Rating:
5 votes

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge

Photos 

Photo taken by J.P.

Enlarge

BH Photo #149165

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Swing through truss bridge over Cumberland River on R.J. Corman Railroad/Memphis Line at Clarksville
Location
Clarksville, Montgomery County, Tennessee
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1891 by the Pencoyd Bridge & Construction Co.
Builder
- Pencoyd Bridge & Construction Co. of Pencoyd, Pennsylvania
Railroads
- Louisville & Nashville Railroad (L&N; LN)
- Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway (NC&StL)
- R.J. Corman Railroad (RJCN; RJCR; RJCC; RJCL; RJCM; RJCP; RJCK; RJNX; RJCV)
Design
Main span: Swing pin-connected through truss
Approaches: Pair of pin-connected, 8-panel Camelback through trusses
Also called
NKP - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
R J Corman - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
L&N - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+36.52244, -87.36480   (decimal degrees)
36°31'21" N, 87°21'53" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/467339/4041958 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Clarksville
Inventory number
BH 43622 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • August 20, 2018: New photos from Jack Schmidt
  • December 10, 2015: New Street View added by Douglas Butler
  • March 1, 2014: New photos from Jack Schmidt
  • January 10, 2011: New Street View added by Eddie Douthitt
  • January 2, 2010: Updated by Calvin Sneed: http://www.csx.com/
  • November 14, 2009: Added by J.P.

Sources 

  • J.P. - wildcatjon2000 [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Calvin Sneed - us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Eddie Douthitt - dalton1861 [at] yahoo [dot] com
  • Douglas Butler
  • Jack Schmidt - jjturtle [at] earthlink [dot] net

Comments 

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted November 9, 2018, by Cristy Hartsell (cristy [dot] hartsell [at] ymail [dot] com)

Is there a meaning behind the different colors and times they are displayed?

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted October 6, 2018, by Aaron (Aschmitt03 [at] gmail [dot] com)

How often is the bridge house manned?

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted September 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Brittany:

My suspicion is that the numbers indicate the clearance underneath the bridge. More specifically, they likely indicate the distance between the water and the bottom of the trusses.

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted September 1, 2017, by Brittany Svoboda (countrygirlscrapper [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Why do the water gauge numbers go from top to bottom instead of bottom to top? I assumed if the 0 was at the bottom it would show how high the water is.

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted August 22, 2017, by Brent McCoy (brentmccoycat [at] yahoo [dot] com)

how much railroad traffic travels over the bridge?

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted August 11, 2017, by Kenton dickerso (Kentondi [at] comcast [dot] net)

This bridge was built by the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railway; not the Nickel Plate.

RJCM - Cumberland River Swing Bridge
Posted December 2, 2016, by Echo Anderson (Echo Anderson [at] Historic bridges [dot] org)

I live in town and I have seen this bridge many times. Once a barge hit it, causing one of the pillars to become encased in concrete and preserved. It is a beautiful bridge and is one of the lucky few that survived the flood of 2010. This is one tough bridge. Oh, and you're right, those approaches are insane! They are so freakin long it's weird but true!

L & N Railroad Swing Bridge
Posted January 10, 2011, by Greg Biggs (Biggsg [at] charter [dot] net)

Thanks for showing this bridge. The stone piers were built in 1859-1860 for the original wooden swing bridge built to cross the Cumberland River for the Memphis, Clarksville & Louisville RR. The steel bridge was built in the early 20th Century I believe.

A few years ago a barge did a hit and run on one of the original piers and it was rebuilt - you show it in your picture.

L & N Railroad Swing Bridge
Posted July 14, 2010, by Calvin Sneed (us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

J.P., if you want to see a wooden trestle that'll knock your socks off, see the Centerville Railroad Bridge in Hickman County.

That one is almost as long, as it is tall!

L & N Railroad Swing Bridge
Posted November 16, 2009, by J.P.

thanks for the correction on that.

L & N Railroad Swing Bridge
Posted November 15, 2009, by Robert Thompson (rkt [dot] engineering [at] gmail [dot] com)

Do you mean the CUMBERLAND River? (I've made the same error myself...)