Rating:
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Zorger Road Bridge

Photos 

Portal

Photo taken by Janis Ford

Enlarge

BH Photo #141590

Map 

Street View 

Description 

FROM THE 1996-2001 PENNSYLVANIA HISTORIC BRIDGE SURVEY: "The bridge carries a 1 lane road over a stream in a rural area of active farms. TR 420 is a former railroad right of way converted to a vehicular roadway. The short line was a branch of the New York Central Railroad. It served primarily as a logging railroad, connecting to towns in southern Clearfield County, such as New Millport and Kerrmoor."

"The ca. 1880, single span, 180'-long, pin-connected double intersection Pratt (Whipple) thru truss bridge is supported on ashlar abutments. Designed to railroad specifications, the bridge consists of 10, 18'-long panels. It has eye bar diagonals that extend across two panels, lower chords eye bars, and built up upper chords and verticals. It is one of nine Whipple truss bridges identified by the survey, and one of two in Clearfield County (17 7222 0565 0005 is the other). The Whipple design was patented by American engineer Squire Whipple in 1847, and it was widely adopted by the railroad industry between 1865 and 1885. The bridge is historically and technologically significant as a complete and rare surviving example of the design."

Facts 

Overview
Through truss bridge over West Branch Susquehanna River on TR 421
Location
Clearfield County, Pennsylvania
Status
Intact but closed to all traffic
History
Built 1885; converted to road ca 1937
Railroads
- Curry Run Railroad
- New York Central Railroad (NYC)
Design
pin-connected Double intersection (Whipple) through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 172.9 ft.
Total length: 180.1 ft.
Deck width: 12.1 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 20.6 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.90962, -78.66677   (decimal degrees)
40°54'35" N, 78°40'00" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/696503/4531345 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Mahaffey
Average daily traffic (as of 2017)
30
Inventory numbers
PA 17 7217 0421 0005 (Pennsylvania Bridge Management System number)
PANBI 11915 (Pennsylvania BRKEY bridge number on the 2011 NBI)
BH 30732 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of April 2017)
Overall condition: Poor
Superstructure condition rating: Poor (4 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 23.9 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • July 30, 2020: New photos from Brian Manville
  • December 30, 2019: New Street View added by Luke
  • December 30, 2019: Updated by Brian Manville: Updated status
  • May 23, 2011: Updated by Jodi Christman: Added description and related details
  • June 18, 2009: New photos from J.R. Manning

Sources 

Comments 

Zorger Road Bridge
Posted December 30, 2019, by Anonymous

Spectacular old bridge!

Zorger Road Bridge
Posted December 30, 2019, by Luke

The build date I've changed the entry to comes from the following ICC documentation: https://books.google.com/books?id=cSLxlZVpJB4C&pg=PA91&lpg=P...

A geocaching page (https://www.geocaching.com/geocache/GC2RBDA_susquehanna-bridges-curry-run?guid=a1ead3fb-5092-410a-b600-f5ab32b2344e ) gives a build date that is a decade off of the ICC doc, but also gives enough historical background of the logging operation run by James Mitchell (Who wrote a book about logging in the county https://books.google.com/books?id=11EluAAACAAJ&dq=mitchels+c... I'm confident in saying that the logging encampment the spur went to was the "Mitchells" mentioned in the ICC documents. The now-unincorporated community of Curry Run is at the north end of this bridge.

Anyone else considering this another open/shut case?

Zorger Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nice converted RR span!

Give Gene a thumbs up on his earlier call

West Branch Susquehanna River Bridge
Posted June 18, 2009, by Gene McCluney (mccluney [at] sbcglobal [dot] net)

This bridge looks much older than 1920. I think this may have been a late 19th century railroad span that was re-used in 1920 as a road bridge.