Rating:
2 votes

Devils Lake Fork Bridge

Photos 

Photo From Determination of Effect Report, May 2003

Enlarge

BH Photo #222659

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Steel stringer bridge over Devils Lake Fork on OR 6
Location
Tillamook County, Oregon
Status
Open to traffic
Future prospects
2010 project replaced steel "picked fence" rail with three-tube steel rail.
History
Built 1940
Builders
- Glenn S. Paxson of Salem, Oregon (Bridge Engineer)
- McNutt Brothers (Contractor)
Design
Steel stringer with built-up steel bents.
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 105.0 ft.
Total length: 590.9 ft.
Deck width: 25.9 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+45.61667, -123.39083   (decimal degrees)
45°37'00" N, 123°23'27" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/469528/5051532 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Woods Point
Average daily traffic (as of 2014)
4,900
Inventory numbers
OR 02472 (Oregon Dept. of Transportation structure number)
BH 50772 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of April 2016)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Deck condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 64.8 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • January 4, 2012: Updated by Michael Goff: Fixed Oregon highway numbers, added photos & added builders.
  • January 3, 2012: Added by Nathan Holth

Sources 

  • Nathan Holth
  • Mike Goff - michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 9, 2012, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

In Michigan, we combine the need for a safe and functional modern railing with the importance of retaining the original material and beauty of a historic railing by replacing railing posts, adding tube guardrail, and mounting the original historic bridge railing panels between the posts, behind the modern tube railing. See below example. This method does not reduce roadway width and the end result still looks quite nice. I do not see why this solution would not have worked here in Oregon. Looking at the design of the railing posts on this Oregon bridge, it appears it would have been extremely easy to simply fit the old railing panels between the posts.

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I can understand railing needing to be up to modern day standards...but(sigh)that doesn't mean I have to like it!

Those wonderful columns look kinda lost and out of place now!

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Mike,

Glad to see your photos of it. When I found this bridge and saw how impressive it was I was surprised myself to find it unlisted. Based on your photos, it appears that they have not demolished the bridge, but instead have replaced the original railings. I learned about the bridge from a multi-bridge Memorandum of Agreement I dug up and so I thought it was a goner. Glad to see they apparently are keeping it.

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

There is one suspension bridge that I know of that is still around in Honduras.

http://en.structurae.de/structures/data/index.cfm?id=s000802...

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks as always for the info Mike!

Would be interesting to look into CBM's work in Central American and see if any interesting structures are to be found.

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Conde McCullough was only involved with this bridge from an administrative standpoint. Along with his state bridge engineer duties McCullough also served as Assistant State Highway Engineer starting in 1932. He served in both rolls until he was choose to lead bridge design work for the Bureau of Public Road on the Pan-American Highway in Central America from late 1936 through 1937. Upon his return to Oregon he was forced to give up the roll of State Bridge Engineer in order to fulfill his duties as Assistant Highway Engineer.

It is probably safe to say the McCullough still had a limited amount influence over the bridge section, though his biographer states he was completely divorced from the bridge section upon his return. In the book Elegant Arches, Soaring Spans by Robert Hadlow it is stated the McCullough resented being “kicked upstairs” after returning from Central America, when he was not allowed to resume his bridge design work.

However, one of his duties as assistant highway engineer was to review construction plans. Therefore, the signatures of Conde McCullough as well as the successor bridge engineer Glenn S. Paxson are both on the Devils Lake Fork Bridge drawings.

Devils Lake Fork Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Was McCullough involved in the design of this one Mike?

The Art-deco style columns on the ends look like a possible signature of his work.

OR-6 Bridge
Posted January 4, 2012, by Michael Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nathan,

Good catch on adding this one. When I seen that you added it I thought you were crazy and made a duplicate structre. However, upon further review I realized that I am crazy and have 45 photos of a bridge I never added. I will add my photos from last May soon.

MG