Michael Quiet

About Me 

Email: mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com

My only regret is that it took me so long to realize how much I loved bridges.

It seems like a lot of folks on here had their realization early on in life that they had an affinity for the subtle beauty of bridges. Me? Not so much. I always had a fascination with bridges growing up, primarily covered bridges. However it was merely a passing interest in their historical nature, concepts like differing truss styles never even occurring to me. I would always go out of my way to see covered bridges however, and it was a daily delight that my daily commute to college required crossing a covered bridge

During my college years for my photography course I did a segment on bridges, cataloging what are now to me gems, such as Vermont’s longest Paddleford Truss covered bridge, the Sanborn Bridge in Lyndonville, VT. Again though, my interest was primarily in the bridges historical nature and all the details of the bridge otherwise being lost on me.

Then one day in the summer of 2013 everything changed.

I was driving in northeastern Vermont, just cruising about. On the Vermont roadmap there was a historical marker in Highgate falls for a “parabolic bridge”. I was close by, and I was curious what a parabolic bridge was, so we made course for the small town. My minds eye determined that this “parabolic” bridge was some modern creation, as a shape like that is never something I would expect to be old.

While driving along I spotted an old bypassed metal bridge, and decided to stop. As I approached the bridge it dawned on me that it was unlike any old metal bridge I had ever seen, as it wasn’t trapezoidal like all the other bridges I was used to. It then dawned on me, admiring the distinctive upper and lower chords, that this was the parabolic bridge that I was searching for. As I began to cross the bridge I looked up at the Berlin Iron Bridge Co. builders plaque, I was stopped by the build date: 1887

How could such an beautiful, gracefully elegant, and complicated bridge have been built in 1887? It didn’t make any sense to me at the time (Mind you I grew up in Vermont, where covered bridges continued to be constructed well into the early 1900’s, so I had no experience with early iron bridges). I became obsessed with this bridge, slowly learning the distinctions of the truss type, concepts such as pin-connected versus riveted, and terms such as “hangers” and “chords”.

Since then my life hasn't been the same. As I learned of the lenticular truss I had to learn about other trusses (as the lenticular truss can employ either Pratt or Warren webbing), and my interest branched out to the truss bridges. I now enjoy investigating and cataloging all types of truss bridges, metal or wooden with a mostly equal level, with a continued special interest in the lenticular truss.

Happy bridge hunting!

Favorite Photos 

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Kinderhook Creek Bridge

Kinderhook Creek Bridge (Columbia County, New York)
Looking at the bridge from upstream

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Water Street Bridge

Water Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Overview

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Pine Street Bridge

Pine Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Eastern portal

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Mosley Bridge

Moseley Bridge (Bennington County, Vermont)

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Bardwell's Ferry Bridge

Bardwell's Ferry Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Eastern approach

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Town Line Bridge

Town Line Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
View from the riverbed

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Keeseville Suspension Bridge

Keeseville Suspension Bridge (Essex County, New York)

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Green Iron Bridge

Green Iron Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Overview, from route 30

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Pineground Bridge

Pineground Bridge (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)
Overview

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The Shea Bridge

Shea Bridge (Providence County, Rhode Island)
Overview

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Yaleville Road Bridge

Yaleville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Profile of the 1892 Lenticular through truss

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Livermore Falls Bridge

Livermore Falls Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
The surviving river span as seen from the river, looking north towards the old Mill site

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Grantville Road Bridge

Grantville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Looking at the 1886 lenticular warren truss

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Hadley Bow Bridge

Hadley Bow Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Profile of the last remaining example of a lenticular half-through (semi-deck) lenticular truss bridge, fabricated in 1885 by Berlin Iron Bridge Co.

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South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge

South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge (Broome County, New York)
Southern portal

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Delage Farm Road Bridge

Iron Furnace Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Looking at the bridge from the river side of the park.

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Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge

Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge (Jefferson County, New York)
View from downstream

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Ruhle Road Bridge

Ruhle Road Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Southern approach

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Aiken Street Bridge

Aiken Street Bridge (Middlesex County, Massachusetts)

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Vischers Ferry Bridge

Vischers Ferry Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)

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Recent Updates 

Sawyers Crossing Covered Bridge 29-03-05 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Two-span covered bridge over Ashuelot River on Sawyers Crossing Road in Swanzey
May 22, 2017: New photos
Charles Dana Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 119 in Hinsdale
May 22, 2017: New video
Charles Dana Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 119 in Hinsdale
May 22, 2017: New photos
Abandoned BM (Fort Hill Branch) - Connecticut River Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Abandoned baltimore through truss bridge over Connecticut River on B&M Fort Hill Branch (abandoned)
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted details
Old Stone Arch Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Stone arch bridge over Ashuelot River on Bypassed Historic in Keene
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected build date, 1923 was a rehab date.
Anna Hunt Marsh Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 119 in Hinsdale
May 21, 2017: New video
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #4 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #4 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #3 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #3 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #2 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #2 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #1 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #1 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Coburn Covered Bridge 45-12-02 (Washington County, Vermont)
Covered bridge over Winooski River on Coburn Road (C3030)
May 10, 2017: New photos
Yancey Road Bridge (Frio County, Texas)
Lenticular through truss bridge over Pond on Private Road
May 10, 2017: Added
South Main Street Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Concrete tee beam bridge over Sleepers River on Main Street
May 10, 2017: New photos
WACR - Sleeper River Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Double barreled pony plate girder bridge over Sleeper River on Washington County Railroad
May 10, 2017: New photo
Carver Street Culvert (Rutland County, Vermont)
Concrete culvert bridge over Unnamed Creek on Carver Street
May 5, 2017: Added
Sanderson Covered Bridge 45-11-02 #2 (Rutland County, Vermont)
Covered Town Lattice bridge over Otter Creek on Pearl Street (C2004) in Brandon
May 4, 2017: New photos
East Shoreham Covered Railroad Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Covered Howe through truss bridge over Lemon Fair River on pedestrian path
May 1, 2017: New photos
Carver Street Bridge (Rutland County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss bridge with all verticles over Otter Creek on Carver Street in Brandon
May 1, 2017: New photo
VTR - Otter Creek Bridge (Middlebury) (Addison County, Vermont)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Otter Creek on Vermont Railway
May 1, 2017: New photos
Penobscot Bridge (Penobscot County, Maine)
Lost Through truss bridge over Penobscot River and ST Rail yard on Route 15 in Bangor
April 24, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected truss type; this was a Baltimore, not a Pennsylvania
Cadys Falls Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Pratt through truss bridge over Lamoille River on TR 2/FAS 239 in Morristown
April 21, 2017: New video
Pine Brook Covered Bridge 45-12-12 (Washington County, Vermont)
Kingpost through truss bridge over Pine Brook on Town Highway 3
April 21, 2017: New video
Checkered House Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Winooski River on US 2 in Richmond
April 21, 2017: New video
Beers Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pratt pony truss bridge over Ausable River on Park Road
April 16, 2017: New photos
CP - NY22 Overpass #2 (Essex County, New York)
Pony/through plate girder bridge over NY22 on Delaware & Hudson Railway
April 12, 2017: New photo
Walton Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Lost Lenticular through truss bridge over East Ausable River on Doctor Ray Road
April 12, 2017: New photo
AuSable Chasm Bridge (Clinton County, New York)
Steel arch bridge over AuSable River on US 9
April 12, 2017: New photos
Upper Keeseville Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pin connected Pratt through truss bridge over AuSable River on River Street in Keeseville
April 12, 2017: New photos
West Branch AuSable River Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over West Branch AuSable River on US 9N in Au Sable Forks
April 10, 2017: New photos
Schroon River Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Through truss bridge over Schroon River on US 9
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 2014
J & J Rogers Mill Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pratt through truss bridge over Ausable River on Former light railway
April 9, 2017: Added
Keeseville Suspension Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Suspension footbridge over AuSable River beyond the end of Clinton Street in Keeseville
April 9, 2017: New photos
Jay Covered Bridge 32-16-01 (Essex County, New York)
Covered Howe Truss bridge over East Branch Ausable River on CR 22
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder
Keeseville Stone Arch Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Stone arch bridge over AuSable River on Main Street in Keeseville
April 9, 2017: New photos
Stickney Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over East Branch AuSable River on Stickney Bridge Road
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 2013
Grove Road Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pratt Through truss bridge over East Branch AuSable River on Grove Road
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 1993
East Branch AuSable River Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over East Branch AuSable River on Sheldrake Road (CR 65)
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 1991
Lacy Road Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over East Branch AuSable River on Lacy Road
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 2006
East Branch AuSable River Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over East Branch AuSable River on NY 73
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 2016
Johns Brook Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over Johns Brook on NY 73
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 2016
Bouquet River Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pony truss bridge over Bouquet River on CR 55
April 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that the historic bridge was lost in 2006
Abandoned DH (AuSable Branch) - Palmer Brook Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Abandoned deck plate girder bridge over Palmer Brook on Former Delaware & Hudson RR (Ausable Branch)
April 9, 2017: Added
Sanderson Covered Bridge 45-11-02 #2 (Rutland County, Vermont)
Covered Town Lattice bridge over Otter Creek on Pearl Street (C2004) in Brandon
April 8, 2017: New photos
Bridge Street Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Parker through truss bridge over Winooski River on TR 1/FAS 209 in Richmond
April 4, 2017: New photos
Kedron Brook Bridge (Windsor County, Vermont)
Stone arch bridge over Kedron Brook on Densmore Hill Rd. in Woodstock
March 27, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added link to NRHP Nomination. Corrected build date
Salmon River Bridge (Franklin County, New York)
Through truss bridge over Salmon River on Cargin Road
March 27, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted bridge was replaced in 2008

Recent Comments 

Posted May 25, 2017

Its a tough call as it is a pretty generic plate design, but I'd be inclined to go with RF Hawkins just as they were a larger fabricator, and the design looks similar to this one that UMass Amherst has, although I wish there were better pictures:

http://www.ecs.umass.edu/adaptive_bridge_use/bridge_files/re...

Posted May 22, 2017

Builders plaque and portal cresting is a solid match for Owego Bridge Co.

Posted May 21, 2017

This is by far the interesting railroad bridge I have yet to document. The scale and complexity of it was actually a bit staggering...especially in the context of a more rural part of the country where dual-tracked railroad bridges are non-existent (this is the only one in either VT or NH), and the scale of the single track ones never quite come to this level of heavy duty.

The design features are also quite unique. This is pretty late for a pin connected railroad bridge, giving it a elegant look with massive eye-bars and pins. Accounting to a very complex maneuver of crossing the river, the bridge executes 2 turns across the river, creating an even wider 1st span to accommodate the turn. Looking closer, you'll realize that the decking itself is actually built to incline into the curve, making it look crooked at first glance.

Well worth the visit. Wish they could convert this to a rail trail someday, the bridge itself is in excellent condition.

Posted May 21, 2017

Thanks for going back for the plaque Chester!

The Red Bridge (Connecticut)
Posted May 18, 2017

Very interesting find here...it indeed looks like a bridge built of the Douglas patent. I have seen occasional mention of Corrugated Metal Co. building a few spans based on the Elliptical truss patent, but these bridges were quite crude and did not hold up well (no doubt owing to some of the design faults visible in the patent drawings, note that the diagonals are sloping in the wrong direction!). It was only when the Yale educated engineer Charles Jarvis was brought in that the design was refined (adding counters to each panel and smoothing out the upper and lower chords) to create the lenticular truss we know.

I'd opt for referring to it as an Elliptical Truss though, just to highlight the difference between this bridge and the extant lenticular trusses that remain today.

Posted May 17, 2017

Robert,

Something must have changed in the last few years with NY's approach to historic bridges, as my last couple of jaunts through upstate NY (Clinton/Essex counties) have shown a large number of historic bridges lost, either being replaced by modern welded pony trusses or in the most recent ones just UCEB's. Even some of the more modern 1930's have been subject to replacement in the last few years, despite still being in relatively good condition.

Posted May 12, 2017

In the last picture you can see a builders plate attached to the railing. If my eyes aren't deceiving me that's Berlin Construction Co., which would match for its location and style.

Chester did you happen to get a picture of it? I'm curious what year this one is!

Posted May 10, 2017

I've been looking for this bridge for quite some time, as it was listed in older publications of extant Lenticular truss bridges and I was persistently optimistic that it had to be somewhere. Otherwise though, there isn't too much info to go on. It appears to be on private property of a ranch. In older info this was referred to as the Yancey Road Bridge, so either this is an old alignment of the road or the bridge was relocated from the adjacent Yancey Road.

Hopefully a bridgehunter from that region can find some more info on this bridge, or maybe knock on a door and see about getting some pictures!

Posted May 10, 2017

Glad I was in the neighborhood to give this one a quick documentation. A replacement bridge is being built alongside it, with it looking to be getting close to done. Demolition of this bridge will probably follow soon after.

Posted May 1, 2017

George, it was my first time ever coming across that stamp in all of my travels, so I don't think it was too common (of course its not like mid 1890's railroad bridges are anywhere near as common as I'd like).

I did find it odd that the stamp was just "Reading, PA" though. But for companies at that time and place Reading Iron Co. seems to fit.

Posted May 1, 2017

Did a site visit on April 30th. I was very happy to see that the bridge got a rehabilitation in 2015, showing that the VTR intends to keep this bridge in service for more years to come. This is important as this is the oldest RR bridge still in service in VT, as well as the only wrought iron one and also as long span example of a riveted double intersection Warren truss

There was some loss of historic integrity of the bridge with this rehab though; Both abutments were rebuilt with concrete (replacing one original stone abutment), some strengthening steel plates were added to the endposts, several rivets replaced with bolts, and the largest hit being the original girder deck stringers being replaced by modern steel stringers. However the overall function of the truss was not affected, and no repairs or modifications had to be made to the truss web.

Not too bad overall. Wish more truss bridges were maintained like this!

Florida Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 26, 2017

Another bridge I wish I had a time machine for. Its so fascinating how utilitarian is is in comparison to its rural surroundings. And there are several unique design details that make it quite different from remaining examples of this type.

Thanks for uploading Chester! Its cool to see it in color :)

Blodgett's Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted April 24, 2017

Hopefully the builders plates were recovered by a state agency for storage and not stolen. It was the only Berlin Construction plates in a shield style I had ever seen and were pretty cool.

Needless to say though it'd be more preferable that they remained on this unique pony truss and the bridge was lovingly rehabilitated for continued use.

Posted April 23, 2017

looks like a Whipple Bowstring and a regular Pratt truss.

It'd be pretty cool to find the two different Whipple types together though :)

Beers Bridge (New York)
Posted April 16, 2017

Groton does seem likely now, comparing details with other extant ponies it does seem similar. Thanks Nathan!