Recent Pennsylvania Comments

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Posted November 11, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

"They're coming to get you Barbara"...creeps me out every time.

Posted November 11, 2018, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Damn! Needing to watch NOFLD again. "They're dead...They're all messed up"...

Posted November 11, 2018, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Clark, now I have to rewatch the movie to see the bridge !

Posted November 10, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Dana and Kay along with Luke for the information identifying this bridge.Does anybody know if there are any plans for this bridge like a trail bridge,maybe?

Posted November 10, 2018, by Judi Booher (judidragonfly [dot] 54 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I need to know about bridges in the vicinity of Mount Union, Pa. When the first road bridge was constructed and out of what? Have found historical discrepancies...also there was a bridge at a place called Mine Bank where iron ore was mined, what kind of bridge crossed the Juniata for that mine?

Thank You,

Judi Booher

Posted November 10, 2018, by Judi Booher (judidragonfly [dot] 54 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I need to know about bridges in the vicinity of Mount Union, Pa. When the first road bridge was constructed and out of what? Have found historical discrepancies...

Thank You,

Judi Booher

Posted November 10, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

That's funny,Tommy!

Posted November 10, 2018, by Tommy Chong (baked [at] herb [dot] org)

Dave's not here, man.

Posted November 9, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Daniel,thanks for finding the bridge.That's the bridge I'm talking about on Google maps you located.Now that it's found,is there any information on it?

Posted November 9, 2018, by Daniel

https://goo.gl/maps/rTRFFbTwtPF2 I believe that's what you mean.

When I go to "add bridge" and insert those coordinates, I don't see it listed

If you know the location of a bridge, and enter it, one of the things listed on the right (with county, waterway, etc) is other bridges there. I see the two south of it (where you originally posted), but nothing where I just linked.

Posted November 9, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

No,Dana and kay.The bridge I'm talking about is between this one and the Koppel Bridge.It also crosses over this rail line.You can see it on satellite very easily.I don't know if i mentioned it but it's abandoned from what i see.

Posted November 9, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

George, This it?

Koppel Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted November 9, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I see an abandoned r.r. truss bridge over Beaver Run upriver from this bridge.Is this bridge on Bridgehunters?

Posted November 9, 2018, by Dexter Funkhouser

Dave? Where you at Buddy?

Koppel Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted November 9, 2018, by Kevin Morris (slufoot1 [at] zoominternet [dot] net)

A new bridge is currently being constructed beside this span.

Posted November 9, 2018, by Kevin Morris (slufoot1 [at] zoominternet [dot] net)

This bridge has been replaced with a newer span and is in service with Norfolk Southern Railway. It's now longer to span the widening of the Turnpike. It's been open for over a year now.

Posted November 9, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is a duplicate of the N/S Landis Ridge Tunnel entry.Actually the Landis Ridge Tunnel entry should be changed to N/S Perkasie Tunnel and this entry should be merged into that one because Septa service stopped on this rail line over 30 years ago.

Posted November 9, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is a duplicate of the tunnel listed under Septa Perkasie Tunnel.I know by seeing the location and also growing up in the area.It might be interesting to know this tunnel was originally owned by the Reading Railroad,then Conrail and now owned by N/S who doesn't use it but East Penn Railroad does to service Quakertown.

Posted November 8, 2018, by stillwondering

Duplicate?

Posted November 8, 2018, by justwondering?

duplicate?

Auburn Tunnel (Pennsylvania)
Posted November 8, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is the location on the map exactly where the tunnel is?I'm asking because I saw a video on YouTube that showed a location nowhere near where the location on the map is.

Posted November 8, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This is the tunnel I was looking for,luke and Dana and kay.Thanks Luke for finding this tunnel.

Posted November 8, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Dark when drove through today, but bridge has been replaced.

Posted November 7, 2018, by Dan Styer (Dan [dot] Styer [at] oberlin [dot] edu)

These photos show what was left of the bridge after the two-hurricane (Connie and Diane) flood of 19-20 August 1955. They were taken by Thomas W. Styer III (my father) in November 1955.

Posted November 7, 2018, by Dan Styer (Dan [dot] Styer [at] oberlin [dot] edu)

This photo was taken by Thomas W. Styer III (my father) in February 1961.

Posted November 6, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just read in today's paper that this bridge is reopened after damage to the height restriction bar was fixed.Goes to show how height restriction bars can come in handy when it comes to protecting both truss and covered bridges.By the way,the driver is still going to be cited and most likely have to pay for damages.

Posted November 4, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Culvert, road markings indicate replacement. Documented before even if just a culvert.

Posted November 2, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Read in this mornings local paper that this bridge is closed indefinitely due to a high profile truck hitting one of the height restriction barriers which also damaged the bridges abutments.The driver stopped and will be cited.As far as I know the covered bridge itself wasn't damaged.I'll let everybody know when I hear or read anything about this bridge.

Posted November 1, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I was reading today's paper and saw that Berks County is accepting sealed bids for a rehabilitation project on this bridge.The work to be performed is rehabilitation of the existing steel Pratt through-truss to a 10 ton load carrying capacity.The scope of repairs will include the replacement of members in kind with high strength steel in the truss and other components of the superstructure and floor system.The appropriate approach guiderail,transitions and end treatments will be installed at each corner to meet current PennDOT safety standards.The stone masonry substructure will be repointed as needed.I will let it be known when work will begin and post all information here.

Posted November 1, 2018, by ivan j. hook (capthook486 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have walked across that bridge many times over the years and even hitched a ride on the old slow B&O from Shippenville station to the airport at the 322 junction. i also have waded that creek and swam at Briners mill many times.Thanks for the photos, it brought back many good memories.

Posted October 30, 2018, by Doris (dionne [at] ptdprolog [dot] net)

I found at an auction a photo of the Lewisburg covered bridge with Lewisburg Tyrone Bellefonte Branch PRR photograph by Geo Bretz of Pottsville, Pa Negatives made May 14, 1890 No 31134-5. I wanted the frame, but now I am wondering about the photo since he was such a famous photgrapher. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.

Posted October 30, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Luke,if you or anybody can find out exactly where this bridge was located I'd be interested being that I lived and went to school in Lansdale Pa in Montgomery County.As for the Bethlehem branch I lived in Quakertown Pa that this branch ran through many years ago.This rail line is abandoned from north of Quakertown to Bethlehem Pa.There is rail on the ROW to Coopersburg where it ends and a trail begins.

Posted October 30, 2018, by Luke

George/Art, it ran from Philly to Bethlehem-ish.

So this could've been any major river between those two places.

Posted October 30, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Art for responding.I think this rail line is the forerunner of the Reading Railroad because the rail lines I saw are presently operated by SEPTA and N/S along with short line operators.I might be wrong.

Posted October 30, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks Art for responding.I think this rail line is the forerunner of the Reading Railroad because the rail lines I saw are presently operated by SEPTA and N/S along with short line operators.I might be wrong.

Posted October 30, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

George,

I'm not sure.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 29, 2018, by Anonymous

There’s a mention of Nathan’s website on DRJTBC’s page for this bridge.

Posted October 29, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It appears the bridge has a stone facing, but the Historic Bridge Inventory folks felt the stone facing dated to the 1919 construction of a stone arch, and they could not find any evidence that the original stone arch remained. The inventory comments follow:

The bridge carries a two-lane, brick-paved street and sidewalks over a creek on the Ambridge-Leetsdale line. The setting does not have historic district potential. There are modern buildings at the NW quadrant in Leetsdale, and the 1916 brick building beyond the NE quadrant has altered storefronts. There are highly altered buildings in Ambridge and a 1920s electrical substation beyond the SE quadrant. The area does not have consistency or cohesiveness.

The well-proportioned, one span, reinforced concrete arch bridge built in 1919 and reportedly incorporating an 1827 stone arch (not visible at all) is finished with rusticated ashlar spandrel walls and wingwalls. The arch ring is accented with vermiculated ring stones. The roadway is inclined across, so the paneled stone parapets are stepped. The bridge exhibits the same fine masonry as the earlier stone arch bridges built by the county. It is an example of a bridge type and design that are common in the county, and neither the bridge nor its setting are historically or technologically significant.

Posted October 29, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

any one know if there is 1827 stone arch Under Concrete here?

Watts Mill Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 29, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

In-kind restoration differs from rehab in our work. The funds, up to 500k, reflect that our expertises can do this work for about 1/3 less than engineer's estimates. We spent the last four months figuring out real costs for restoration of this rare Penn Bridge Co. structure, making choices with a group of interested locals who started in January trying to figure it out. We were asked to step in and see what we could do in June. Our goals then, fund a site visit and work on final ownership by the county who found that insurances, inspections and maintenance were not a big financial risk. What sealed it was bridgehunter research that showed so few Penn bridges left in Beaver County, we offered to bundle with Fallston....no doubt that bridge is next but this one is almost contracted. Visit the notary today. It wasn't easy, none of them are, but our industry partners, Bach and SGI, know what they are doing.

Watts Mill Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 27, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Dave AWSOME news. Thanks for saving!

Watts Mill Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 27, 2018, by Dave Holoweiko (dholoweiko [at] gmail [dot] com)

just wanted to let everyone know the old girl has been saved through lots of hard work by many people. Workin bridges purchased it at auction it will be taken apart and shipped to Bach Steel and rehabbed brought back in the spring and put back in place and opened as a pedestrian bridge with Penndot covering rehab costs and Beaver County taking ownership. Thanks to everyone involved we saved this historic bridge.

Hodgens Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 27, 2018, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

How easy would it be to straighten out this road and leave the historic bridge in place?

Apparently too complicated for PennDOT!

Hodgens Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 27, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

DOOMED

https://observer-reporter.com/news/localnews/she-has-a-bridg...

She has a bridge over Buffalo Creek she'd like to sell you

Barbara Miller May 17, 2018

Lisa Cessna has never been to Brooklyn, but she has a bridge she wants to sell you.

How’d you like to be the new owner of the Hodgens Bridge over Buffalo Creek at Walker Hill Road near Taylorstown in bucolic Washington County?

With a mere three-ton weight limit, county officials know the Hodgens Bridge needs to be replaced, according to Cessna, who, as executive director of the Washington County Planning Commission, oversees county bridges.

“We’re trying to mitigate the loss of a historic structure,” Cessna said this week.

The new owner can’t buy the bridge and set up a tollbooth. The bridge will have to be moved.

If it’s still standing somewhere next year, the Hodgens Bridge will reach the ripe old age of 130, predating mass production of the automobile.

The sale is being advertised on a PennDOT website until August. If no one’s shopping for a span, the county has permission to demolish it.

It’s safe to say it has outlived those who built it. According to the “Historic Bridges” website, Hodgens was constructed by Penn Bridge Co. of Beaver Falls, Beaver County.

“Historic metal truss bridges are an important part of Pennsylvania’s industrial heritage,” wrote Howard Pollman, director for the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission’s external affairs, in response to an email inquiry.

“Unfortunately, modern traffic needs and a lack of maintenance funding have accelerated the loss of these bridges in recent years, with over 50 percent of the population of metal truss bridges being lost since 2001.

“In an effort to preserve these bridges, PennDOT, in concert with the State Historic Preservation Office, have developed a management plan that includes marketing metal truss bridges that can no longer meet the needs of their crossing.”

Interested in both preservation and serving the needs of the modern traveling public, the state Historical and Museum Commission gave Washington County some leeway in dealing with a pair of its old bridges.

The county proposed a deal: It would save the Potter Bridge, also known as the Robinson Run Road Bridge in West Finley Township, and move it to a new walking and biking trail being developed at Cross Creek County Park near West Middletown. The Potter Bridge, built in 1881, is also considered a historic structure.

“We offered to add the Hodgens Bridge to PennDOT’s marketing website in hopes of finding a new owner who could adaptively reuse the bridge,” Pollman wrote.

Washington County agreed and the bridge is currently on the website https://www.paprojectpath.org/penndot-crm/bridges/bridges-fo....

The bridge is referred to as the Walker Hill Road Bridge on the website.

For bridge aficionados, the “Historic Bridges” website describes the Hodgens Bridge as a metal, seven-panel, pin-connected Pratt through truss.

Cessna looked into disassembling the Hodgens Bridge, and, because of its 100-foot length, the cost would be about $700,000.

“That one’s a really big structure,” she said. “If there are no takers, we’re then allowed to demolish it and move on.”

Offers for the bridge are being accepted until Aug. 15.

Posted October 26, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and kay,I was just talking to my fiancee who told me that there was a farm down by the river on the other side of the arch bridge at one time years ago which leads me to believe that's why the arch bridge is there.I looked on satellite and saw a building that looks like possibly a house in the woods by the river.When I get a chance I'll look at the area when down there.

Posted October 26, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Street view ,"Aim abled" again. Thanks James! added second street view

Posted October 25, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Art,where was this bridge located?I lived in Montgomery county and know most of the county very well.Any information would be appreciated.

Posted October 25, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Not sure where this one is but its an 1850's cast iron deck truss Whipple! Very cool!

Posted October 25, 2018, by Luke

Nice find Art!

North Pennsylvania was a precursor to the Reading from Philly to Bethlehem or thereabouts, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Pennsylvania_Railroad

Posted October 21, 2018, by Anonymous

This is a NS RR bridge that is in use AFAIK

W Maiden St Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 19, 2018, by Anonymous
Posted October 17, 2018, by Janis T Ford (jford3 [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

10/4/18 Local told us the bridge was to be torn down, but it was deemed to be a historic landmark, so it was saved.

Posted October 17, 2018, by Janis T Ford (jford3 [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

10/4/18 - This bridge was gone. Road construction in progress, so not clear if it is gone for good, for just MIA for the time being.

Posted October 17, 2018, by Janis T Ford (jford3 [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

During our visit a couple of weeks ago, we spoke to a man living in the area. He told us the bridge was about to be removed, taken away & refurbished, brought back & restored. Apparently the community center & the bridge use the same concrete support. This concrete is not strong enough to support the increased weight & will crumble. Therefore, the community center must go.

He told us there are only 2 remaining bridges like this one & that it is the only 1 still in service.

Posted October 16, 2018, by Bill (Greenejct [at] gmail [dot] com)

1st Photo of suspension bridge is looking "west" towards New Haven, the former name of the westside of Connellsville, PA. Crawford Ave. or Main St. is behind the photographer.

Posted October 15, 2018, by Luke

It seems like some of the spans of further variants (Such as the later (Linville-Piper Whipple) may have been reused.

Two deck spans from Steubenville were reused as a road bridge in Pittsburgh ( https://bridgehunter.com/pa/allegheny/bh83120/), and John and I have already documented several of the spans of the Illinois Central's original Dubuque bridge were relocated, though none of the Linville ones seem to exist, with most being replaced ( https://bridgehunter.com/ia/linn/coggon/; https://bridgehunter.com/ia/linn/bh60489/ ) or some being lost to flooding ( https://bridgehunter.com/wi/green/bh81901/ ).

Additionally, there was a Linville truss at Painesville, Ohio that was the basis for someone's graduating thesis at the State University of New York, but there's no reference to the line using it.

( https://books.google.com/books?id=gDgdAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA316&dq=g... )

Posted October 15, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I believe that Mead Ave ( http://bridgehunter.com/pa/crawford/mead-avenue/ )is the only bridge still in existence that fully conforms to this patent (I suspect it also has the shortest spans of the design). The Valley Road Bridge on the Stewartstown Railroad ( http://bridgehunter.com/pa/york/valley-road/ ) is close but is a Pratt pony and the lower cord and its connections may be different.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted October 15, 2018, by Luke

Here's a ASCE scan of a plate showing the design of a Linville variant.

Moxham Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 14, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The Moxham Historic District is located directly south of this bridge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moxham_Historic_District

Posted October 13, 2018, by Luke
Posted October 13, 2018, by Anonymous

Does anyone know what that huge polygonal through truss in the background of some of these photos is?

Posted October 13, 2018, by Anonymous

This entry is for the tunnel itself, which is wholly in Westmoreland County.

Posted October 13, 2018, by Ed Patterson (indparks [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bow Ridge Tunnel Bridge was actually located in Indiana County, PA not Westmoreland County.

Moxham Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted October 12, 2018, by Anonymous

Huh

Posted October 11, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

http://www.ompsfuneralhome.com/obituary/richard-lee-stevens/

A relative worked for him many years ago & mentioned him in a story I remembered. I saw the comment when Brian posted his photos & I asked my relative if this was the same guy & they said yes. We looked up the obit on google.

Posted October 3, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Thanks for the compliment,Dana and Kay.I'll get down that way after the new year and check this arch bridge out.It puzzles the hell out of me being that there might have possibly been a road there at one time.

Posted October 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Did the same street view digging, Certainly Appears to be masonry arch, Wonder if road went to river at one point. good find George!

Posted October 2, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and Kay,This is the right location.You have the street view which helps.If you go back up Circle Rd and look to the left you can see the arch bridge down the stone path.Also it has a gate on it so I don't know why it's gated.You can see the gate if you enlarge the picture on street view.Sure looks like one well built bridge from what I see.

Posted October 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Cant aim the street view like previous, but looks like Its there

Posted October 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Think I got it.

Posted October 2, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Dana and kay,the arch bridge is actually on the other side of the electric substation on Broad St.On the other side of the electric substation the road turns into Circle Rd.That's where the arch bridge is.Follow the railroad tracks toward reading and you'll see it.What you are actually looking at is an access road for N/S.

Posted October 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

George, Here?

Posted October 2, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

One NS Arch

Posted September 25, 2018, by Dan Milam (dan [dot] milam [at] att [dot] net)

Found these photographs in a book.

Posted September 19, 2018, by ....justsayin

Hyner Bridge October 1930

Posted September 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

it was.

Posted September 18, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Photo #3 looks like a different bridge.

Posted September 15, 2018, by George Oakley (Georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As per an article printed on 9-14-18 in the Reading Eagle this bridge will reopen in May of 2019,not November of 2018 as originally planned which means that this project took a year to complete,not 6 months.During excavation,crews discovered the soil would not provide the desired bearing capacity to support the footers for the new bridge.Alfred A. Picca,pennDOT assistant district executive for construction,said in a press release."This requires some additional design work,as well as having the contractor constructing subfooters to provide additional support for the bridge".This project cost nearly $2.5 million.Detours are still in place.

Posted September 7, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just saw on ABC channel 6 t.v. out of Philadelphia that this bridge is reopened and that repairs are done.

Posted September 5, 2018, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Being disassembled and moved to Elizabethtown for preservation:

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=412121495982893&...

Posted September 5, 2018, by Don Morrison

It may also be in red in the map on this page, but it's difficult to tell for sure.

Scottdale had both passenger and freight stations at the time, so maybe the passenger trains followed this ROW? Just guessing.

https://www.west2k.com/pastations/westmoreland.shtml

Posted September 5, 2018, by Don Morrison

Looks like there was an old ROW that entered Scottdale on the west side of Jacobs Creek and possibly crossed a small bridge on the south side of Scottdale at 40.094492, -79.591247

possibly an old interurban railroad. Some of the old track is visible on the south side of Scottdale if you turn the Google Earth clock back to 2005.

Guess late 1800's until ~1945.

I attached a screen pic from Earth 2005 with the ROW in blue.

Also, Jacobs Creek appears to be the county line, so this bridge looks to be in two counties.

Posted September 5, 2018, by Luke

According to old maps from HistoricAerials and this: http://www.trainweb.org/chris/swpenn.html

This may have been built in 1871 for the Mt Pleasant and Broad Ford Railroad, which eventually became the Mt. Pleasant Branch of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad.

Posted September 5, 2018, by Don Morrison

Possibly an old rail ROW went across the bridge up the west side of Scottdale. If so, build date same as the railroad?

Posted September 4, 2018, by David R Hiebert (davidrhiebert [at] gmail [dot] com)

The stone in this bridge is in great shape.

I am seeking the date of construction. It almost surely predates the founding of Scottdale, 1874.

Any help would be appreciated.

Posted September 3, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Might be worth a Visit!

Penn Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 2, 2018, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As for the previous comment there may be inaccuracies which I don't know about.I'm just posting what is printed in the local paper.

Penn Street Bridge (Pennsylvania)
Posted September 2, 2018, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Me and my fiancée travelled over this bridge on both the outbound and inbound lanes yesterday.The outbound lane is finished and now the work begins on the inbound lane.The ornate railing along with the obelisk are on the outbound side of the bridge.Of course the railing was created to match the original railing along with the lookouts and lighting which is almost exactly like the original lighting.The median at the present time is removed and is now a cattleshute if anybody knows what that is.I read in this past Wednesdays Reading Eagle a history of this bridge from the very beginning.In 1795 when George Washington was president and the Schuylkill River was named Hidden Creek according to the Pennsylvania Dutch a ferryboat was the only way to get goods and people across to the foot of Penn Street.This was the only convenient place to cross the river,upstream or downstream for over 70 years previously.Crossing the river was dangerous at this time due to no dams on the river.3 women and a young girl drowned in a ferry capsizing in 1800.In 1795 $32,000 which was allocated to build a bridge was deemed insufficient.A lottery was ordered to raise $60,000 which failed.The second attempt at building a bridge was in 1801 when a wooden bridge was to be built at a cost of $16,000 which failed with the builder only laying the piers.In 1805 a third unsuccessful attempt was made.In 1812 authorization was made to build a stone or wooden bridge and charge a toll to pay for it.On December 20,1815 a wooden bridge opened for travel.Tolls were footman 1 cent;every 20 sheep,20 cents;every 20 swine,10 cents;every 20 cattle,20 cents;horse or mule,4 cents;sulky with 2 wheels and 1 horse,12 1/2 cents;horse and rider,6 cents;carriage with 2 horses,25 cents;carriage with 4 horses,37 1/2 cents;stagecoach with 2 horses,25 cents;stagecoach with 4 horses,30 cents;sleigh and horse,6 cents;draft sleigh and horse,5 cents and wagon or cart and horse,6 cents.This bridge has to be the covered bridge I saw pictures of.in 1884 the Pennsylvania Schuylkill Valley Railroad Co. built a 3-span iron bridge with a 924-foot-long-viaduct which replaced the previous bridge.This bridge cost the railroad $100,000 to build and the county commissioners put up $30,000.The current bridge was dedicated on May 22,1914.

Posted September 2, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

As of 8-30-18 this bridge is now open after repairs according to the Reading Eagle.This bridge is 43 years old and 460 feet long,2 12-foot lanes with a daily vehicle traffic of 7,300.These figures are printed in the paper so I don't know if they're reliable or not.By the way,this project cost a total of $6.9 million.

Point Rock Tunnel (Pennsylvania)
Posted August 29, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Man I hate to ask but does a Tunnel consist of one hole or TWO! Internet debate regarding straws same question of no help.

Posted August 27, 2018, by Anonymous

Funicular

Posted August 25, 2018, by George oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced and is now open for traffic as of earlier this week.The single-span bridge,built in 1926 and rebuilt in 1956 with an average daily traffic volume of 3,589 vehicles was replaced with a precast concrete box culvert.Also roadway approach and drainage work were performed along with sanitary sewer line relocation and guardrail replacement.The total cost was $516,642 for the whole project which finished before September,the anticipated completion.

Posted August 22, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

How might one see that obit?

Posted August 22, 2018, by Anonymous

There's an online obituary for the guy who had previously commented about growing up close to the bridge.

Posted August 22, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Daniel, do you have news?

Posted August 21, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

RIP Dick Stevens

Posted August 18, 2018, by Anonymous

That was my suspicion. Some of her comments still plague this site.

Posted August 18, 2018, by Anonymous

Timestamp matches up with when she was pestering the site.

Posted August 18, 2018, by Anonymous

Of course, we are assuming that this is the same Amanda...

Posted August 18, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Someone goofed, most likely. I've corrected it