Needed: Good home for historic Central Texas bridge

http://www.kwtx.com/content/news/Needed--Good-home-for-histo...

Posted March 24, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I'm thinking the pin connected trusses on this span are more of an 1890s design, not 1917. Thoughts?

Posted March 19, 2018, by Luke

It's a standardized bridge design, so the image is more than likely of one in Kearnes county.

Posted March 19, 2018, by Lori Shuler (lorishuler [at] live [dot] com)

I have attached a picture taken of a bridge in Texas during a flood in early 1947 or late 1946. The picture was developed in Feb 1947. I had always thought that this bridge was somewhere in Karnes County (possibly over the San Antonio River). But after viewing pictures of the Guadalupe River Bridge, I'm wondering if this is a picture of that bridge instead. Any thoughts? Thanks, Lori

Posted March 12, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Eligibility report attached.

Posted March 12, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Being retired, replaced and 'monumented' meaning the deck and approaches removed and the remains stabilized:

https://www.news-journal.com/news/state/bosque-county-histor...

Posted March 11, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Out of the dirt. Definitely caused damage being in the dirt.

Posted March 9, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This lift starts soon.

Posted March 3, 2018, by Jesse Sanchez (JSanchez [dot] bels [at] gmail [dot] com)

When was bridge built/erected?

Posted February 27, 2018, by Margot

It was definitely a cool bridge, as is the other one. Thanks for the info.

Posted February 27, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes, a variant of the Turner... the opinion of engineers was that it was not a "true" Turner truss, but it was a polygonal Warren truss with Turner-like characteristics. Either way, an unusual design.

Posted February 27, 2018, by Margot

So I guess this might have been another of that Turner style?

Posted February 27, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The resemblance is striking! Didn't realize that company built more than one bridge of this unusual design.

Posted February 27, 2018, by Margot

Hmm... This looks a lot like the Meridian Street bridge that got put in storage in Washington.

Posted February 8, 2018, by M Cox (trock859[at]yahoo[dot]com)

I would like to have one or two of those bricks.

Posted January 20, 2018, by Anonymous

It got replaced the other day

Posted January 12, 2018, by Luke

It's a Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad trestle.

Posted January 12, 2018, by Julia Bell (flyfshrgrl [at] gmail [dot] com)

What is the bridge that is farther east of the TE Culvert? Is that bridge also a Texas Electric bridge or is that a railroad bridge?

Posted January 10, 2018, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This is the extant concrete south abutment for the Texas Electric Railway.

There are other extant cut limestone abutments on the railroad.

Posted January 10, 2018, by Luke

The old through truss looks like the typical Phoenix-built Pratts the SP loved to use.

Posted January 10, 2018, by M C Toyer (mctoyer [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The railroad was constructed ca 1872-1873 for the Houston and Texas Central to connect Dallas with the MKT at Red River. I suspect the 1914 bridge was built on the original stone abutments when the line was upgraded.

Right next to this bridge the Texas Electric Railway crossed the creek on a pony truss on concrete abutments built about 1908. The Interurban bridge was removed when operations ceased about 1945.

This ca 1910 postcard view is facing south.

Posted January 10, 2018, by Anonymous

More than likely the latter. Railroads reused substructures all the time.

Posted January 10, 2018, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

It seems odd to have stone abutments and/or piers on a bridge of 1914. Cement had been standard for at least a decade.

Two ideas. This bridge could have been moved from another location and placed on existing stone work or this bridge could be a replacement for another earlier one on this site.

Posted January 10, 2018, by Julia Bell (flyfshrgrl [at] gmail [dot] com)

TxDOT and the City of Waxahachie are planning an expansion on Business US 77. This bridge is slated to be destroyed and new, wider (and uglier) one is to replace it.

Latest article on the issue. I did not get to attend this meeting.

http://www.waxahachietx.com/news/20170726/waxahachie-city-co...

Posted January 9, 2018, by Chris (ninerssuk [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thank you for posting this information for all to find! I went to this bridge today looking for history and was amazed at the limestone at the base and the size of the blocks. Not knowing anything about the bridge then, it is nice to now know some of its history thanks to this article. Thanks again!

Posted December 31, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Appears the pages have been merged

Posted December 30, 2017, by Luke
Posted December 17, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

A big thank you to Spicer Sigman for providing photos and for the tremendous effort in saving this beauty. The fact that it was hot riveted during its restoration goes well beyond what we see in most restorations.

Hats off to you sir!

Posted December 17, 2017, by Spicer Sigman (spicersigman [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I moved this bridge from the Hondo Creek to our ranch in 2003. The county was going to demolition it and I couldn't bare to see it wasted. It is a lenticular truss, so we hired Dodson House Moving and Alamo Crane to pick the bridge up on both ends at the same time. We then roaded the bridge to the ranch and placed it on awaiting concrete abutments. We spent the next year or so removing the cancerous lattice work and replacing it with newly fabricated steel. The entire bridge was hot-riveted, so it took a while to return it to its original form.

After sandblasting and repainting the entire bridge with a primer and two part epoxy, we installed new wood flooring as it was originally intended and drive across it daily. I will upload pictures soon.

Posted November 29, 2017, by because you asked
Posted November 28, 2017, by Michael Cromarty (m_cromarty [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Who was the Causeway named for?

Thanks,

MC

Posted November 18, 2017, by Anonymous
Posted November 10, 2017, by Wade Pitcher (wpitcher1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

November 2017

Posted November 10, 2017, by Wade Pitcher (wpitcher1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Seawillow Bridge

Posted October 5, 2017, by Mark Reeder (reedermh [at] verizon [dot] net)

The new bridge has been built and it appears the old one has been demolished. I crossed it recently and I saw no signs of an older bridge.

Posted September 27, 2017, by Bryan Jackson (bryan [at] ebryans [dot] com)

As I continue to travel around and celebrate 50 years on motorcycles with the Doug Domokos Tribute Tour, I am amazed with the beauty of our freedom. Doug always reminded us of that in his stunt shows as he was boldly patriotic. I am honored to continue giving tribute to him and I pray that everyone that it reaches would experience the true value of our freedom here in the USA, but more so a freedom anywhere in the world to have a genuine and real relationship with our creator - Jesus Christ.

Full article on YouTube at, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPiBnRCOe8M

Follow me, Bryan Jackson, as I travel the nation doing ministry, racing, and stunting at www.VerticalAdrenaline.com, which contains links to all social media platforms, schedules and promotional & booking materials.

About the photo/video shoot :

I had the opportunity to spend a little time at this beautiful nostalgic bridge in Mullin Texas in late September 2017. Even though I have performed on many bridges, I was a bit nervous on this one due to the fact that it moves, itís narrow, and it doesnít have railing. Itís supposedly the last one-way traffic suspension bridge in the state - that is still open to traffic. The Regency Bridge has been the opening footage of the Texas Country Reporter for some 20 years, itís in the National Register of Historic Places, itís the number one tourist attraction in San Saba and Mills counties. On top of all that growing stardom, a restoration of the bridge in 1999 brought out then Texas Governor George W. Bush in a dedication ceremony that attracted more than two thousand people to the remote location, including reporters from CNN, CBS, ABC, NBC, and a host of state and local media (most of whom were following Bush everywhere in those days in anticipation of his run for the presidency). This crossing of the Colorado River was built in 1939 to reopen an important agricultural route and to link San Saba and Brownwood. Itís 400ft with 340ft spanning tower to tower.

Posted September 27, 2017, by Bryan Jackson (bryan [at] ebryans [dot] com)

As I continue to travel around and celebrate 50 years on motorcycles with the Doug Domokos Tribute Tour, I am amazed with the beauty of our freedom. Doug always reminded us of that in his stunt shows as he was boldly patriotic. I am honored to continue giving tribute to him and I pray that everyone that it reaches would experience the true value of our freedom here in the USA, but more so a freedom anywhere in the world to have a genuine and real relationship with our creator - Jesus Christ.

Full video at, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPiBnRCOe8M

Follow me, Bryan Jackson, as I travel the nation doing ministry, racing, and stunting at www.VerticalAdrenaline.com, which contains links to all social media platforms, schedules and promotional & booking materials.

About the photo/video shoot :

I had the opportunity to spend a little time at this beautiful nostalgic bridge in Mullin Texas in late September 2017. Even though I have performed on many bridges, I was a bit nervous on this one due to the fact that it moves, itís narrow, and it doesnít have railing. Itís supposedly the last one-way traffic suspension bridge in the state - that is still open to traffic. The Regency Bridge has been the opening footage of the Texas Country Reporter for some 20 years, itís in the National Register of Historic Places, itís the number one tourist attraction in San Saba and Mills counties. On top of all that growing stardom, a restoration of the bridge in 1999 brought out then Texas Governor George W. Bush in a dedication ceremony that attracted more than two thousand people to the remote location, including reporters from CNN, CBS, ABC, NBC, and a host of state and local media (most of whom were following Bush everywhere in those days in anticipation of his run for the presidency). This crossing of the Colorado River was built in 1939 to reopen an important agricultural route and to link San Saba and Brownwood. Itís 400ft with 340ft spanning tower to tower.

Posted September 17, 2017, by John Marvig

Judging by the design, I would say approximately 1900 is a good bet. This design was a standardized Santa Fe truss.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Thom (twj [at] thewayfarersjournal [dot] com)

When was this train truss bridge built.

Posted September 13, 2017, by Bryan Jackson (bryan [at] ebryans [dot] com)

Itís Wheelie Wednesday Ė September 13, 2017

I had the opportunity to spend a little time at this beautiful nostalgic bridge over the Colorado River in Coleman County. Itís known as the Waldrip Bridge, due to it being close to Waldrip Texas, population 15. The bridge has an incredible story to go along with its incredible beauty. Itís a 698ft through-truss-bridge featuring a 170ft main span using a steel-and-wooden-deck. It underwent numerous obstacles getting built as the original contract for construction was awarded in 1894. After a couple of floods, one reaching 65 feet above normal levels, the bridge was finally opened in September of 1911. The bridge closed a few years ago for restoration and renovation and opened back up for traffic in September 2011.

Thank you for tagging along. As I continue to travel around and celebrate 50 years on motorcycles with the Doug Domokos Tribute, I am so fascinated with creation - - - it screams of the creator God Himself. I am in awe that He continues to enable me to go and do what I do and see hearts and souls changed for the Glory to God.

Many more beautiful things to come.

Special thanks to my wife Tina Jackson for capturing these memorable moments through the lens, Dwayne Dove for finding this little gem and sharing it with me, and Dusty Messenger of Fry'D Rice Cycles in Olden Texas for keeping all these wheelie units going. You dream it Ė He can build it.

Full photo shoot online at https://www.facebook.com/bryan.jackson.186/media_set?set=a.1...

Posted September 3, 2017, by Bryan Jackson (bryan [at] ebryans [dot] com)

I had the opportunity to spend a little time at this beautiful nostalgic bridge in Burkett, Texas in September of 2017. The Through-Truss-Bridge was built in 1922 and is 755ft long. It has a special place in Jackson history for a number of reasons, including my grandfather Terrill Jackson doing trick riding under the bridge in 1929 Ė shown in album. In addition, the town Burkett was formed by my grandmotherís family in 1886 and carried the name of postmaster William Burkett. Her name was Henrietta ďRettaĒ Burkett Jackson and she was quite the motorcycle enthusiasts as well, starting her riding career in the 1920ís Ė also shown in album. In thriving 1940 times, the town enjoyed about 200 settlers but declined over the years to currently around 30, just enough to still have that US Post Office once overseen by Mr Burkett himself.

As I continue to travel around and celebrate 50 years on motorcycles with the Doug Domokos Tribute Tour, I am fascinated with all that I get to see and do - and more so the talent that God has empowered me with to share with others. I hope you enjoy - and thereís more great things to come on the horizon, including a shoot at the infamous Waldrip Bridge in Coleman County. It has an amazing story in itself that Iíll be sharing with the shoot.

Special thanks to my wife Tina Jackson for capturing these memorable moments through the lens.

Link to the full photo shoot gallery

https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipMoOcdCrLYnEyJh_kPv4clX...

Posted September 2, 2017, by Kevin Collins (collinsmed514 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

How to find out removal and transport costs

Posted September 2, 2017, by Kevin (collinsmed514 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What are the dimensions and where is the bridge now?

Posted August 1, 2017, by Donna Botts (donnabotts [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I forgot to add, I've always heard it called Steinman Bridge. My Grandma moved to Electra by wagon in 1910, and they lived near Steinman Bridge.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Steve Quarrella (fishpope [at] iname [dot] com)

This bridge is now spending its retirement in front of Denton County Southwest Courthouse at 6200 Canyon Falls Dr, Roanoke, TX, in the vicinity of Argyle and Flower Mound. N 33į 04.325 W 097į 12.214

Posted July 24, 2017, by Waco Tribune-Herald (wemmons [at] wacotrib [dot] com)

We ran a piece with nice photos this weekend on the bridge: http://www.wacotrib.com/news/roads/a-bridge-too-close-a-hist...

Work began this month on a modern steel-and-concrete bridge about 10 feet away that will soon replace the last functioning Whipple truss bridge in Texas.

Posted July 18, 2017, by Anonymous

I was hoping there would be more of an update. But from looking at Bing maps where the images they have are in the winter (little brush covering the area), it appears the bridge is on the South Side of Chamber's Creek. Removed and set aside to rot.

Still a cool find if anyone can find the time to go there and get pictures! Very Interesting!!

Posted July 16, 2017, by Christopher Zurek (zurekc [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is not abandoned and is now owned and used by the BNSF to service the Blue Bell ice cream factory.

Posted July 15, 2017, by David Cathey (david [dot] cathey59 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was reopened later the same year it closed after the flood washed out the approach.

http://www.kxii.com/home/headlines/Highway-78-reopened--3205...