Rating:
3 votes

OPR - Breitenbush River Covered Bridge

Photos 

DESCRIPTION: This covered railroad bridge on the Oregon Pacific rail line was photographed in Marion County on April 22, 1949. It was located at Detroit where it spanned the Breitenbush River. The bridge number was #744-21. Note that the bridge does not exhibit the normal type of roof, but this techique does keep the vital truss members dry. Also, note the barrel on the left side of the entrance. This would contain water or sand to help extinquish a fire. Most of the rails of the rail line were covered by the water of Detroit Lake after the dam was completed.

Salem Public Library

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial (CC BY-NC)

View this photo at photos.salemhistory.net

BH Photo #279742

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost Through truss bridge over Breitenbush River on Oregon Pacific Railroad
Location
Detroit, Marion County, Oregon
Status
Removed but not replaced
Railroads
- Corvallis & Eastern Railroad (C&E)
- Oregon Central & Eastern Railway (OC&E)
- Oregon Pacific Railroad (1880-94) (OP)
Design
Through truss
Also called
Corvallis & Eastern Railway Covered Bridge
Breitenbush Covered Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+44.71283, -122.17526   (decimal degrees)
44°42'46" N, 122°10'31" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/565325/4951381 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Detroit
Inventory numbers
WCGB OR/37-24-16x

BH 60215 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • June 10, 2015: New photo from Luke
  • March 14, 2014: Updated by Dave King: Fixed photos
  • March 11, 2014: Updated by Luke Harden: GPS fix(?)
  • March 11, 2014: Added by Dave King

Sources 

  • Dave King - DKinghawkfan [at] hotmail [dot] com
  • Luke

Comments 

OPR - Breitenbush River Covered Bridge
Posted March 11, 2014, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] charter [dot] net)

The bridge was actually about a mile south and west of where you show it. The Breitenbush river came down on the north side of Piety Knob and the North Santiam passed by on the south. The two rivers merged just west of the knob, which is now an island in the middle of the lake. I attached a portion of a 1929 top with the actual location marked, and also a picture of the bridge as constructed, before it was covered. Map courtesy USGS, photo courtesy of Lloyd Palmer.

Attachment #2 (image/tiff; 1,214,912 bytes)