Michael Quiet

About Me 

Email: mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com

My only regret is that it took me so long to realize how much I loved bridges.

It seems like a lot of folks on here had their realization early on in life that they had an affinity for the subtle beauty of bridges. Me? Not so much. I always had a fascination with bridges growing up, primarily covered bridges. However it was merely a passing interest in their historical nature, concepts like differing truss styles never even occurring to me. I would always go out of my way to see covered bridges however, and it was a daily delight that my daily commute to college required crossing a covered bridge

During my college years for my photography course I did a segment on bridges, cataloging what are now to me gems, such as Vermont’s longest Paddleford Truss covered bridge, the Sanborn Bridge in Lyndonville, VT. Again though, my interest was primarily in the bridges historical nature and all the details of the bridge otherwise being lost on me.

Then one day in the summer of 2013 everything changed.

I was driving in northeastern Vermont, just cruising about. On the Vermont roadmap there was a historical marker in Highgate falls for a “parabolic bridge”. I was close by, and I was curious what a parabolic bridge was, so we made course for the small town. My minds eye determined that this “parabolic” bridge was some modern creation, as a shape like that is never something I would expect to be old.

While driving along I spotted an old bypassed metal bridge, and decided to stop. As I approached the bridge it dawned on me that it was unlike any old metal bridge I had ever seen, as it wasn’t trapezoidal like all the other bridges I was used to. It then dawned on me, admiring the distinctive upper and lower chords, that this was the parabolic bridge that I was searching for. As I began to cross the bridge I looked up at the Berlin Iron Bridge Co. builders plaque, I was stopped by the build date: 1887

How could such an beautiful, gracefully elegant, and complicated bridge have been built in 1887? It didn’t make any sense to me at the time (Mind you I grew up in Vermont, where covered bridges continued to be constructed well into the early 1900’s, so I had no experience with early iron bridges). I became obsessed with this bridge, slowly learning the distinctions of the truss type, concepts such as pin-connected versus riveted, and terms such as “hangers” and “chords”.

Since then my life hasn't been the same. As I learned of the lenticular truss I had to learn about other trusses (as the lenticular truss can employ either Pratt or Warren webbing), and my interest branched out to the truss bridges. I now enjoy investigating and cataloging all types of truss bridges, metal or wooden with a mostly equal level, with a continued special interest in the lenticular truss.

Happy bridge hunting!

Favorite Photos 

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Water Street Bridge

Water Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Overview

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Pine Street Bridge

Pine Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Eastern portal

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Mosley Bridge

Moseley Bridge (Bennington County, Vermont)

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Bardwell's Ferry Bridge

Bardwell's Ferry Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Eastern approach

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Town Line Bridge

Town Line Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
View from the riverbed

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Keeseville Suspension Bridge

Keeseville Suspension Bridge (Essex County, New York)

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Kinderhook Creek Bridge

Kinderhook Creek Bridge (Columbia County, New York)
Looking at the bridge from upstream

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Green Iron Bridge

Green Iron Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Overview, from route 30

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Pineground Bridge

Pineground Bridge (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)
Overview

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The Shea Bridge

Shea Bridge (Providence County, Rhode Island)
Overview

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Yaleville Road Bridge

Yaleville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Profile of the 1892 Lenticular through truss

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Livermore Falls Bridge

Livermore Falls Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
The surviving river span as seen from the river, looking north towards the old Mill site

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Grantville Road Bridge

Grantville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Looking at the 1886 lenticular warren truss

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Hadley Bow Bridge

Hadley Bow Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Profile of the last remaining example of a lenticular half-through (semi-deck) lenticular truss bridge, fabricated in 1885 by Berlin Iron Bridge Co.

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South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge

South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge (Broome County, New York)
Southern portal

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Delage Farm Road Bridge

Iron Furnace Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Looking at the bridge from the river side of the park.

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Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge

Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge (Jefferson County, New York)
View from downstream

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Ruhle Road Bridge

Ruhle Road Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Southern approach

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Aiken Street Bridge

Aiken Street Bridge (Middlesex County, Massachusetts)

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Vischers Ferry Bridge

Vischers Ferry Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)

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Recent Updates 

Kedron Brook Bridge (Windsor County, Vermont)
Stone arch bridge over Kedron Brook on Densmore Hill Rd. in Woodstock
March 27, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added link to NRHP Nomination. Corrected build date
Salmon River Bridge (Franklin County, New York)
Through truss bridge over Salmon River on Cargin Road
March 27, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted bridge was replaced in 2008
Connecticut River Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Steel through arch bridge over Connecticut River on US 302 in Haverhill
March 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected Build date. NBI gives a incorrect 1928 instead of the correct 1923
Ranger Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Lost Warren deck truss bridge over Connecticut River
March 21, 2017: Added
Main Street Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Concrete tee beam bridge over Otter Brook on NH Hwy. 12/ Main Street
March 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that this bridge was lost in 1993. Added builders
Ledyard Covered Bridge (Windsor County, Vermont)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Connecticut River on present day Wheelock Street
March 17, 2017: Added
Penobscot River Bridge (Old) (Penobscot County, Maine)
Lost Pennsylvania Through truss bridge over Penobscot River on Rt 155
March 16, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted truss type
WACR - Depot Square Overpass (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Timber stringer bridge over Depot Square/Bay Street Extension on WACR & abandoned MEC railroads
March 15, 2017: Added
Depot Street Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Warren Through truss bridge over Deer River on Depot Street 9CR 92A)
March 15, 2017: New photos
Kane Road Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Parker through truss bridge over Missisquoi River on Kane Road (C2003) in Sheldon
March 14, 2017: New video
Depot Street Bridge (Windsor County, Vermont)
Lost Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Black River on Depot Street
March 14, 2017: Added
Black Creek Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss bridge over Black Creek on Bouchard Road in Sheldon
March 13, 2017: New video
Little River State Park High Bridge (Washington County, Vermont)
Abandoned timber stringer bridge over Branch of Stevenson Brook on Abandoned Road
March 11, 2017: Added
MMER - Waterbury Center Trestle (Washington County, Vermont)
Lost Timber Trestle bridge over Bryant Brook on Mount Mansfield Electric Railway
March 11, 2017: Added
MMER - Graves Brook Bridge (Washington County, Vermont)
Lost Bridge over Graves Brook on Mount Mansfield Electric Railway
March 11, 2017: Added
Barret Bridge (3rd) (Orange County, New York)
Lost Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Delaware River
March 10, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added builder based on builders plaque
Pup Hill Bridge (Old) (Clinton County, New York)
Lost Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Saranac River on Pup Hill Road
March 9, 2017: Added
Mechanic Street Covered Bridge 29-04-06 (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Covered bridge over Israel River on Mechanic Street in Lancaster
March 8, 2017: New photos
LVRC - Cambridge Junction Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Deck plate girder bridge over Lamoille River on Lamoille Valley Railroad
March 8, 2017: New photos
Moxley Covered Bridge 45-09-01 (Orange County, Vermont)
Covered bridge over First Branch White River on Moxley Rd (C3068) in Chelsea
March 8, 2017: New photos
NECR - West River Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Warren through truss with all verticals bridge over West River on New England Central Railroad
March 7, 2017: New photos
Bridgewater Corners Bridge (New) (Windsor County, Vermont)
Pratt through truss bridge over Ottauquechee River on VT 100A
March 7, 2017: Added
Moseley Bridge (Bennington County, Vermont)
Tubular wrough iron bowstring pony arch bridge over creek on pedestrian pathway
March 7, 2017: New photos
Tucker Toll Covered Bridge 45-13-54x / 29-03-22x (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Lost Covered Town Lattice through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Road
March 7, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected Pin location. Corrected counties
Highgate Falls Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Pin connected Lenticular through truss bridge over Missisquoi River on Mill Hill Rd
March 6, 2017: New photos
Holmes Creek Covered Bridge 45-04-01 (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Covered kingspost arch bridge over Home Creek on Lake Road in Charlotte
March 6, 2017: New photos
Black Creek Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss bridge over Black Creek on Bouchard Road in Sheldon
March 6, 2017: New photos
LVRC - Missisquoi River Bridge (Sheldon Junction) (Franklin County, Vermont)
Abandoned warren through truss with all verticals bridge over Missisquoi River on Abandoned Lamoille Valley Railroad (Former StJ&LC Railroad)
March 6, 2017: New photos
Lime Kiln Bridge (New) (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Open-spandrel arch bridge over Winooski River & NECR on Lime Kiln Road
March 6, 2017: New photos
Kane Road Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Parker through truss bridge over Missisquoi River on Kane Road (C2003) in Sheldon
March 6, 2017: New photos
Silk Road Covered Bridge 45-02-04 (Bennington County, Vermont)
Covered bridge over Walloomsac River on C3026 in Bennington
March 4, 2017: New photos
Cheshire Bridge (Sullivan County, New Hampshire)
Through truss bridge over Connecticut River on VT 11 / NH 11 in Charlestown
March 4, 2017: New photos
Hump Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Closed-spandrel arch bridge over Allen Brook on Sidewalk
March 2, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted local name; Noted rehab date
Hump Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Closed-spandrel arch bridge over Allen Brook on Sidewalk
March 2, 2017: New photos
Main Street Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Lost Pony/through plate girder bridge over Gihon River on Main Street
February 26, 2017: Added
Village Bridge (2nd) (Orange County, Vermont)
Lost Deck plate girder bridge over White River on Main Street
February 26, 2017: Added
NECR - Waterbury Bridge (Washington County, Vermont)
Pony plate girder bridge over US 2 & Graves Brook on New England Central Railroad
February 26, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted Builder
WACR - Boynton Street overpass (Washington County, Vermont)
Deck plate girder bridge over Boynton Street on Washington County Railroad
February 24, 2017: New photos
South Main Street Bridge (Washington County, Vermont)
Stone arch bridge over Jail Branch on VT 14 in Barre
February 24, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected bridge type; Added photos
WACR - Jail Branch Bridge (Washington County, Vermont)
Deck plate girder bridge over Jail Branch
February 24, 2017: New photo
North Hero - Allburgh Bridge (Grand Isle County, Vermont)
Lost Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge
February 21, 2017: Added
Sheldon Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Lost Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Missisquoi River on Abandoned alignment of Main Street
February 21, 2017: Added
Route 5 West River Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Lost Pennsylvania through truss bridge over White River on Route 5
February 17, 2017: Added
Route 5 Three Crossings Covered Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over White River on US Route 5
February 17, 2017: Added
WRRR - Three Crossings Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Lost Quadrangular lattice through truss bridge over West River on West River Railroad
February 17, 2017: Added
E. & T. Fairbanks & Company Two-Story Covered Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Two-Story Covered Town lattice truss with arches bridge over Sleepers River on Factory crossing
February 15, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected loss date & reason
Congress Street Bridge (Fairfield County, Connecticut)
Bascule bridge over Pequonnock River on Congress Street in Bridgeport
February 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added builders
Vilas Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Open-Spandrel concrete arch bridge over Connecticut River on Bridge Street in Walpole
February 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added builders
Depot Rd Arch Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Concrete arch bridge over Rock River on TR 2/Depot Rd. in Newfane
February 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected build date. Added builder
Depot Street Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Concrete arch bridge over Power Dam Canal on C3448 in Bellows Falls
February 9, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Updated builder info

Recent Comments 

Posted March 21, 2017

Found a few additional pics in my trawling of the internet. This bridge was a fascinating little bit of engineering!

https://jaystravelog.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/ac-26a-long...

https://jaystravelog.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/ac-26-long-...

We can glean a few additional facts:

-The builders plaque looks to be a Groton Bridge Co. (Fits for the area)

-The truss webbing follows a Baltimore/Pennsylvania configuration

-The upper/lower chord configurations suggests that this is operating more as a cantilever then a straight suspension. Note the inversion in both the upper and lower chords from tension/compression to compression/tension (respectively) when it comes to the suspended span (I love how easy it to see what members to what in pin-connected bridges).

Thoughts on this?

Posted March 16, 2017

Google earth shows a replacement span being built just downstream from this truss bridge, so if its not gone it will be soon.

It a shame that this bridge was located in a state so hostile to truss bridges. At just under 1,000 feet with 5 spans this was an increasingly rare example of a long multi-span truss bridge.

Posted March 16, 2017

Looking at the finals, portal cresting, and builder plaque style this is a Berlin Iron Bridge Co. product. Given the truss style and details I would put fabrication for this bridge around 1895-1900.

Posted March 13, 2017

Bidding has been put out for the construction of this bridge. It'll be nice to see this one put back together!

http://www.bridgeconstruction.biz/bid_opportunities/2017/01/...

Posted March 10, 2017

The design of the builders plaque in the postcards clearly matches Owego Bridge Co. It also fits for the area.

Love these postcards...keep 'em coming :)

Posted March 7, 2017

Its already in trail use on the The Mile-Around Woods Trail. Its excellent that it was saved...even if it is just over a small ditch!

Posted March 7, 2017

Looks like the pin migrated north of where it should be. This bridge was located adjacent to the stone arch railroad bridge, and was replaced in 1930 by the Vilas Bridge. Thus it belongs in both Chesire County NH and Windham County, VT.

Here's a picture I found showing its location, you can see the arch rings of the railroad bridge in the backround.

http://lostnewengland.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/419_190...

re: Speaking of Precarious Bridges
Posted February 28, 2017

Well preservation should trump any other concerns. If concrete is needed, lets do it and keep the bridge healthy.

That being said though, personally I would love to see stone abutments rebuilt/maintained instead of faced/replaced with concrete. I know it doesn't ding its NRHP eligibility as much, but I would argue that there is some value in the substructures defining the character of a bridge. In my time doing this I've come to truly appreciate the craftsmanship and intricacy of a stone abutment, and find concrete ones to be boring (and on older bridges distracting).

Part of the appeal of a historic bridge is its link to the past. By giving a beautiful historic bridge a support system of fresh concrete, it looses that subtle but important appeal. Even for the non-pontists, I think the stone helps show the old/historic nature better then concrete ever could.

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 26, 2017

Art,

I wasn't actually familiar with those designs...its kinda amazing how many unique designs for bowstrings occurred. Even Mosley did a few different models aside from the Hares Hill bridge:

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/bennington/mosley/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/sullivan/bh49549/

It looked to me like the arch was a T section like the Hares Hill one, hence my leaning with that. Irregardless, its tough doing precision identification based off old postcards :P

Iron Bridge (New Jersey)
Posted February 25, 2017

This looks like it might be a small Mosley Lattice bowstring/arch. Compare with the last remaining example:

http://bridgehunter.com/pa/chester/hares-hill/

Posted February 19, 2017

The date is correct, this is a rebuilt one. The original 1867 bridge was destroyed by an overweight truck in 1980.

This is about as close as you could get to the original as possible though, it was built to the speicifications of the original by a local bridgewright Arnold Graton, who constructed his bridges in the exact fashion as they would have been historically (down to building them on the ground and dragging them into position by Oxen).

Posted February 19, 2017

Looks like an Owego Bridge Co. plaque. Given the area that would fit.

Posted February 17, 2017

Bridge continues to be at threat for demolition, with the timetable being moved up on replacing this and its counterpart span, with construction tenativley projected for 2019-2022. This project has been moving back and forth on timing, so nothing set in stone yet.

http://www.sentinelsource.com/news/local/hinsdale-brattlebor...

The good news is that the new bridge will be on a completely different alignment, and at least the possibility of retaining this span for pedestrian use is on the table. This should absolutely happen, given the important historic nature of this bridge (top among them is that its one of the last Storrs designed spans left in NH)

Also noted in the article that the Vilas Bridge, a spectacular 2 span open-spandrel arch upstream, is not getting a rehabilitation anytime soon (if ever).

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/windham/26200620005200/

Posted February 11, 2017

Good find on the builder Luke, I was curious about this one! Its a pretty remote one for Massillon as well.

Posted February 8, 2017

Never would've guessed that this was any sort of significant, having driven by it more times then I can count. Turns out its (as far as anyone can tell) the first concrete bridge to have been built in VT. And a pre-1900 concrete bridge as well makes it a rare find. I'll have to document it the next time I'm in that area!