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Wickford Cove Bridge

Photos 

Wickford Cove Bridge

Photo taken by C Hanchey in August 2013

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)

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BH Photo #267295

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Rainbow arch bridge over Wickford Cove on US 1A in North Kingstown
Location
North Kingston, Washington County, Rhode Island
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1925; rehabilitated 1977
Design
Concrete through arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 80.1 ft.
Total length: 111.9 ft.
Deck width: 25.9 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 19.3 ft.
Recognition
Listed as a contributing resource to the Wickford Historic District
Also called
Clarence L. Hussey Memorial Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.56889, -71.45139   (decimal degrees)
41°34'08" N, 71°27'05" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
19/295609/4604814 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Wickford
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
13,636
Inventory numbers
RI 110 (Rhode Island bridge number)
BH 31980 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of October 2016)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 53.9 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • March 30, 2011: New Street View added by Frank Hicks

Sources 

Comments 

Wickford Cove Bridge
Posted December 9, 2018, by Dave Wrenn (wrenndavid [at] gmail [dot] com)

UPDATE INFO

PROVIDENCE JOURNAL

Hussey Bridge reopens in Wickford

Posted Nov 1, 2016 at 4:38 PM Updated Nov 1, 2016 at 4:38 PM

NORTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. (AP) — The historic Clarence Hussey Memorial Bridge has reopened to traffic in Wickford.

The Department of Transportation says that the 91-year-old bridge in North Kingstown’s Wickford village opened eight months ahead of schedule.

The bridge carries Route 1A over Wickford Cove. It was closed twice this year for repairs as part of a $3.2 million rehabilitation project.

The span was named for the state’s first bridge engineer, who died in 1925 after the bridge was completed.