Michael Quiet

About Me 

Email: mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com

My only regret is that it took me so long to realize how much I loved bridges.

It seems like a lot of folks on here had their realization early on in life that they had an affinity for the subtle beauty of bridges. Me? Not so much. I always had a fascination with bridges growing up, primarily covered bridges. However it was merely a passing interest in their historical nature, concepts like differing truss styles never even occurring to me. I would always go out of my way to see covered bridges however, and it was a daily delight that my daily commute to college required crossing a covered bridge

During my college years for my photography course I did a segment on bridges, cataloging what are now to me gems, such as Vermont’s longest Paddleford Truss covered bridge, the Sanborn Bridge in Lyndonville, VT. Again though, my interest was primarily in the bridges historical nature and all the details of the bridge otherwise being lost on me.

Then one day in the summer of 2013 everything changed.

I was driving in northeastern Vermont, just cruising about. On the Vermont roadmap there was a historical marker in Highgate falls for a “parabolic bridge”. I was close by, and I was curious what a parabolic bridge was, so we made course for the small town. My minds eye determined that this “parabolic” bridge was some modern creation, as a shape like that is never something I would expect to be old.

While driving along I spotted an old bypassed metal bridge, and decided to stop. As I approached the bridge it dawned on me that it was unlike any old metal bridge I had ever seen, as it wasn’t trapezoidal like all the other bridges I was used to. It then dawned on me, admiring the distinctive upper and lower chords, that this was the parabolic bridge that I was searching for. As I began to cross the bridge I looked up at the Berlin Iron Bridge Co. builders plaque, I was stopped by the build date: 1887

How could such an beautiful, gracefully elegant, and complicated bridge have been built in 1887? It didn’t make any sense to me at the time (Mind you I grew up in Vermont, where covered bridges continued to be constructed well into the early 1900’s, so I had no experience with early iron bridges). I became obsessed with this bridge, slowly learning the distinctions of the truss type, concepts such as pin-connected versus riveted, and terms such as “hangers” and “chords”.

Since then my life hasn't been the same. As I learned of the lenticular truss I had to learn about other trusses (as the lenticular truss can employ either Pratt or Warren webbing), and my interest branched out to the truss bridges. I now enjoy investigating and cataloging all types of truss bridges, metal or wooden with a mostly equal level, with a continued special interest in the lenticular truss.

Happy bridge hunting!

Favorite Photos 

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Bardwell's Ferry Bridge

Bardwell's Ferry Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Eastern approach

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Grantville Road Bridge

Grantville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Looking at the 1886 lenticular warren truss

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Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge

Old Elm Ridge Road Bridge (Jefferson County, New York)
View from downstream

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Janice Peaslee Bridge

Janice Peaslee Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)

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South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge

South Washington Street Parabolic Bridge (Broome County, New York)
Southern portal

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Kinderhook Creek Bridge

Kinderhook Creek Bridge (Columbia County, New York)
Looking at the bridge from upstream

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Water Street Bridge

Water Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Overview

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Pine Street Bridge

Pine Street Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
Eastern portal

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Mosley Bridge

Moseley Bridge (Bennington County, Vermont)

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Town Line Bridge

Town Line Bridge (Cortland County, New York)
View from the riverbed

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Keeseville Suspension Bridge

Keeseville Suspension Bridge (Essex County, New York)

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Green Iron Bridge

Green Iron Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Overview, from route 30

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Pineground Bridge

Pineground Bridge (Merrimack County, New Hampshire)
Overview

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The Shea Bridge

Shea Bridge (Providence County, Rhode Island)
Overview

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Yaleville Road Bridge

Yaleville Road Bridge (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Profile of the 1892 Lenticular through truss

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Livermore Falls Bridge

Livermore Falls Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
The surviving river span as seen from the river, looking north towards the old Mill site

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Hadley Bow Bridge

Hadley Bow Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Profile of the last remaining example of a lenticular half-through (semi-deck) lenticular truss bridge, fabricated in 1885 by Berlin Iron Bridge Co.

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Delage Farm Road Bridge

Iron Furnace Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Looking at the bridge from the river side of the park.

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Ruhle Road Bridge

Ruhle Road Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)
Southern approach

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Aiken Street Bridge

Aiken Street Bridge (Middlesex County, Massachusetts)

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Vischers Ferry Bridge

Vischers Ferry Bridge (Saratoga County, New York)

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Recent Updates 

River Road Bridge (Orleans County, Vermont)
Lost Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Missisquoi River on River Road
January 21, 2018: Added
Hermanville Road Bridge (Orleans County, Vermont)
Lost Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Black River on Hermanville Road
January 21, 2018: Added
Dorr Bridge (Rutland County, Vermont)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Otter Creek on Dorr Drive
January 21, 2018: Added
West Canada Creek (Fifth) (Herkimer County, New York)
Lost Lenticular Through truss bridge over West Canada Creek on Bridge Street
December 28, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted truss type and builder
Viall Street Bridge (Old) (Saratoga County, New York)
Lost Lenticular pony truss bridge over Anthony Kill (Tenandaho creek) on Viall Ave.
December 28, 2017: Added
Willsboro Bridge (Essex County, New York)
Lost Lenticular through truss bridge over Bouquet River on Route 22
December 27, 2017: Added
Whippleville Bridge (Franklin County, New York)
Lost Lenticular pony truss bridge over Salmon River on River Road
December 26, 2017: Added
Pearl Street Bridge (Franklin County, New York)
Lost Lenticular through truss bridge over Little Salmon River on Pearl Street
December 26, 2017: Added
Center Street Bridge (Franklin County, New York)
Lost Lenticular through truss bridge over Little Salmon River on Center Street
December 26, 2017: Added
Dog Hollow Bridge (Franklin County, New York)
Lost Lenticular pony truss bridge over Little Salmon River on Dog Hollow Road
December 20, 2017: Added
Yancey Road Bridge (Frio County, Texas)
Lenticular through truss bridge over Pond/Tehuacana Creek on Private Road
December 17, 2017: New photos
RUT - Lake Champlain Drawbridge (Addison Branch) (Addison County, Vermont)
Lost Pontoon swing bridge over Lake Champlain on Rutland Railroad
December 12, 2017: Added
RUT - Burleigh Trestle (Addison Branch) (Addison County, Vermont)
Lost Timber stringer bridge over Lake Champlain on Rutland Railroad
December 12, 2017: Added
Blue Cut Bridge (Wayne County, New York)
Lost Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Rochester & Syracuse Railroad on New York Central Railroad
December 8, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Corrected truss type to Pennsylvania from Parker
Pratts Landing Bridge (Lewis County, New York)
Lost Pratt through & swing truss bridge over Black River on Burdicks Crossing Road
November 22, 2017: Added
Twin Bridge (north) (Oneida County, New York)
Pin connected Pratt pony truss bridge over Black River on River Road
November 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that bridge was replaced
Twin Bridge (south) (Oneida County, New York)
Pin connected Pratt pony truss bridge over Black River on River Road
November 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added builder. Noted that bridge was replaced
Abandonded NYC (Gouverneur and Oswegatchie branch) - Oswegatchie River Bridge #2 (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Abandoned triple-intersection lattice through truss bridge over Oswegatchie River on New York Central Railroad
November 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added builder info
Abandonded NYC (Gouverneur and Oswegatchie branch) - Oswegatchie River Bridge #1 (St. Lawrence County, New York)
Abandoned triple-intersection lattice through truss bridge over West Branch Oswegatchie River on New York Central Railroad
November 21, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added builder info
Jonesville Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Lost Parker through truss bridge over Winooski River on C2003
November 10, 2017: Added
Holyoke-South Hadley Bridge (Hampden County, Massachusetts)
Lost Triple-Intersection Lattice Through truss bridge over Connecticut River on MA-116
November 3, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Added history, truss type, and builder info
Bennett Meadow Bridge (Franklin County, Massachusetts)
Lost Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Great Meadow Road
November 1, 2017: Added
Stark Covered Bridge 29-04-05 (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Paddleford truss bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River on North or Northside Road (off of SR 110) in Stark
October 27, 2017: New photos
Sequin Bridge 45-04-02 (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Covered Burr arch-truss bridge over Lewis Creek on Roscoe Road
October 27, 2017: New photos
Queeche Covered Bridge 45-14-A #2 (Windsor County, Vermont)
Covered concrete beam bridge over Ottauquechee River on Waterman Hill Road
October 25, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Removed Pratt truss; This is a concrete stringer. Removed reference to height/weight restrictions. Imported NBI data
WACR - Passumpsic River Bridge #8 (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Baltimore through truss bridge over Passumpsic River on Washington County Railroad
October 8, 2017: New photo
Beards Bridge (Grafton County, New Hampshire)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Connecticut River on North Monroe Road
October 2, 2017: Added
Joels Bridge (Carroll County, New Hampshire)
Lost Covered Paddleford through truss bridge over Saco River
October 2, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Filled out info & history of bridge
Suffield-Thompsonville Bridge (Hartford County, Connecticut)
Lost Parker through truss bridge over Connecticut River on Main Street
September 29, 2017: Added
Jackman Road-Austin Stream (Old) (Somerset County, Maine)
Lost Lenticular pony truss bridge over Austin Stream on Jackman Road
September 27, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that this was a lenticular pony; Moved pin to historic bridge location.
Lower Waterford Bridge (old) (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Paddleford through truss bridge over Mad Brook on Lower Waterford Road
September 22, 2017: Added
John's Bridge (Franklin County, Vermont)
Lost Double-intersection Warren through truss bridge over Missisquoi River on Old alignment of Route 7
September 22, 2017: Added
South Main Street Bridge (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Concrete tee beam bridge over Sleepers River on Main Street
September 17, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: This bridge has been demolished
LVRC - Bridge No. 54 (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Abandoned stone arch bridge over Stream on Lamoille Valley Railroad
September 17, 2017: New photos
Jeffersonville Route 108 Bridge (Lamoille County, Vermont)
Pratt through truss bridge over Lamoille River on VT 108 in Jeffersonville
September 8, 2017: New photo
West Milton Bridge (Chittenden County, Vermont)
Relocated Pennsylvania through truss bridge over Lamoille River on C3040
September 8, 2017: New photo
Williams River I-91 SB Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Warren deck truss with all verticals bridge over Williams River/GMRC RR on I-91SB
September 6, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted that bridge is scheduled for demolition and replacement
Williams River I-91 NB Bridge (Windham County, Vermont)
Lost Warren deck truss with all verticals bridge over Williams River/GMRCRR on I-91 NB
September 6, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: This bridge has been demolished. Replacement in progress
Creekside Trail - Farm Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Lewis Creek on Trail / Farm Path
September 5, 2017: Added
Creekside Trail - Farm Bridge (Addison County, Vermont)
Warren pony truss with alternating verticals bridge over Lewis Creek on Trail / Farm Path
September 5, 2017: New photos
BM - Lindsley Bridge (old) (Caledonia County, Vermont)
Lost Town lattice truss bridge over Passumpsic River on Boston & Maine Railroad
August 25, 2017: Added
PRRT - BMS Railway Overpass (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Plate Girder Bridge over Berlin Mills Railway on PRRT
August 23, 2017: Added
Mason Street Bridge (older) (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Lost Lenticular through truss bridge over Androscoggin River on Mason Street
August 23, 2017: Added
Samuel Paine Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Lost Paddleford through truss bridge over Androscoggin River
August 23, 2017: Added
Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned Whipple through truss bridge
August 23, 2017: New photos
NHCR - Upper Ammonoosuc River Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Through truss bridge over Upper Ammonoosuc River on New Hampshire Central Railroad
August 23, 2017: New photos
Abandoned BMS - Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned bridge over Androscoggin River on Berlin Mills Railway
August 23, 2017: New photos
Berlin Mills Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Pratt through truss bridge over Androscoggin River in Berlin
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted designer and builder. Added pictures
Berlin Mills Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Pratt through truss bridge over Androscoggin River in Berlin
August 22, 2017: Updated by Michael Quiet: Noted designer and builder. Added pictures
Abandoned BMS - Pulp Mill Bridge (Coos County, New Hampshire)
Abandoned bridge over Androscoggin River on Berlin Mills Railway
August 22, 2017: Added

Recent Comments 

Posted January 18, 2018

If my eyes don't deceive me that looks like a Truesdell truss. The design & details look pretty close to the remaining example up in NH:

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/belknap/tilton-island-park/

Fort River Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted January 4, 2018

It looks more like the bypass date is wrong. Checking with the topographical maps it shows this bridge as the crossing until the 1939 topo. In the 1941 topo the bridge is still indicated, but has been bypassed with the current alignment. It looks like the original bypass bridge was replaced in 1965. It would be correct then to indicate that this bridge was bypassed c. 1940

It therefore seems highly unlikely this structure saw any trolley service. From what I can tell the Amherst Sunderland Street Railway only came into existence in 1896, which is well after this bridge was fabricated. And given its light build it doesn't seem suited for trolley service (and would also explain the earlier bypass date).

Here's a nice history of the trolley system:

https://www.amherstma.gov/DocumentCenter/Home/View/18695

Posted December 17, 2017

A big thank you to Spicer Sigman for providing photos and for the tremendous effort in saving this beauty. The fact that it was hot riveted during its restoration goes well beyond what we see in most restorations.

Hats off to you sir!

Posted December 8, 2017

The bridge might already have been removed before '36. It looks like the preferred crossing for the MEC became the current bridge at Fairfield when that was built in 1916, making the crossing in question redundant. I haven't been able to find any info on its fate though

Posted December 6, 2017

It sounds like it might have been shortened to fit this crossing, as that would explain the extra bridge parts lying around. That would also explain why this only has 1 set of counters (if it was the first panel of a longer pratt pony), and also why its disproportionately tall for being such a short span.

Jeremy, if you can ever snag a picture or two of that parts pile that would surely help with figuring out the story behind this. In any event its certainly a neat little bridge!

Posted December 5, 2017

Robert,

In a Queenpost layout, the diagonals aren't critical to overall function of the bridge, so you can get away with a configuration like this. Without them, the verticals act solely in tension for supporting the load applied to the deck. It creates a more uneven application of stress to the endposts like this, but it still works fine. Quite a few covered Queenposts have empty center panels as well.

I wish my driveway had one of these :)

Posted November 24, 2017

For Maine this might actually count as 'preservation', as the bridge is still mostly intact. Generally they are imploded and sent off to the scrapheap. At least there is still a option of rehabilitation/reuse right now, although given the states approach for historic bridges I'd say the chances are negligible and this will eventually be scrapped or just rust away

Its a shame, this would make a great pedestrian bridge. And there are only about a dozen of these American Bridge/United Construction Co. structures left.

Posted November 9, 2017

Well I'll be! I'd be curious if it was still lurking there since the entire segment of road was abandoned. Next time I make it down to Rockingham County I'll make sure to check up on it.

Posted November 8, 2017

I concur Royce, I can't find anything to line this up with either. I'd opt for junking the entry.

Posted November 1, 2017

Robert,

In my travels I've found quite a few Pin-connected railroad bridges where the first panel or two of the bottom chord is a built up compression member, so it was likely an original feature. I always figured it was due to the heavier/faster rolling stock that was expected where the last panels needed to handle compression forces. I've yet to see a highway bridge with this arrangement.

http://bridgehunter.com/vt/washington/bh61006/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/grafton/connecticut-river/

http://bridgehunter.com/nh/grafton/rr-connecticut-river/

Schell Bridge (Massachusetts)
Posted November 1, 2017

Townsfolk got their options for what kind of boring prefabricated bridge they want to replace the historic bridge...Looks like they want an arch bridge:

http://www.recorder.com/State-presents-8-design-options-for-...

Missing is option #9 to recognize the historic value of this bridge and to rehabilitate and preserve it.

Posted October 27, 2017

Julie, you can count me in for any projects up here in New England! I can think of quite a few gems that need restoration/preservation up here, and I'd be happy to team up to make sure we don't loose 'em!

Posted October 27, 2017

This was a fascinating bridge to visit, as this had signs of quite a interesting past. Originally built as a 2 span bridge, when its central pier was washed out in the 1890s it had a arch added and became a single span. It looks like they also rebuilt the truss to make this work, as the compression members in the middle of the bridge were turned around so they would appropriately transfer the load as a single span, instead of being its designed 2 span. When the arch was deleted and the pier re-added in the 50's they re-corrected the compression members, restoring it to a 2 span orientation. You can see signs of this in photos 45, 46, and 47, where empty slots indicate that the diagonal compression members in the middle panels were previously oriented in the opposite direction.

Bridge comment
Posted October 26, 2017

Or people could, you know, stop posting copyrighted images? That would be a win-win for stopping the debate and keeping us out of trouble

Bridge Photos and Copyright
Posted October 26, 2017

Right on the main page it says that it isn't a search engine and that you shouldn't assume that the returned images are under a CC license. I don't think its a good idea, given that the nature of this discussion is to AVOID copyright infringement, to tout it as "100% copyright-free photos"