Michael Quiet

About Me 

Email: mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com

My only regret is that it took me so long to realize how much I loved bridges.

It seems like a lot of folks on here had their realization early on in life that they had an affinity for the subtle beauty of bridges. Me? Not so much. I always had a fascination with bridges growing up, primarily covered bridges. However it was merely a passing interest in their historical nature, concepts like differing truss styles never even occurring to me. I would always go out of my way to see covered bridges however, and it was a daily delight that my daily commute to college required crossing a covered bridge

During my college years for my photography course I did a segment on bridges, cataloging what are now to me gems, such as Vermont’s longest Paddleford Truss covered bridge, the Sanborn Bridge in Lyndonville, VT. Again though, my interest was primarily in the bridges historical nature and all the details of the bridge otherwise being lost on me.

Then one day in the summer of 2013 everything changed.

I was driving in northeastern Vermont, just cruising about. On the Vermont roadmap there was a historical marker in Highgate falls for a “parabolic bridge”. I was close by, and I was curious what a parabolic bridge was, so we made course for the small town. My minds eye determined that this “parabolic” bridge was some modern creation, as a shape like that is never something I would expect to be old.

While driving along I spotted an old bypassed metal bridge, and decided to stop. As I approached the bridge it dawned on me that it was unlike any old metal bridge I had ever seen, as it wasn’t trapezoidal like all the other bridges I was used to. It then dawned on me, admiring the distinctive upper and lower chords, that this was the parabolic bridge that I was searching for. As I began to cross the bridge I looked up at the Berlin Iron Bridge Co. builders plaque, I was stopped by the build date: 1887

How could such an beautiful, gracefully elegant, and complicated bridge have been built in 1887? It didn’t make any sense to me at the time (Mind you I grew up in Vermont, where covered bridges continued to be constructed well into the early 1900’s, so I had no experience with early iron bridges). I became obsessed with this bridge, slowly learning the distinctions of the truss type, concepts such as pin-connected versus riveted, and terms such as “hangers” and “chords”.

Since then my life hasn't been the same. As I learned of the lenticular truss I had to learn about other trusses (as the lenticular truss can employ either Pratt or Warren webbing), and my interest branched out to the truss bridges. I now enjoy investigating and cataloging all types of truss bridges, metal or wooden with a mostly equal level, with a continued special interest in the lenticular truss.

Happy bridge hunting!

Favorite Photos 

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Grantville Road Bridge

Grantville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Looking at the 1886 lenticular warren truss

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Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge

Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge (Jefferson County, New York)
View from downstream

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Janice Peaslee Bridge

Janice Peaslee Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)

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South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge

South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge (Broome County, New York)
Southern portal

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Kinderhook Creek Bridge

Kinderhook Creek Bridge (Columbia County, New York)
Looking at the bridge from upstream

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Water Street Bridge

Water Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Overview

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Pine Street Bridge

Pine Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Eastern portal

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Mosley Bridge

Moseley Bridge (Bennington County, Vermont)

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Bardwell's Ferry Bridge

Bardwell's Ferry Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Eastern approach

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Town Line Bridge

Town Line Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
View from the riverbed

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Keeseville Suspension Bridge

Keeseville Suspension Bridge (Essex County, New York)

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Green Iron Bridge

Green Iron Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Overview, from route 30

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Pineground Bridge

Pineground Bridge (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)
Overview

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The Shea Bridge

Shea Bridge (Providence County, Rhode Island)
Overview

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Yaleville Road Bridge

Yaleville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Profile of the 1892 Lenticular through truss

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Livermore Falls Bridge

Livermore Falls Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
The surviving river span as seen from the river, looking north towards the old Mill site

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Hadley Bow Bridge

Hadley Bow Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Profile of the last remaining example of a lenticular half-through (semi-deck) lenticular truss bridge, fabricated in 1885 by Berlin Iron Bridge Co.

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Delage Farm Road Bridge

Iron Furnace Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Looking at the bridge from the river side of the park.

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Ruhle Road Bridge

Ruhle Road Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Southern approach

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Aiken Street Bridge

Aiken Street Bridge (Middlesex County, Massachusetts)

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Vischers Ferry Bridge

Vischers Ferry Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)

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Recent Updates 

Jonesville Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Lost Parker through truss bridge over Winooski River on C2003
November 10, 2017: Added
Holyoke-South Hadley Bridge (Hampden County, Massachusetts)
Lost Triple-Intersection Lattice Through truss bridge over Connecticut River on MA-116
November 3, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added history, truss type, and builder info
Bennett Meadow Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Lost Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Great Meadow Road
November 1, 2017: Added
Stark Covered Bridge 29-04-05 (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Paddleford truss bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River on North or Northside Road (off of SR 110) in Stark
October 27, 2017: New photos
Sequin Bridge 45-04-02 (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Covered Burr arch-truss bridge over Lewis Creek on Roscoe Road
October 27, 2017: New photos
Queeche Covered Bridge 45-14-A #2 (Windsor County, Vermont)
Covered concrete beam bridge over Ottauquechee River on Waterman Hill Road
October 25, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Removed Pratt truss; This is a concrete stringer. Removed reference to height/weight restrictions. Imported NBI data
WACR - Passumpsic River Bridge #8 (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Baltimore through truss bridge over Passumpsic River on Washington County Railroad
October 8, 2017: New photo
Beards Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Connecticut River on North Monroe Road
October 2, 2017: Added
Joels Bridge (Carroll County, New Hampshire)
Lost Covered Paddleford through truss bridge over Saco River
October 2, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Filled out info & history of bridge
Suffield-Thompsonville Bridge (Hartford County, Connecticut)
Lost Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Main Street
September 29, 2017: Added
Jackman Road-Austin Stream (Old) (Somerset County, Maine)
Lost Lenticular pony truss bridge over Austin Stream on Jackman Road
September 27, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that this was a lenticular pony; Moved pin to historic bridge location.
Lower Waterford Bridge (old) (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Paddleford through truss bridge over Mad Brook on Lower Waterford Road
September 22, 2017: Added
John's Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Lost Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Missisquoi River on Old alignment of Route 7
September 22, 2017: Added
South Main Street Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Concrete tee beam bridge over Sleepers River on Main Street
September 17, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: This bridge has been demolished
LVRC - Bridge No. 54 (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Abandoned stone arch bridge over Stream on Lamoille Valley Railroad
September 17, 2017: New photos
Jeffersonville Route 108 Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Pratt through truss bridge over Lamoille River on VT 108 in Jeffersonville
September 8, 2017: New photo
West Milton Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Relocated Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Lamoille River on C3040
September 8, 2017: New photo
Williams River I-91 SB Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Warren deck truss with all verticals bridge over Williams River/GMRC RR on I-91SB
September 6, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that bridge is scheduled for demolition and replacement
Williams River I-91 NB Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Lost Warren deck truss with all verticals bridge over Williams River/GMRCRR on I-91 NB
September 6, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: This bridge has been demolished. Replacement in progress
Creekside Trail - Farm Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Lewis Creek on Trail / Farm Path
September 5, 2017: Added
Creekside Trail - Farm Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Lewis Creek on Trail / Farm Path
September 5, 2017: New photos
BM - Lindsley Bridge (old) (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Passumpsic River on Boston & Maine Railroad
August 25, 2017: Added
PRRT - BMS Railway Overpass (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Plate Girder Bridge over Berlin Mills Railway on PRRT
August 23, 2017: Added
Mason Street Bridge (older) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Lost Lenticular through truss bridge over Androscoggin River on Mason Street
August 23, 2017: Added
Samuel Paine Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Lost Paddleford through truss bridge over Androscoggin River
August 23, 2017: Added
Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned Whipple through truss bridge
August 23, 2017: New photos
NHCR - Upper Ammonoosuc River Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Through truss bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River on New Hampshire Central Railroad
August 23, 2017: New photos
Abandoned BMS - Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned bridge over Androscoggin River on Berlin Mills Railway
August 23, 2017: New photos
Berlin Mills Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Pratt through truss bridge over Androscoggin River in Berlin
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted designer and builder. Added pictures
Berlin Mills Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Pratt through truss bridge over Androscoggin River in Berlin
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted designer and builder. Added pictures
Abandoned BMS - Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned bridge over Androscoggin River on Berlin Mills Railway
August 22, 2017: Added
Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned Whipple through truss bridge
August 22, 2017: Added
Abandoned BMS - Cross Power Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
2 span skewed Whipple through truss bridge over Androscoggin River on former Berlin Mills Railway
August 22, 2017: Added
Bath Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Warren through truss bridge over Wild Ammonoosuc River on bypassed stretch of Rum Hill Road (US 302) in Bath
August 22, 2017: New photos
Janice Peaslee Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Pin connected Pratt through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Maidstone Bridge Road in Stratford
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Updated road name to current one; Added pictures
Groveton Covered Bridge 29-04-04 (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Covered bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River in Northumberland
August 22, 2017: New photos
Whitcomb Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Bypassed Pratt deck truss bridge over Connecticut River on former Gilman Rd in Dalton
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that this bridge is no longer open for pedestrians. Added pictures
MEC - NH135 Overpass (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Lost Steel stringer bridge over Nh135 on Main Central Railroad
August 22, 2017: Added
TSRD - Johns River Bridge (Whitefield) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Pony/through plate girder bridge over Johns River on Twin State Railroad
August 22, 2017: New photos
Bell Hill Road (Old) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Bypassed Warren pony truss Bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River on Bell Hill
August 22, 2017: Added
TSRD - Johns River Bridge (Dalton) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned deck plate girder bridge over Johns River on Twin State Railroad
August 22, 2017: Added
Piermont Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 25 in Piermont
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted builder; Added pictures; Changed to local name
Piermont Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Connecticut River on NH 25 in Piermont
August 22, 2017: New photos
Bell Hill Road (Old) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Bypassed Warren pony truss Bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River on Bell Hill
August 22, 2017: New photos
TSRD - Johns River Bridge (Dalton) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned deck plate girder bridge over Johns River on Twin State Railroad
August 22, 2017: New photos
East Thetford Road Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
2 span Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on East Thetford Road in Lyme
August 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted builder
East Thetford Road Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
2 span Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on East Thetford Road in Lyme
August 20, 2017: New photos
LVRC - Cambridge Junction Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Deck plate girder bridge over Lamoille River on Lamoille Valley Railroad
August 13, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that spans have been removed. Replacement in progress
Ranney Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Pratt pony truss bridge over Ausable River on Private Road
August 6, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: New photos
Dalton Covered Bridge 29-07-05 (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)
Covered Queenspost/Long through truss bridge over Warner River on Joppa Road West in Warner
August 6, 2017: New photos

Recent Comments 

Posted November 9, 2017

Well I'll be! I'd be curious if it was still lurking there since the entire segment of road was abandoned. Next time I make it down to Rockingham County I'll make sure to check up on it.

Posted November 8, 2017

I concur Royce, I can't find anything to line this up with either. I'd opt for junking the entry.

Posted November 1, 2017

Robert,

In my travels I've found quite a few Pin-connected railroad bridges where the first panel or two of the bottom chord is a built up compression member, so it was likely an original feature. I always figured it was due to the heavier/faster rolling stock that was expected where the last panels needed to handle compression forces. I've yet to see a highway bridge with this arrangement.

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/washington/bh61006/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/grafton/connecticut-river/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/grafton/rr-connecticut-river/

Schell Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted November 1, 2017

Townsfolk got their options for what kind of boring prefabricated bridge they want to replace the historic bridge...Looks like they want an arch bridge:

http://www.recorder.com/State-presents-8-design-options-for-...

Missing is option #9 to recognize the historic value of this bridge and to rehabilitate and preserve it.

Posted October 27, 2017

Julie, you can count me in for any projects up here in New England! I can think of quite a few gems that need restoration/preservation up here, and I'd be happy to team up to make sure we don't loose 'em!

Posted October 27, 2017

This was a fascinating bridge to visit, as this had signs of quite a interesting past. Originally built as a 2 span bridge, when its central pier was washed out in the 1890s it had a arch added and became a single span. It looks like they also rebuilt the truss to make this work, as the compression members in the middle of the bridge were turned around so they would appropriately transfer the load as a single span, instead of being its designed 2 span. When the arch was deleted and the pier re-added in the 50's they re-corrected the compression members, restoring it to a 2 span orientation. You can see signs of this in photos 45, 46, and 47, where empty slots indicate that the diagonal compression members in the middle panels were previously oriented in the opposite direction.

Bridge comment
Posted October 26, 2017

Or people could, you know, stop posting copyrighted images? That would be a win-win for stopping the debate and keeping us out of trouble

Bridge Photos and Copyright
Posted October 26, 2017

Right on the main page it says that it isn't a search engine and that you shouldn't assume that the returned images are under a CC license. I don't think its a good idea, given that the nature of this discussion is to AVOID copyright infringement, to tout it as "100% copyright-free photos"

Slick Bridge
Posted October 26, 2017

How was it 'sourced' and 'licensed'? Who did you get consent from? There were two different sources for the pictures you used.

Posted October 26, 2017

If you actually bothered to read the article from the newsite that you stole these pictures from you'd have realized that this is not the Slick Bridge, but the Mores Creek Bridge.

http://bridgehunter.com/id/ada/12815/

Posted October 25, 2017

A couple of problems here:

This is not a Pratt truss. This is a concrete stringer bridge with a wooden cover added. The internal truss is patterned on a Multiple Kingspost system, but that is merely for decoration. The previous bridge lost in Irene was the same deal, being a 1930's steel stringer with a faux wooden cover added in 1970.

There was mention of having a height and weight restriction? The National Bridge Inventory says that this bridge is open with no restrictions, and there is no signage around this bridge indicating one. The previous one did, but not this one.

Posted October 25, 2017

Violating copyrights isn't just a 'big deal' to the Historic Bridges team, you'll find most of this community here at Bridge Hunter sensitive to it as well. Finding your work on a different site without permission is incredibly frustrating, especially given the time and money we expend traveling and documenting these bridges.

And what "image repository" site are you referring to/using? I have only found Nathans pictures of this bridge hosted by his own website in my search, so I'm curious as to where these are illegally re-posted.

Posted October 24, 2017

#1 was taken from the bridge company's webpage itself:

http://www.sibc.ca/media/_wd2-x7z9152/

#3 was taken from someones blog

http://ontheroadwiththeroses.blogspot.com/2012/06/day-81-ott...

Posted October 24, 2017

Image number 1 was taken from the American Engineering Website:

http://american-ea.com/south-norfolk-jordan-bridge/

Image number 2 was taken from the Virginian-Pilot website.

https://pilotonline.com/news/local/transportation/traffic/to...

protip: re-posting pictures as yours that you find in a Google search is NOT ok

Posted October 16, 2017

Melissa/Robert:

Its a pretty mixed bag, with both variations in policy depending on what state you are in and what time it was done and the location/traffic of the bridge. For example in the 60's and early 70's it was very common in my home state of Vermont to add steel supports or even remove the entire bottom of the bridge and replace it with and independent steel and concrete bridge, retaining the authentic cover. At the time this was seen as progressive, but by the late 70's and 80's the sentiment moved more towards in-kind restoration and preservation. Today we have a comprehensive policy towards rehabilitation and maintenance of covered bridges that keeps them working as their original framers intended.

Cross over the Connecticut river into New Hampshire and there are only a handful of covered bridges with steel supports. Most of them were modified way back in the early 1900's with the addition of large laminated wooden arches. These modifications are old enough to be historic in their own right, and look more 'natural' then steel supports. Fortunately these arches strengthened them sufficiently to survive without further modification.

Certainly though it can be said that more covered bridges have been modified then any of us would like to see. I feel like there has been an increase in awareness for historic integrity of covered bridges though, so hopefully we won't see more of these modifications in the future.