Recent Tennessee Comments

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Posted November 30, 2018, by Patrick Feller (nakrnsm [at] aol [dot] com)

Great photography of a spectacular bridge!

Posted November 18, 2018, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Isen't the "Description" section misleading as it obviously is referring to the bridge this one replaced? It does look as if the piers from the 1893 bridge were used in the current bridge with concrete extensions raising their height.

Posted November 17, 2018, by Bob Davis (bobdaviscfi [at] earthlink [dot] net)

I would like to give credit to Tony Skeen who provided the built date on a local history facebook page He says, "It was actually built in 1934. Dad was working for the L&N in the engineering department downtown when they did that."

Posted November 11, 2018, by Kristen and Ken

Loved our visit!

Posted November 11, 2018, by Kristen and Ken

Beautiful bridge!

Posted November 9, 2018, by Cristy Hartsell (cristy [dot] hartsell [at] ymail [dot] com)

Is there a meaning behind the different colors and times they are displayed?

Posted October 25, 2018, by Ed McCoy (enmreal [at] gmail [dot] com)

My dad was the lead ironworker foreman during construction of this bridge from May 1962 thru April 1963. Our family resided in Oneida during this time. I remember, as a eleven year old, flying across the top portion of the bridge in a skip pan (with my mother and younger brother)from a crane with my dad riding the headache ball on the crane. Oddly enough, I ended up spending the majority of my career with TVA Nuclear as a crane and rigging engineer. Really enjoyed your pictures.

Posted October 24, 2018, by Craig Williams (cwilly8 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Got a shot of this bridge today. Photo attached. For your use if you want to add it to the page.

Posted October 8, 2018, by Lynne Davis (lynnedavis865 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is being replaced and the road is closed, requiring a detour. Not certain when it will be completed.

Posted October 6, 2018, by Aaron (Aschmitt03 [at] gmail [dot] com)

How often is the bridge house manned?

Posted September 23, 2018, by Sandra Wisecup (sandywisecup [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is so exciting to find photos of this old RR trestle. My Grandmother use to walk across it on her way to and from school. Once while crossing a train came, she dropped through and held on. Other kids followed her example and survived that day.

Posted September 23, 2018, by Luke

Considering the other page is one entry for a handful of bridges, this entry could be made into an entry for one of them, the other for another, etc.

Posted September 23, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted September 18, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Thanks for Documenting Jack

Posted September 16, 2018, by Brianna Tarness (briannatarness82 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Current plans appear to be to replace this bridge with a “haunched girder bridge” that apparently will be “like the Sam Rayburn Bridge over the Clinch River”, which is also on I-40. However, as we saw with the Hulton Bridge in PA, and the Fort Stueben Bridge in WV/OH, even an “attractive” girder bridge or cable-stayed bridge, while better than an outright UCEB, still cannot replace the geometric beauty of an historic truss bridge.

Posted September 7, 2018, by Philip Walker (pcwalker [dot] tx [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge received damage. Photo from Feb 09 2018.

Posted September 3, 2018, by Matt Lohry

This actually appears to be a deck plate girder with timber approaches.

Posted September 3, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Timber OVER TEE Beam! Thanks for making the journey

Butler Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted August 27, 2018, by Philip Walker (pcwalker [dot] tx [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was demolished in 2013 I believe.

Posted August 27, 2018, by Chambers Williams (chambers [at] auto-writer [dot] com)

This bridge is on Mountain Road, not Taylor Chapel Road. I drove over it a few minutes ago. (8-27-18)

Posted August 13, 2018, by Nick Schmiedeler (nick [at] nickschmiedeler [dot] com)

Very cool, good find!!

Posted August 7, 2018, by David Kinser (dkinser1958 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This was never NC&STL railroad

Posted July 28, 2018, by Timothy and Joann Phillips (northforkcomputer [at] gmail [dot] com)

The good news is: Calvin Sneed did an excellent job documenting this noteworthy bridge. It's always a shame when such a treasure is demolished, but I'm thankful that Calvin took such great pictures.

The bad news is: I didn't discover Bridge Hunting until July of 2018 and missed seeing this bridge in real life.

Posted July 26, 2018, by Chambers Williams (chambers [at] auto-writer [dot] com)

I drive across this bridge frequently. I don't believe it's "closed to all traffic."

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Calvin,

Nice to see you back! I really enjoy your contributions and would love to see your photos of this structure. Regarding of the build date of the bridge, I suspect the pin connected spans date to the late 1890s or the early 1900s.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Calvin Sneed (us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

An update.. I hiked to this bridge in 2016 and spent four hours taking many pictures from underneath it. Later, I spent time on the adjacent Hickman-Lockhart while not impeding traffic and also photographed each railroad span several times. Never saw any police, although I'll admit to timing my photography to lulls in the traffic flow. I don't seek trouble while bridge-hunting and ordinarily will try to avoid it, however I won't let someone keep me from lawfully enjoying the passion of taking pictures of a beautiful bridge. Got great pictures in this case. But nonetheless, my defense would have stood, had I encountered any resistance.

Allen's Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted May 16, 2018, by Betty (bettyhjennings [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What year was Allen's Bridge destroyed by a flood? I think that Bird's Bridge was destroyed at the same time. I would appreciate ant information you can give me on this.

Posted April 24, 2018, by Matt Lohry

I can certainly say that I'm not surprised--TDOT should be renamed TennDOT, since it rhymes with PennDOT, and their level of care for their historic bridges are right on par with each other. They are on a crusade to destroy every last truss bridge in the state, and at the rate they're moving, it will be a very short time before they accomplish their goal. It's a good thing that Tennessee has plenty of natural beauty, otherwise there would be little reason to visit.

Posted April 6, 2018, by Arlette Pixley (arlettepixley [at] aol [dot] com)

Love this photo. Just what I'm looking for.

Posted March 9, 2018, by Timothy Boone (timothy_boone [at] ymail [dot] com)

The South support pier was toppled by a towboat. It has since been rebuilt but not of the same type as the original.

Posted February 20, 2018, by David S. (dscharen [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Here are two shots of the Emory River Bridge that were taken on my return from Spring City during the August 2017 solar eclipse. The first image is taken from the parallel N. Roane St. bridge. The second image was taken from the lumber company parking lot on the north side of the bridge.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/66708125@N03/39817341932/in/da...

Posted February 16, 2018, by Tracey Richardson (tracey [dot] richardson [at] sumnerschools [dot] org)

Thank you so much. This is a great website. Very very helpful when trying to help out our school bus drivers with locations they've never been to. Much appreciated.

Posted February 15, 2018, by Zachary S

Demolition should be nearly complete by now, was half removed back in November when I last went by - over the new bridge, for the first time. Was always a bit of a fun adventure to cross this one going to the mountains, and very frustrated it wasn't preserved as a walking bridge (there was quite a bit of support and a plan in the making) because of eleventh hour nonsense thrown in about its stability in case of a _10,000_ year flood. A small part might go toward building a bridge in a city park, but we'll see.

Posted January 7, 2018, by Gary (gary [dot] storts [at] gmail [dot] com)

Image of Bridge from east side

Posted January 7, 2018, by Gary (gary [dot] storts [at] gmail [dot] com)

image of the Double Bridge Road Bridge

Posted December 2, 2017, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Matt,I agree about PennDOT and the way they operate.Didn't know Tennessee was that bad.By the way,I live in Pa.

Posted December 1, 2017, by Matt Lohry

Given its treatment of its historic bridges, TDOT should change their name to TennDOT, since it sounds just like PennDOT!

Posted November 30, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted November 13, 2017, by Anonymous

I don't believe this bridge has a width of more than 69 miles. If it's true, this bridge's width is greater than the length of every north american bridge! Also, the description... "bridge on cars". Unless we're talking about a monster truck rally, that is just not possible.

Posted November 12, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Honestly Robert... The surprise for me would come if Tennessee decided to SAVE an historic truss bridge! :-(

Posted November 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Surprisingly, this bridge appears to be doomed:

https://www.tn.gov/tdot/news/50799

I have driven across it in previous years, but the road was closed when I was in the area a few days ago.

This bridge is, or perhaps was, located in a National Wildlife Refuge and was just downstream from a modern four lane concrete bridge that carries Interstate 40. I figured the Tennessee would preserve this one but apparently no such luck. It primarily carried local traffic and visitors to the Wildlife Refuge.

Posted October 24, 2017, by Cliff Darby (clif30 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

What a beautiful bridge!!

Posted October 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yep, I think that we have a misprint...

Posted October 5, 2017, by Oliver

..........That's only .1612 Smoot........

Posted October 5, 2017, by David (volcrano [at] gmail [dot] com)

This tunnel is listed as 0.9 feet long, which seems short.

Posted October 3, 2017, by Timothy Jones (Swamphawk12 [at] Yahoo [dot] com)

The plaque is located on the first pier about half way up the side. It is on the very first pier on the Warren County side of the Caney Fork River. This pier is on dry land and the brick work is excellent. It is excessable via Cotten's Marina, just off of old Hy. 70S (The Rock Island Road).

Posted September 24, 2017, by Dave (potiukd [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is the kind of bridge they should be building today instead of the ugly utilitarian structures that have taken their place.

Posted September 14, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I visited this bridge September 15th, 2017. Construction is well underway on the new bridge, though I don't anticipate completion until 2018

Posted September 12, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

The original bridge was built circa 1890

Posted September 6, 2017, by Bobby Hill (t55u687irt [at] gmail [dot] com)

boi you forgot the bridge type ima get an f in science project

Thomas Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted September 5, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Not only are the truss members buckling, but this bridge also has some severe section loss. I am afraid that this one is going to be fish habitat if nothing is done soon.

Thomas Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted September 4, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, this is a hidden gem! Hopefully Tennessee will preserve this one!

Thomas Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted September 4, 2017, by Timothy (timdaugherty1980 [at] gmail [dot] com)

How on earth did you get on the deck on this one?

I saw the wood was all rotted away! You are brave!

Posted September 2, 2017, by Keith Collier (Mkco11ier [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hello. Are you familiar with the history of the Hickmam-Lockhart Bridge? My grandmother, Jennie Mai Hickman Collier, told me years ago that the bridge was originally named for her brother who died in WW1. I understand a state senator Lockhart later pushed to have his name added. I don't know the full name of her brother. Thanks, Keith Collier

Posted September 1, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hi Brittany:

My suspicion is that the numbers indicate the clearance underneath the bridge. More specifically, they likely indicate the distance between the water and the bottom of the trusses.

Posted September 1, 2017, by Brittany Svoboda (countrygirlscrapper [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Why do the water gauge numbers go from top to bottom instead of bottom to top? I assumed if the 0 was at the bottom it would show how high the water is.

Posted August 22, 2017, by Brent McCoy (brentmccoycat [at] yahoo [dot] com)

how much railroad traffic travels over the bridge?

Posted August 11, 2017, by Kenton dickerso (Kentondi [at] comcast [dot] net)

This bridge was built by the Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railway; not the Nickel Plate.

Posted August 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The dedication sign shows the name for the US 70 bridge. When US 70 traffic was removed from this bridge the pedestrian bridge was designated the Bob Sheehan Memorial, keeping the Elmer Disspayne Sr designation for the bridge carrying the highway.

Posted August 10, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This drawbridge is kinda rare to see opening with no traffic lights and no gates. This drawbridge still operates.

Posted August 10, 2017, by Nathan Delaplaine (ndelaplaine [at] gmail [dot] com)

This drawbridge is kinda rare to see opening with no traffic lights and no gates. This drawbridge still operates.

Posted August 9, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

US 70 was commissioned in 1926, so this bridge probably never carried it.

Posted August 9, 2017, by Bryan Collins (ponyboy [at] usmvmc-tn2 [dot] org)

Went exploring yesterday...found the bridge but couldn't get down to it.... Noticed a homeless person's camp, announced myself and was invited into the campsite... explained what I was trying to figure out and the homeless guy (Danny) showed me the hidden trails to get to the bottom.... So much fun!

(Repaid his kindness with a case of water and some food stuffs)

O&W Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted August 7, 2017, by Donna Martin (truewest [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Great News! In November 2016 Scott County was able to get a grant to refurbish this bridge. In March 2017 the wood on the bridge was replaced to make it safe for vehicle, foot and equine travel once again. The bridge leads into Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area where camping, hiking, mountain biking and equine trails are available.

Donna Martin, Owner, OHP

True West Campground, Stables & Mercantile, LLC

Posted August 1, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Timothy,

Thanks for the photo of the plaque, as it illuminates association of this bridge with the company that famous engineer Albert Fink worked for... Where specifically is this plaque located on the bridge? One of the abutments?

Posted July 31, 2017, by Timothy Jones (DT1712 [at] Yahoo [dot] com)

It has been rumored that this bridge was raised to accommodate the rising waters of the Great falls lake. However, the bridge has never been raised in elevation. The Benchmark at Rock Island is 880 feet. The support piers were encased in concrete to protect the masonry brick work that the piers were originally constructed of. See photo.

Posted July 31, 2017, by Timothy Jones (DT1712 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge is a Warren deck style bridge approx. 450 feet long. It was built shortly after the Civil War, about 1870. It is suspect that it was built by the Memphis & Charleston Railroad, which is the same company that built the bridge at Rock Island, Tenn. in 1871-72, across the Caney Fork River. The Nashville, Chattanooga, & St. Louis bought the McMinnville & Manchester from the M&C in 1877 and completed the line from McMinnville to Sparta by 1884.

Posted July 28, 2017, by Timothy Jones (DT1712 [at] Yahoo [dot] com)

Rock Island, Tennessee is located in Warren Co. not in White County. The bridge was built between 1871 and 1872. It spans approximately 660 ft.in length.

Posted July 21, 2017, by Cheryl (Broylesville [at] gmail [dot] com)

Do you know if there was a bridge in this location prior to the one above or if the Glaze's Ford mentioned below is the same? In 1813 the townspeople petitioned the court of Washington County to allow a saw mill "tto be built on Little Limestone creek JUST below the waggon ford on said creek (which is the road leading from Jonesborough to Glaze's ford)." I know this is the Nolichucky but just wondered about the use of the term "Glaze's ford" in 1813. Thank you! Cheryl

Posted July 21, 2017, by Rose Secrest (rosesecrest [at] hughes [dot] net)

I just now read about Calvin Sneed and his new book, and, by golly, here he is!

I visited this yesterday, one of four I managed to find in Meigs County. Such beautiful creeks!

I can't wait to read his bridge book!

Posted June 29, 2017, by Luke
Posted June 29, 2017, by Jim Holloway (jimholloway2 [at] icloud [dot] com)

Dug up a photo from October, 1976. I was a year off in my last message. My brother John shot this photo of Southern 4501 pulling a fall colors excursion to Asheville. The train is eastbound. The second set of rails has already been removed at this time, but apparently not long before.

Posted June 29, 2017, by Jim Holloway (jimholloway2 [at] icloud [dot] com)

The photo caption stating that this bridge was built for double track but a second track was never built is incorrect. This line was double track from 1910 until probably the late 70s, when the second track was removed. There are photos of the new double track bridge online in a Railway and Locomotive Engineering journal from April, 1910. I personally stood at the east end of this double track bridge in 1975.

Posted June 29, 2017, by Jim Holloway (jimholloway2 [at] icloud [dot] com)

The photo caption stating that this bridge was built for double track but a second track was never built is incorrect. This line was double track from 1910 until probably the late 70s, when the second track was removed. There are photos of the new double track bridge online in a Railway and Locomotive Engineering journal from April, 1910. I personally stood at the east end of this double track bridge in 1975.

Posted June 7, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Rose new photos always appreciated!

Posted May 24, 2017, by Walter Aertker (waertker [at] aertker [dot] com)

Ellis Bridge and other bridges. How does one find out how to procure and use? I am in the market for an old bridge in middle Tn and it does not need to be wider than 12'.

Thank you

Posted April 25, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Looks like Waverly was full of T Beams, only one I could find looked pretty original. Know there is a little debate about how historic these are but FAST disappearing.

Posted April 18, 2017, by Calvin Sneed (us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Alex, the video gave me chills of the train crossing on the bridge, and the train horn is so nostalgic. Thanks for capturing and posting this part of Americana!

Unknown Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted April 17, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

There are no maps showing anything there other than an earlier alignment of the road that preceded the current US highway.

Unknown Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted April 17, 2017, by Jared M.

It could have possibly been an old alignment of the nearby railroad.

Posted April 4, 2017, by Debie Oeser Cox (debiec [at] gmail [dot] com)

There seems to repair work happening at the south support pier for the swing bridge. There is some sort of buoy in the river. A reader of my blog says the support pier has been removed. Anyone have information about the project?

Posted April 2, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well, depending on who you ask, this is either a sub-divided Warren truss, or a Baltimore truss. There has been a comment or fifty about this distinction on the forum over the years. Thanks for uploading the photo.

Posted April 2, 2017, by D. W. Adams (weetbixmarmite [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Here's a picture containing this bridge taken from the deck of the General Jackson showboat. I hope this helps identify the truss type.

Posted March 25, 2017, by Albert Pope (popealbert [at] bellsouth [dot] net)

This bridge used to lead to a parking lot for Alcoa workers at the South Plant. Alcoa has changed the parking situation for it's workers and torn down the approach to this bridge. The bridge actually crosses 2 railroads: NS and the Alcoa Terminal RR (ATRR). Several trains a day pass under it. There was a time when Alcoa had landscaping and lights on the bridge, it was an attractive setting.

Posted March 22, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you as always Mr. Baslee!

Posted March 22, 2017, by Calvin Sneed

This elegant bridge is no longer with us. Blown into the water on Monday, March 20, 2017. RIP.

Posted March 19, 2017, by Linda Smith (smithsrus [at] gmail [dot] com)

Aerial photos of Hannah Ward Bridge taken March 2017

Posted March 13, 2017, by Dan (1992sentrase [at] gmail [dot] com)

About a mile, give or take, down the CSX mainline is another wooden bridge on South Springview Road. You can see it from the Binfield Road railroad overpass. I do know of a wooden bridge built in the 1940's on East Harper Avenue in Maryville, Tennessee. It is over the Norfolk Southern right-of-way.

Posted February 28, 2017, by Don Morrison

It's categorized as both preserved and lost. Time to clean up the categories.

Posted February 28, 2017, by Timothy (timdaugherty1980 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I finally found this old gem!!! Any idea when it was built? I walked down the old road and saw it before my eyes! Was amazing!!

Posted February 10, 2017, by George Hollingsworth (geohollingsworth [at] msn [dot] com)

Glad you found it. In addition to the bridges built after the Smokies became a national park there a lot of smaller bridges deep inside the park. Most of the campgrounds in the park were originally lumber mill sites that were serviced by narrow-gage rail lines going back into the mountains. After the park was formed the rails were removed and hiking paths formed. Several of the old truss bridges remain and were converted for pedestrian use. Here are two N35.607323, W-083.332968 and N35.610552, W-083.254940. These are the coordinates of the Google Earth photos of the bridges. Enjoy.

Posted February 9, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

Got it.

Posted January 31, 2017, by Gerald Gabriel (drivewaydreams [at] gmail [dot] com)

I was at the Mount Olive bridge today and snapped a neat picture. Just wanted to share.

Posted January 7, 2017, by Mary Noel

We have done some research on the bridge - it's still in place (2017) but showing deterioration of the concrete deck.

The Bridge's name was changed by the County early in the 1900's to Smith Bridge (a Glaze daughter who lived near the bridge married a Smith). Originally bridge had a wood deck that was replaced by concrete in the 1960's. It was painted a bright silver when open - traces of paint still visible in protected corners. The bridge was decommissioned in the mid-1980's.

E.N. Matthews, one of the principal bridge engineers, ended up marrying a gal who lived in the brick foursquare adjacent to the bridge (our house) and lived the rest of his life here in Limestone, TN - building a farm about a mile up the road from the bridge.

Posted January 2, 2017, by Echo Anderson (Echo Anderson [at] Historic bridges [dot] org)

We'll be able to see the eclipse from this one!

Posted December 28, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge appears to have an NBI listing implying it is owned by the city (ie the public, taxpayers, etc). However site visit reveals numerous No Trespassing signs posted BEFORE the bridge. Maybe the road after the bridge is private, but it is not appropriate for anyone to post such signs if, as the NBI suggests, this bridge is owned, inspected, and maintained by a public agency using taxpayer dollars. The signs mislead visitors into believing that it is unlawful to visit this bridge, which is not true if its owned by a public agency.

Posted December 2, 2016, by Echo Anderson (Echo Anderson [at] Historic bridges [dot] org)

I live in town and I have seen this bridge many times. Once a barge hit it, causing one of the pillars to become encased in concrete and preserved. It is a beautiful bridge and is one of the lucky few that survived the flood of 2010. This is one tough bridge. Oh, and you're right, those approaches are insane! They are so freakin long it's weird but true!

Posted November 27, 2016, by Dennis G. Massey

Still standing today.

Frisco Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted November 17, 2016, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Rich,

Thanks for the background, so I gather the new approach will have a lesser grade... and also that the main spans are not to be replaced as part of this project?

Frisco Bridge (Tennessee)
Posted November 7, 2016, by Rich

BNSF did a major rebuild of the main spans of this bridge in the mid-2000s due to deterioration. The Arkansas approach to the channel crossing is the steepest grade on the main line between Memphis and Thayer, Mo. There were very prohibitive operating rules that governed speed and how much power the engineer could use along certain points of the bridge--in fact it was possible to stall out on the approach which required being pushed over. Because of the low speed limit, single track and being near Tennessee Yard, it became a major bottleneck for the railroad between Kansas City and Birmingham.