Matt Lohry

About Me 

I have had an interest in historic bridges for as long as I can remember. Around my childhood home in St. Louis County, MN, historic truss bridges were as plentiful as one could imagine--now, there are only a few left, and I regret not photographing and documenting many of the structures that have been in existence and have disappeared over the past 21 years that I have been driving. Now, I try to get out and photo-document the bridges that are left in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Hennepin and Fillmore counties lead the way in historic bridge quantity in the state, but on the other hand, many counties in the state have no historically valuable bridges at all, which is quite sad.

In addition to bridges, I love classic cars, particularly cars from the late '60's to early '70's cars from the Big 3. I had a 1971 Chevrolet Impala convertible that I'd owned since 1996, but sold in 2012.

Recent Updates 

Yellow Medicine River Bridge (Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota)
Pratt pony truss bridge over Yellow Medicine River on CR 115
June 16, 2018: Updated by Matt Lohry: Bridge was removed in March 2013; no replacement was built.
Auburn Bridge (Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Milwaukee River on Private driveway
May 10, 2018: New photos
Lowry Avenue Bridge (Old) (Hennepin County, Minnesota)
Lost five-span through truss bridge over Mississippi River on Lowry Avenue (CR 153) in Minneapolis
May 2, 2018: New Street View added
Bee Creek Bridge (Chautauqua County, Kansas)
Pony truss bridge over Bee Creek on Minor Ee.0-10.1, 7.0 mi. north and 2.0 mi. east of Niotaze
April 12, 2018: Updated by Matt Lohry: Corrected location
Bee Creek Bridge (Chautauqua County, Kansas)
Pony truss bridge over Bee Creek on Minor Ee.0-10.1, 7.0 mi. north and 2.0 mi. east of Niotaze
April 12, 2018: Updated by Matt Lohry: Corrected location
Branch Chikaskia River Bridge (Sumner County, Kansas)
2-span Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over a branch of Chikaskia River, 1.7 mi. west of Argonia
April 11, 2018: Updated by Matt Lohry: Added truss type
B&M - Atlantic Mills Bridge (Essex County, Massachusetts)
Lost Warren through truss bridge over North Canal on Boston & Maine Railroad
April 9, 2018: Updated by Matt Lohry: Corrected location—this bridge was just east of Broadway over the canal, not at Amesbury.
I-694 Mississippi River Bridge (Anoka County, Minnesota)
Steel stringer bridge over Mississippi River on Interstate 694
February 23, 2018: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated to include Hennepin County; Corrected design—this is a steel stringer bridge
Frye Bridge (Beaver County, Pennsylvania)
Lost deck truss bridge over Mckinley Run on New York Avenue in Rochester
November 29, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated per forum post: this bridge no longer exists.
West Branch Sheepscot River Bridge (Lincoln County, Maine)
Lost girder bridge over West Branch Sheepscot River on Howe Road
November 4, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated status per forum post—Bridge has been removed.
Troy Bridge (Lincoln County, Montana)
Pin-connected 11-panel Parker through truss bridge over Kootenai River on CR 071 in Troy
October 24, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Added truss type
Tainter Creek Bridge (Private) (Crawford County, Wisconsin)
Warren pony truss with all verticals bridge over Tainter Creek on Private Driveway
October 6, 2017: New Street View added
Tainter Creek Bridge (Private) (Crawford County, Wisconsin)
Warren pony truss with all verticals bridge over Tainter Creek on Private Driveway
October 6, 2017: Added
Winneshiek Slough Bridge (Crawford County, Wisconsin)
Deck truss bridge over Winneshiek Slough and BNSF Railroad on WI 82
October 6, 2017: New Street View added
Muscoda Bascule Bridge (Grant County, Wisconsin)
Lost Pony/through plate girder bridge over Wisconsin River on State Highway 80
October 6, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Corrected adjoining county--this bridge crosses into Richland County, not Crawford County.
Mickley Avenue Overpass (Gaston County, North Carolina)
Lost tee beam bridge over Norfolk Southern Railway on Mickley Avenue
August 28, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: This bridge has been replaced.
Green River Bridge (Grant County, Wisconsin)
Pony truss bridge over Green River on WI 133
August 18, 2017: New Street View added
Cherrytree Run Bridge (Venango County, Pennsylvania)
Lost Pony truss bridge over Cherrytree Run on TR 587 (Harper Road)
June 26, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: GE shows new bridge here
Clark Fork Bridge (Sanders County, Montana)
Riveted 11-panel Parker through truss bridge over Clark Fork on CR 066
June 23, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated bridge type--this is a Parker through truss
Long Meadow Bridge (Hennepin County, Minnesota)
Through truss bridge over Long Meadow Lake on a pedestrian walkway in Bloomington
June 18, 2017: New photos
Apple River Bridge (St. Croix County, Wisconsin)
Deck truss bridge over Apple River on WI 35/WI 64 in Somerset
June 18, 2017: New photos
North Branch Root River MN 250 Bridge (Fillmore County, Minnesota)
Lost Through truss bridge over North Branch Root River on MN 250
May 22, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated status per forum post
Auburn Bridge (Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Milwaukee River on Private driveway
April 27, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated status--this bridge has collapsed, putting its future at risk.
Lost Bridge (Miami County, Indiana)
2-span riveted Pratt through truss bridge over Eel River on CR 100 East
April 19, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated truss design
BNSF - Vermillion River Bridge (Clay County, South Dakota)
Through Girder Bridge over Vermillion River on BNSF Railway
March 24, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated bridge type
Narrows Creek Bridge (Sauk County, Wisconsin)
Lost Truss bridge over Narrows Creek on WI 23/WI 154
February 10, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Corrected all info
Sloans Ferry Bridge (Gaston County, North Carolina)
Steel stringer bridge over Catawba River on U.S. Highways 29 & 74 (Wilkinson Boulevard)
January 31, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated basic information
Sloans Ferry Bridge (Gaston County, North Carolina)
Steel stringer bridge over Catawba River on U.S. Highways 29 & 74 (Wilkinson Boulevard)
January 31, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated basic information
Sloans Ferry Bridge (Gaston County, North Carolina)
Steel stringer bridge over Catawba River on U.S. Highways 29 & 74 (Wilkinson Boulevard)
January 31, 2017: New photos
Sarpy Creek Bridge (Treasure County, Montana)
Pony truss bridge over Sarpy Creek on CR 011
January 26, 2017: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated bridge type--this is a Warren pony truss with all verticals
Prairie Dog Creek Bridge (Harlan County, Nebraska)
Through truss bridge over Prairie Dog Creek, 0.5 mi. north and 4.0 mi. west of Woodruff
December 14, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Corrected state and county per Robert's post
Williams Fork River CR 330 Bridge (Grand County, Colorado)
4-panel Pratt pony truss bridge over Williams Fork River on CR 330
December 12, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated bridge type and description.
Platte Purchase Bridge (Platte County, Missouri)
Lost Cantilever through truss bridge over the Missouri River on Northbound US 69 in Kansas City
December 9, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Bridge has been replaced.
Warm Springs Road Bridge (Fremont County, Wyoming)
Lost Bowstring pony truss bridge over Big Wind River on Airport Rd. (CR 21)
December 7, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated status and location--bridge has been replaced.
4th Street Bridge (OLD) (Dodge County, Wisconsin)
Bowstring pony truss bridge over Rock River on 4th St.
December 6, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated county--this location is in Dodge County.
West Swan River Bridge (St. Louis County, Minnesota)
Lost Pony truss bridge over West Swan River on CR 965
November 21, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: This bridge has been replaced.
Cannon Bottoms Road Bridge (North Truss) (Goodhue County, Minnesota)
Lost through truss bridge over Cannon River in Red Wing, northern of two truss bridges.
October 4, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: New GE imagery shows no bridge here
Cannon Bottoms Road Bridge (North Truss) (Goodhue County, Minnesota)
Lost through truss bridge over Cannon River in Red Wing, northern of two truss bridges.
October 4, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: New GE imagery shows an incredible lack
Bear Creek Bridge (Fillmore County, Minnesota)
Pratt through truss bridge over Bear Creek on Nature RD
September 22, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated per forum post--this bridge has been bypassed and left in place.
Ashburn Street Bridge (Fillmore County, Minnesota)
Lost Pratt through truss bridge over Root River on MN 250 north of Lanesboro
September 22, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Updated per forum post--this bridge has been replaced.
Harvey Mountain Bridge (Litchfield County, Connecticut)
Warren pony truss with all verticals bridge in Colebrook Lake
September 19, 2016: Added
Knob Road Bridge (Walworth County, Wisconsin)
Abandoned pratt through truss bridge over White River on Knob Road (Abandoned)
September 3, 2016: New photos
Brown Road Bridge (Delaware County, Ohio)
Through truss bridge over Bokes Creek on TR 176
August 23, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: This bridge has been replaced.
St. Anthony Parkway Bridge (Hennepin County, Minnesota)
5-span Warren through truss bridge over BNSF Railroad on St. Anthony Parkway in Minneapolis
August 11, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Bridge has been removed
Platte River Bridge (Morrison County, Minnesota)
Lost Warren pony truss bridge over Platte River on CR 353
July 8, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Gone; Morrison County is now truss-free.
Maple Mill Bridge (Washington County, Iowa)
Lost through truss bridge over English River on Fir Avenue
June 16, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: New Google Earth imagery shows this bridge lying in a pile with a lot of debris piled up on its west side
Freedom Bridge (Carroll County, Indiana)
Pennsylvania through truss bridge over IN-25 (Hoosier Heartland Highway) on the Monon High Bridge Trail
May 20, 2016: New Street View added
Rush River Bridge (Pierce County, Wisconsin)
Lost Riveted Parker through truss bridge over Rush River on US 63
May 18, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: This bridge has been replaced.
UP/Cedar Lake Trail - MN100 Overpasses (Hennepin County, Minnesota)
Lost steel stringer bridge over Mn 100 on UP RR/Cedar Lake Bike Trail
April 27, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Bridges have both been replaced
UP/Cedar Lake Trail - MN100 Overpasses (Hennepin County, Minnesota)
Lost steel stringer bridge over Mn 100 on UP RR/Cedar Lake Bike Trail
April 27, 2016: Updated by Matt Lohry: Bridges have both been replaced

Recent Comments 

Posted May 24, 2018

I don’t see any steel stringers—It looks like the original floor system is still in place and it still functions as a truss, which is good news; however, a center bent support was added at some point to help increase load capacity.

Auburn Bridge (Wisconsin)
Posted May 10, 2018

I stopped to see this bridge earlier today, and I wish I hadn’t. It’s a truly heartbreaking sight. Damage is far worse than I imagined. It would take a miracle worker to fix this one :’(

Bridge comment
Posted May 3, 2018

Just can’t keep the political crap out of this, can you!? And, as always, too YELLOW to put your real name with your asinine comment! Political whining is what Facebook is for, not Bridgehunter.

Posted May 2, 2018

I believe they’re “French” drains, likely installed because the road surface under the bridge is at a low point. A French drain is just a grate with gravel or other soil underneath that water can pass through to the ground water table. This drain type doesn’t require any plumbing to carry water away.

Posted April 23, 2018

It looks like there actually is some exposed rebar at the very top of Photo #11, indicating a concrete bridge.

Posted April 20, 2018

Looks like Anonymous is going crazy and arguing with him(her)self...

Posted April 13, 2018

The arson reports first surfaced on the American Society of Civil Engineers website, which is otherwise perfectly legitimate, so to me there was all the reason in the world to take the story as legitimate. If it were Wikipedia, Pinterest, Facebook, or other similar social media outlets, then there would be more reason for scrutiny, but given the circumstances I cannot fault Amanda for taking the story as truth. At least we all know what’s going on now!

Posted April 10, 2018

Hi Amanda, I’m certainly not trying to create schism on this website, and to the bridge’s credit it is a truss, but the positives end there....this is a common, bland, Wal-mart inspired, mail-order bridge that is found in many, many parks across the country. They have used this bridge type in at least one location in my state of Wisconsin to replace an actual historic (and beautiful) truss bridge that was not in the way of anything and was in great shape, which is senseless and destructive. In this case, thankfully, they didn’t replace an historic bridge, but they could have used an actual historic bridge here instead of this, which would have enhanced this area and preserved a piece of history. With New York City’s commendable preservation record, I’m actually surprised that they went this route here.

Posted April 9, 2018

I think they gave it that name because it’s so painfully ugly that when you walk across it you’d swear you were walking into hell.

Posted April 9, 2018

The 2015 bridge is built over Bronx Kill and is built through the arched supports for this bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/ny/new-york/amtrak---bronx-kill/

The Othmar Amman bridge is the blue lift footbridge that Luke referenced before.

The bridge in the photo is built over Little Hell Gate and was built in 2003. If you go to google earth to this bridge and use the clock function, you will see that the bridge appears in the August 2003 frame.

Posted April 9, 2018

Folks, I have an explanation—the 2015 bridge is built over Bronx Kill right underneath the existing Bronx Kill Amtrak Bridge, on the northeast side of Randall’s Island. It’s not visible from the satellite view, but it’s there. The bridge in the photo was built in Summer 2003 (the caption with Photo #3 came from Pinterest and is incorrect).

Posted January 6, 2018

I’ll attempt to add a bit of engineering sense to this connection type, as they were done like this for a couple of reasons: as Nathan mentions, one primary advantage of pinned joints is that they theoretically eliminate a force that is referred to as a “moment”. A moment is a rotating force that exists in true rigid connections, such as in the case of a street light pole bolted to a concrete foundation, where there are 3 different forces acting on the base of the pole—you have an axial (up and down) force, a shear (sideways), and you have the rotating bending moment. Changing to a pinned connection eliminates the moment, leaving only the axial and shear forces to calculate. This greatly simplifies calcs when doing them manually. The other reason for this type of connection is that the beams at the time were not long enough to allow the distances between spans that they needed, so simply placing each beam between supports wasn’t feasible. This was the solution. It was done to allow the supports to hold up the adjoining beams and to suspend intermediate beams with pins, thereby allowing greater distances between supports. Cantilever truss bridges function very much the same way. Stringer bridges these days use beams that can span much longer distances, so this connection type is not commonly used anymore. And to answer Don’s question, yes, these are effective expansion joints as well. If you remove the pinned plate, you would find a “stair-step” joint underneath that allows independent side-to-side movement for expansion. Hope this helps to clear things up a bit.

Posted January 2, 2018

The connections are all riveted, which is making me question that date...I could be wrong, but it seems to me that rigid connections did not come into use until after the turn of the 20th century.

Posted December 19, 2017

Let us also keep in mind that this track is brand new, which eliminates the infrastructure spending reasoning right there...this track was placed in the exact same spot that the old track was...they pulled up the rails and ties and laid new ones in the same exact place; they did not change the alignment at all. The curve that the derailment occurred on was just fine...for freight trains traveling at 30 mph or less, not for a train moving at 80 mph—not to speak of the fact that this curve has a posted 30-mph speed limit. Basically, the operator of the train ignored the speed limit, and that’s what caused the wreck.

Posted December 8, 2017

They’re all high-fiving themselves because they “preserved it digitally”!! EPIC FAIL