Michael Quiet

About Me 

Email: mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com

My only regret is that it took me so long to realize how much I loved bridges.

It seems like a lot of folks on here had their realization early on in life that they had an affinity for the subtle beauty of bridges. Me? Not so much. I always had a fascination with bridges growing up, primarily covered bridges. However it was merely a passing interest in their historical nature, concepts like differing truss styles never even occurring to me. I would always go out of my way to see covered bridges however, and it was a daily delight that my daily commute to college required crossing a covered bridge

During my college years for my photography course I did a segment on bridges, cataloging what are now to me gems, such as Vermont’s longest Paddleford Truss covered bridge, the Sanborn Bridge in Lyndonville, VT. Again though, my interest was primarily in the bridges historical nature and all the details of the bridge otherwise being lost on me.

Then one day in the summer of 2013 everything changed.

I was driving in northeastern Vermont, just cruising about. On the Vermont roadmap there was a historical marker in Highgate falls for a “parabolic bridge”. I was close by, and I was curious what a parabolic bridge was, so we made course for the small town. My minds eye determined that this “parabolic” bridge was some modern creation, as a shape like that is never something I would expect to be old.

While driving along I spotted an old bypassed metal bridge, and decided to stop. As I approached the bridge it dawned on me that it was unlike any old metal bridge I had ever seen, as it wasn’t trapezoidal like all the other bridges I was used to. It then dawned on me, admiring the distinctive upper and lower chords, that this was the parabolic bridge that I was searching for. As I began to cross the bridge I looked up at the Berlin Iron Bridge Co. builders plaque, I was stopped by the build date: 1887

How could such an beautiful, gracefully elegant, and complicated bridge have been built in 1887? It didn’t make any sense to me at the time (Mind you I grew up in Vermont, where covered bridges continued to be constructed well into the early 1900’s, so I had no experience with early iron bridges). I became obsessed with this bridge, slowly learning the distinctions of the truss type, concepts such as pin-connected versus riveted, and terms such as “hangers” and “chords”.

Since then my life hasn't been the same. As I learned of the lenticular truss I had to learn about other trusses (as the lenticular truss can employ either Pratt or Warren webbing), and my interest branched out to the truss bridges. I now enjoy investigating and cataloging all types of truss bridges, metal or wooden with a mostly equal level, with a continued special interest in the lenticular truss.

Happy bridge hunting!

Favorite Photos 

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South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge

South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge (Broome County, New York)
Southern portal

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Kinderhook Creek Bridge

Kinderhook Creek Bridge (Columbia County, New York)
Looking at the bridge from upstream

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Water Street Bridge

Water Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Overview

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Pine Street Bridge

Pine Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Eastern portal

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Mosley Bridge

Moseley Bridge (Bennington County, Vermont)

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Bardwell's Ferry Bridge

Bardwell's Ferry Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Eastern approach

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Town Line Bridge

Town Line Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
View from the riverbed

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Keeseville Suspension Bridge

Keeseville Suspension Bridge (Essex County, New York)

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Green Iron Bridge

Green Iron Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Overview, from route 30

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Pineground Bridge

Pineground Bridge (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)
Overview

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The Shea Bridge

Shea Bridge (Providence County, Rhode Island)
Overview

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Yaleville Road Bridge

Yaleville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Profile of the 1892 Lenticular through truss

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Livermore Falls Bridge

Livermore Falls Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
The surviving river span as seen from the river, looking north towards the old Mill site

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Grantville Road Bridge

Grantville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Looking at the 1886 lenticular warren truss

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Hadley Bow Bridge

Hadley Bow Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Profile of the last remaining example of a lenticular half-through (semi-deck) lenticular truss bridge, fabricated in 1885 by Berlin Iron Bridge Co.

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Delage Farm Road Bridge

Iron Furnace Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Looking at the bridge from the river side of the park.

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Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge

Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge (Jefferson County, New York)
View from downstream

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Ruhle Road Bridge

Ruhle Road Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Southern approach

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Aiken Street Bridge

Aiken Street Bridge (Middlesex County, Massachusetts)

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Vischers Ferry Bridge

Vischers Ferry Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)

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Recent Updates 

Halpin Covered Bridge 45-01-03 (Addison County, Vermont)
Covered Town lattice through truss bridge over Muddy Branch of the New Haven River
July 23, 2017: New photos
Leicester Hollow Trail Bridge (Rutland County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Neshobe River on C3022
July 23, 2017: Added
NECR - Winooski River Bridge #3 (Washington County, Vermont)
Deck plate girder bridge over Winooski River on New England Central Railroad
July 20, 2017: New Street View added
NECR - Winooski River Bridge #3 (Washington County, Vermont)
Deck plate girder bridge over Winooski River on New England Central Railroad
July 15, 2017: New photos
RUT - Baldwin Dry Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Lost Steel stringer bridge over Richville Road & branch of Sawmill brook on Rutland Railroad (Addison Division)
July 14, 2017: Added
Kedron Brook Bridge (Windsor County, Vermont)
Stone arch bridge over Kedron Brook on C3066 in Woodstock
July 6, 2017: New Street View added
K,AC&LC Ausable Chasam Bridge (Clinton County, New York)
Lost Pratt deck truss bridge over Ausable River/Chasam
June 30, 2017: Added
Horse Farm Bridge (Hampshire County, Massachusetts)
Parker pony truss bridge
June 28, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected truss type. Noted Builder, corrected build date, and updated with original location.
Main Street Railroad Bridge (Rutland County, Vermont)
Steel arch bridge over Vermont Railway on Main street (TR 03 FAS 155)
June 23, 2017: Added
Marble Bridge (Rutland County, Vermont)
Marble arch bridge over Otter Creek on Main Street in Proctor
June 23, 2017: New photos
WACR - Woodsville-Wells River Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Pin Connected Baltimore deck & through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Railroad (WACR)
June 22, 2017: New photo
Portland Street Bridge (old) (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Pratt through truss bridge over Passumspic River on Portland Street (U.S. Route 2)
June 22, 2017: New photo
MEC - Passumpsic River Covered Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Passumpsic River on Maine Central Railroad
June 22, 2017: Added
Sherwood Road Bridge (Delaware County, New York)
Relocated Lenticular through truss bridge over West Branch Delaware River on Sherwood Road
June 20, 2017: Added
Woronoco Bridge (Old) (Hampden County, Massachusetts)
Lost Pin-Connected Lenticular through truss bridge over Westfield River on Bridge Street
June 14, 2017: Added
Iron Bridge at Howard Hill Road (Windsor County, Vermont)
Pratt through truss bridge over Black River on C3029 (Howard Hill Rd) in Cavendish
June 13, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that this bridge is not lost. Disassembled and put into storage for future use by the States historic bridge program
Long Lane Road Bridge (Steuben County, New York)
Abandoned lenticular pony truss bridge over Cohocton River on Long Lane Road
June 6, 2017: Added
Niobe Junction Bridge (Chautauqua County, New York)
Abandoned bridge over Little Brokenstraw Creek on Abandonded Malroy/Swede Road
June 6, 2017: Added
Bedell Covered Bridge (Orange County, Vermont)
Lost Burr arch-truss bridge over Conneticut River on Toll House Road
June 1, 2017: Added
Middlexsex Winooski River Bridge (Washington County, Vermont)
2 span Pratt Through Truss
May 31, 2017: New photo
Tenny Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Lost Pratt through truss bridge over Lamoille River on VT 15A in Morristown
May 30, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Changed to local name. Noted truss type
Greenbanks Hollow Bridge 45-03-01#2 (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Covered Queenspost through truss bridge over Joes Brook on C3054 in Danville
May 29, 2017: New photos
LVRC - Stannard Brook Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Deck plate girder bridge over Stannard Brrok and Stannard Mountain Road on LVRC
May 29, 2017: Added
Chamberlin Mill Covered Bridge 45-03-04 (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Covered Queenspost truss bridge over South Wheelock Branch on West Street in Lyndon
May 29, 2017: New photos
LVRC - Hardwick Lamoille River Bridge (East) (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Abandoned deck plate girder bridge over Lamoille River on Former St. J & LC railroad
May 29, 2017: New photos
Sawyers Crossing Covered Bridge 29-03-05 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Two-span covered bridge over Ashuelot River on Sawyers Crossing Road in Swanzey
May 22, 2017: New photos
Charles Dana Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 119 in Hinsdale
May 22, 2017: New video
Charles Dana Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 119 in Hinsdale
May 22, 2017: New photos
Abandoned BM (Fort Hill Branch) - Connecticut River Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Abandoned baltimore through truss bridge over Connecticut River on B&M Fort Hill Branch (abandoned)
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted details
Old Stone Arch Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Stone arch bridge over Ashuelot River on Bypassed Historic in Keene
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected build date, 1923 was a rehab date.
Anna Hunt Marsh Bridge (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 119 in Hinsdale
May 21, 2017: New video
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #4 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #4 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #3 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #3 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #2 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #2 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #1 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added pictures; Noted Builder and added info
Ashuelot Rail Trail - Ashuelot River Bridge #1 (Cheshire County, New Hampshire)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Ashuelot River on Ashuelot Rail Trail
May 21, 2017: New photos
Coburn Covered Bridge 45-12-02 (Washington County, Vermont)
Covered bridge over Winooski River on Coburn Road (C3030)
May 10, 2017: New photos
Yancey Road Bridge (Frio County, Texas)
Lenticular through truss bridge over Pond on Private Road
May 10, 2017: Added
South Main Street Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Concrete tee beam bridge over Sleepers River on Main Street
May 10, 2017: New photos
WACR - Sleeper River Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Double barreled pony plate girder bridge over Sleeper River on Washington County Railroad
May 10, 2017: New photo
Carver Street Culvert (Rutland County, Vermont)
Concrete culvert bridge over Unnamed Creek on Carver Street
May 5, 2017: Added
Sanderson Covered Bridge 45-11-02 #2 (Rutland County, Vermont)
Covered Town Lattice bridge over Otter Creek on Pearl Street (C2004) in Brandon
May 4, 2017: New photos
East Shoreham Covered Railroad Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Covered Howe through truss bridge over Lemon Fair River on pedestrian path
May 1, 2017: New photos
Carver Street Bridge (Rutland County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss bridge with all verticles over Otter Creek on Carver Street in Brandon
May 1, 2017: New photo
VTR - Otter Creek Bridge (Middlebury) (Addison County, Vermont)
Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Otter Creek on Vermont Railway
May 1, 2017: New photos
Penobscot Bridge (Penobscot County, Maine)
Lost Through truss bridge over Penobscot River and ST Rail yard on Route 15 in Bangor
April 24, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected truss type; this was a Baltimore, not a Pennsylvania
Cadys Falls Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Pratt through truss bridge over Lamoille River on TR 2/FAS 239 in Morristown
April 21, 2017: New video

Recent Comments 

Posted July 12, 2017

That's a Groton Bridge Co. production, I'd guess around 1890 based on the design details . The portal cresting is unusual, don't think I've ever seen that style used before.

Great find as always Dana!

Lilac Bridge (New Hampshire)
Posted July 8, 2017

Another success for New Hampshire's war on the legacy of John Storrs. With this we're pretty much down to the Anna Hunt, which will be coming up for replacement in the next few years http://bridgehunter.com/nh/cheshire/12500410004000/

Given how things are going I'm getting much less optimistic about the possibility of preservation.

This is a loss on several other levels, as an increasingly rare multi-span through truss, a rare product of the American Bridge/United Bridge duo, and as a survivor (2/3rds anyways) of the flood of 1936.

Posted June 28, 2017

Hello Paul,

I think one of the problems is that this isn't a 'real' covered bridge, as it looks the National Bridge Inventory identifies this as a pre-stressed concrete beam. There are quite a few of these around, and it gets kinda tricky to assign a genuine covered bridge truss type to them as they generally are more stylized and only loosely conform to the real patterns.

Generally I try to avoid assigning historic truss types to these as I feel that it might muddy the waters for others researching/visiting genuine covered bridges. For example this one up in my neck of the woods: http://bridgehunter.com/ny/essex/kissing/ has a resemblance to a Town Lattice, but since it doesn't work as one and is only decorative I think its inappropriate to pass it off as such. Instead I simply identify it as a covered plate girder, since the actual bridge is a plate girder type. Therefore on yours I would refer to that as a Covered stringer bridge, with a notation that the roof support has a truss like appearance, as it doesn't directly conform to any genuine type.

Hope that helps!

-Michael

Posted June 26, 2017

Found a video from Alpine Construction of them putting this bridge back in place during its 2016 rehabilitation:

https://youtu.be/rQVeGG0ZLBE

Posted June 25, 2017

In my site visit I found the trusses themselves to be in very good shape for how long this bridge has been closed. As you can see in the pictures there is no signs of stress deflection/deformation in the members, and no rust/rot problems. Newspaper articles from when it was closed were not explicit about the problems this bridge had, other then it was 'unsafe'. Couldn't have been that bad, as the bridge has stood for over 30 years since its closure.

Posted June 24, 2017

Is it just me or does that lenticular looks...off. From what I can figure, its missing an entire panel on one side. The end abutting against the covered bridge looks normal enough with the upper and lower chords meeting and the portal bracing offset. The other end has the portal bracing directly on the end, and the lower and upper chord don't come anywhere near meeting.

I'd be curious how this one came to be built like this. Maybe this was a recycled bridge cut down to fit a shorter crossing'?

Posted June 22, 2017

Nice find Luke! Its quite interesting to see more of the Texas variety of the Lenticulars unearthed

Posted June 14, 2017

I agree, more research is needed. But a quick thought on the width though, as I considered that as well: Since the line was operating on a curve, it would have to be wider to accommodate it. I've seen a few other examples in my time where a through railraod bridge was wider then normal to accommodate a curvature.

But either way it was definitely built for some use of the factory complex that was here.

Posted June 14, 2017

Well, its probably something to do with both of us having an affinity for the lenticular bridges :) The second I saw a notation of a lost Lenticular bridge on the successor bridge page I started looking for any info on it...looks like we came to the same sources!

Posted June 14, 2017

I checked out some old aerial imagery. It looks like there used to be a spur line that curved off the adjacent rail line and crossed the river to serve a factory on Water Street.

I couldn't see any time that it was used for road use though, so I can't speculate as to when or why it was paved over.

Posted June 11, 2017

Its a long time, but we can still be optimistic. We've had a Leneticular pony up here in VT has been in storage for 21 years now, but we are on schedule to have it reused on a pedestrian path within the next 3 years. Hope they can find a home for this one sooner!

Long Lane and Niobe
Posted June 8, 2017

I hope you can get out to Niobe Dana, I'm incredibly curious about that one. If it wasn't such a long haul from VT I'd throw the kayak on the car and check it out!

I've still got a couple lenticulars I'm working on getting confirmation for location/existence, and a couple of abandoned bridges in the Upstate to confirm as well, so I'll keep them coming :)

Posted June 8, 2017

Thanks for getting out to this one so fast Dana! Glad to see and hear that's it's still in good condition. Now if only we could get it rehabilitated and preserved...

Posted June 6, 2017

Found the saved trusses of this bridge. Looks like they are at an old town dump:

https://tinyurl.com/ybfzapks

Posted June 6, 2017

Always happy to add an extant Lenticular pony truss, even if it is abandoned! While looking for info online I was also happy to find that the HistoricBridges team has already documented this bridge. Pictures and info here:

http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=ne...