Rating:
2 votes

Academia Covered Bridge 38-34-01

Photos 

Side view

Photo taken June 2006 by Jack Schmidt

BH Photo #108599

Map 

Description 

Interesting to note there are multiple documented dates for the bridge's build date: -1870 "Statewide Covered Bridge Assessment" -1901 "World Guide to Covered Bridges" -1902 "The Covered Bridges of Pennsylvania" by Zacher

Currently bridge is owned by the Juniata County of Historical Society

Facts 

Overview
Covered bridge over Tuscarora Creek southeast of Academia
Location
Juniata County, Pennsylvania
Status
Open to pedestrians only
History
Built 1902 by James M. Groniger
Design
Covered Burr arch-truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 135.0 ft.
Total length: 279.0 ft.
Deck width: 15.5 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 11.6 ft.
Recognition
Posted to the National Register of Historic Places on August 10, 1979
Also called
Pomeroy Covered Bridge (original name)
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.49350, -77.47267   (decimal degrees)
40°29'37" N, 77°28'22" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/290450/4485470 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Spruce Hill
Inventory numbers
WGCB 38-34-01 (World Guide to Covered Bridges number)
NRHP 79002249 (National Register of Historic Places reference number)
BH 31046 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • March 4, 2014: Photos imported by Dave King
  • August 21, 2012: New photos from Jodi Christman
  • July 28, 2012: Updated by Jodi Christman: Added description on dates and owner
  • December 18, 2006: Posted photos from Jack Schmidt

Sources 

Comments 

Academia Covered Bridge
Posted June 28, 2013, by Ron Martin (martinsrm [at] reagan [dot] com)

Although I cannot be certain, having not done any in-depth research on this particular bridge, it very likely may have originally been built in 1870. The structure matches the techniques of that time. In both 1898 and 1902 there were major floods in the Susquehanna watershed (and again in 1904, 1936, 1972, 1975, and 2011). It was common for these bridges to sustain enough damage to require a major repair/rebuild. There are other structures dating from those flood years in the watershed that fall into that category. Clifton Bridge (my "home bridge" here in Dauphin County) had a similar storied life. Built in 1822, it was heavily damaged by flood waters in 1862 (when the Union Canal dam burst at Water Works) and again in 1874. Some records mistakenly list it's build date as one of those two years - but those were actually a repair/rebuild of the original structure as opposed to a complete replacement. (Sadly, we lost it completely thanks to Agnes in 1972)

Academia Covered Bridge
Posted September 1, 2009, by A Hutchinson (alice,hutch [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I just came from visiting the reconstructed bridge,and felt the same peaceful feeling I had from the orginal bridge. I love it!