Rating:
2 votes

Enola Low Grade Trail - Quarryville Overpass

Photos 

South Portal of 222 overpass

view looking North

Photo taken by Sean McDonnell in March 2009

Enlarge

BH Photo #204054

Map 

Street View 

Description 

A stone arch bridge with a low-dip in the road to allow for large trucks to pass underneath.

Facts 

Overview
Stone arch bridge over US 222 on Enola Low Grade Trail
Location
Quarryville, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Status
Removed
History
Built 1904, Removed in 2009
Railroads
- Conrail (CR)
- Penn Central Railroad (PC)
- Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR)
- Rail-to-trail
Design
Stone arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 24.0 ft.
Total length: 27.9 ft.
Also called
PRR - Quarryville Overpass
PC - Quarryville Overpass
Conrail Bridge - Quarryville Overpass
Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.89858, -76.18002   (decimal degrees)
39°53'55" N, 76°10'48" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/399123/4417166 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Quarryville
Inventory numbers
PA 36 0222 0320 0204 (Pennsylvania Bridge Management System number)
BH 41624 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • January 13, 2012: Updated by Alexander D. Mitchell IV: Changed name to lessen confusion
  • July 13, 2011: Updated by Daniel Hopkins: Added city, categories, and a small description
  • July 13, 2011: New Street View added by Jason Smith
  • July 12, 2011: Updated by Sean McDonnell: updated status to "removed", corrected map location.

Sources 

  • Sean McDonnell
  • Jason Smith - flensburg [dot] bridgehunter [dot] av [at] googlemail [dot] com
  • Daniel Hopkins - chimera [at] clovermail [dot] net
  • Alexander D. Mitchell IV

Comments 

Enola Low Grade Trail - Quarryville Overpass
Posted September 23, 2015, by Clayton (gib9230 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Yeah, it allowed for large trucks to pass beneath, but thereby restricted traffic to one lane while they (slowly) passed through. Also, it was anyone's guess if those traveling in the opposite direction would know the rules of driving would yield. Given the number of people who drive 30-40 on this 55mph stretch of road, that's quite the assumption for drivers in this area. Glad it's gone.

Want to see the stones? Walk on the Rail Trail--they are nice decoration.

PRR Quarryville Overpass
Posted July 30, 2013, by Anonymous the Spartan (Anonymous [at] spartan [dot] greece [dot] net)

Looks like somebody does not like Italians...you would think that by now we would have left racist epithets in our past.

Whether you are from Athens, Sparta, or Rome, we are all people.

PRR Quarryville Overpass
Posted July 30, 2013, by Christina West (westy615 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge was removed in June 2009, not 2010. Although some were sad to see it go, it was an annoyance to have to slow down because of the narrowed lanes, and trying to proceed when a truck was in the opposing lane was unthinkable. There were many accidents at the site over the years, and it was right to remove it, hand-crafted by wop masons or not. It figures that lame Q-villians would obsess about something from 1904, which isn't that old at all. Also, so what about the stones, what are you going to do, eat them or decorate your living room with them? Are they holy? Can they raise the dead?

Conrail Bridge
Posted October 17, 2010, by Steven Hoffmeier (imagineir [at] aol [dot] com)

Google images map location is off by several miles, and the bridge/tunnel was removed in late 2009/early 2010...it no longer exsist, just as many of the other old Brown Stone PRR era tunnels have also been removed from the old Conrail Low Grade route between Atglen, PA and the Susquhanna River to the west. Norfolk Southern Railroad, the current owner of the "Low Grade" Right of Way, has sold off many parts for Rails to Trails projects, and the Bridges and Tunnels are too much of a liability.