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Dillerville Yard Footbridge

Photo 

Looking Ahead

Photo taken by "pooleside" on Panoramio

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View this photo at panoramio.com

BH Photo #225187

Map 

Street View 

Description 

Jan. 12, 2015 article:

Built in 1922, the 280-foot-long, steel bridge allowed Armstrong workers to cross the Dillerville rail yard to walk to and from work. Later, Franklin & Marshall College students and residents used the bridge to access athletic fields and neighborhoods. With the rail lines now gone, current plans by Lancaster General Health and Franklin & Marshall College are to dismantle and relocate the bridge to a hiking trail. Its current position conflicts with plans for a stadium. The Historic Trust and former Lancaster Mayor Art Morris object to moving the bridge to a site without historical context. Morris said the bridge was an integral part of Lancaster's industrial, urban landscape, and its future should be studied and then discussed at public forums. He hopes the college and LGH are open to a second look. "It won't stop any imminent work if they hold up on it," Morris said. Officials said the bridge has not been deemed eligible for listing on the historic register.

Facts 

Overview
Warren through truss bridge over Dillerville Yard on Pedestrian Pathway
Location
Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Status
Intact but closed to all traffic; scheduled for removal March 2015
Future prospects
Planned for removal and reuse
History
Built ca.1922; scheduled for removal 2015
Design
Warren through truss
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.05125, -76.31686   (decimal degrees)
40°03'05" N, 76°19'01" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/387675/4434276 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Lancaster
Inventory number
BH 51258 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • January 13, 2015: Updated by Alexander D. Mitchell IV: Corrected error: Bridge not yet removed; scheduled for removal March 2015 according to article linked
  • January 5, 2015: Updated by Luke: Bridge removed: planned for reuse
  • February 15, 2014: New Street View added by Luke Harden
  • February 10, 2012: Added by Daniel Hopkins

Sources