Rating:
4 votes

Bower Bridge

Photos 

Camp Corby Rd Bridge

Photo taken by Brian McKee in May 2010

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BH Photo #170082

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge with steel arch reinforcement over West Branch Susquehanna River on Camp Corby Road.
Location
Clearfield County, Pennsylvania
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built ca. 1910; rehabilitated with steel arch support in 1988
Builder
- Carnegie Steel Co. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Design
9-panel, pinned Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Span length: 131.9 ft.
Total length: 131.9 ft.
Deck width: 16.0 ft.
Also called
Camp Corbly Road Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.89708, -78.67728   (decimal degrees)
40°53'49" N, 78°40'38" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/695655/4529929 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Mahaffey
Average daily traffic (as of 2017)
40
Inventory numbers
PA 17 7217 0418 0005 (Pennsylvania Bridge Management System number)
PANBI 11913 (Pennsylvania BRKEY bridge number on the 2011 NBI)
BH 30731 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of May 2017)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Fair (5 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 64.4 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • January 20, 2021: New photos from Patrick Gurwell
  • May 23, 2011: Updated by Jodi Christman: Corrected street spelling

Sources 

Comments 

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 24, 2011, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Great discussion as always. I would suspect that the Bedsteads were built by Blodgett. They did build similar Bedsteads with laced endposts.

Ex: http://bridgehunter.com/ks/neosho/671053506140/

As for the Wilson Bridge, the KSHS page does not provide a builder, but does provide a construction date of 1940 which is probably a corruption of the NBI date of 1904.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 24, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I've not seen one like that either.....and it doesn't resemble the WIBCo one's I've seen. Might be something from Missouri Valley B&I or Kansas City B&I Co's.

Bridge might be a little older than 1904.....although that seems like a funny default date......

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 24, 2011, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The bedsteads mentioned are a mystery, because most (but not all) bedsteads date to after 1890. Do you think either of those bedsteads might be built by Blodgett? Anyway, they may have used leftover steel, or I have never thought about this before, but the mill name marks we see on metal would have been either cast or attached to the steel/iron rollers. I am guessing they were cast integrally with the rollers since I never see a border around the names. Maybe they just never changed out the old rollers or names, since that would have been costly.

As for the Wilson Bridge, that is an extremely unusual four-prong design. Might not be a WIBC, its a bit different in design than the ones I have seen as it terminates to two independent eyes that wrap around the hanger. Very interesting however.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 24, 2011, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have noticed both Carnegie designs, but one thing had me puzzled (and still does). Here are two Bedstead trusses with laced endposts:

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/lincoln/530737804345/

http://bridgehunter.com/ks/brown/70989203248/

The first one, with a NBI date of 1910 (a common default date in Kansas) bears the old design. The second bridge (no NBI date) bears the new design.

My two theories are that either the default date of 1910 for the Beaver Creek Bridge is wrong or the bridge was built with older stock.

As a side note, here is a (supposedly) 1904 Pratt through truss with the old design: http://bridgehunter.com/ks/dickinson/wilson/

In my humble opinion, this Pratt truss looks like a late 1890s WIBC product due to the four-pronged connections on the hip verticals and the simplified portal bracing.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Jodi Christman

Nathan, thanks for your response. I always appreciate your knowledge and sharing of it :-)

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Only the oldest Carnegie marks have the simple, plain font design on large beams (vertical member channels, for example). Later bridges used other designs, such as this design which is italicized and with the stylized "N"

http://www.historicbridges.org/pennsylvania/pondeddy/PICT866...

The simple font was still used for small beams like angles however.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Jodi Christman

Interesting to know, but the Carnegie mill markings appear on more modern bridges like the 1938 Market St. bridge in Clearfield, PA. How are you determining that it dates the bridge back to 1880s? Thanks in advance.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Good to know about the Carnegie stamp. I have seen that on many bridges in Kansas and was hoping that it would give some reference as to the construction date.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Good point on the mill mark design. That design usually shows up on older trusses even as far back as the 1880s.

Camp Corbly Road Thru Truss Bridge
Posted May 23, 2011, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Carnegie stamp dates this bridge older than the 1910 date given, probably more akin to the 1890's.

I guess it's a save situation.....but I still don't like these added arches.

West Branch Susquehanna River Bridge
Posted June 17, 2009, by Janis Ford (jford3 [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

6/7/09 I think I found this bridge, but not at the GPS from the inventory. T418/Camp Corbly Rd. The description fits. I was at 40 53 50N 78 40 39W. (see attached photo of the GPS when I was sitting on the bridge) I don't believe we actually ever were at the location from the web site, so there could be another bridge there also.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.