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Old FM1093 Brazos River Bridge

Photos 

Looking west

Photo taken by Patrick Feller

License: Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY)

View this photo on Flickr

BH Photo #289204

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Bridge over Brazos River on an old alignment of FM1093
Location
Austin County, Texas, and Fort Bend County, Texas
Status
Replaced by a new bridge upstream
History
Built ca. 1890; Converted 1922; Damaged when a log jam took out the western piers around 1958; Closed 1960 when it was discovered the middle pier was sinking; Replaced on a new alignment 1965
Railroad
- San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railway (SA&AP)
Design
2 112' through trusses
Also called
SA&AP - Brazos River Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+29.67080, -96.02059   (decimal degrees)
29°40'15" N, 96°01'14" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
14/788367/3286021 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Wallis
Inventory number
BH 52924 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • April 3, 2020: New photo from Melissa Brand-Welch
  • January 9, 2019: Updated by Luke: Added info
  • July 25, 2014: Photo imported by Patrick Feller
  • July 22, 2014: Updated by Luke: Added categories "San Antonio & Aransas Pass Railway", "Rail-to-road"
  • August 9, 2012: Updated by Daniel Hopkins: Added category "Railroad"
  • July 14, 2012: Added by Luke Harden

Related Bridges 

Sources 

Comments 

Old FM1093 Brazos River Bridge
Posted April 3, 2020, by Luke

Unfortunately I've yet to find an image of the bridge, but https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/10460384/ shows that the bridge was closed due to a failing pier.

HistoricAerials has amazing aerial views of the long-lost truss.

Old FM1093 Brazos River Bridge
Posted July 25, 2014, by Patrick Feller (nakrnsm [at] aol [dot] com)

There remains compelling evidence for a railroad origin for the bridge supports still visible. Among that evidence:

http://books.google.com/books?id=6H47AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA389&lpg=P...

While the structure of the riveted piers might support the argument for a bridge preceding the FM road, concrete rubble near the southwest bank supports the argument for a road.

It wouldn't be the first time that a bridge (or at least its substructure) had served two purposes over time.