Rating:
3 votes

Delta Ponds Bridge

Photos 

Dsagsa

Photo taken by Andika Murandi

License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike (CC BY-NC-SA)

Enlarge

View this photo on Flickr

BH Photo #254946

Map 

Street Views 

Facts 

Overview
Cable-stayed bridge over Delta Highway on Pedestrian Pathway
Location
Eugene, Lane County, Oregon
Status
Open to pedestrians only
History
Built 2010.
Builders
- Jiří Stráský of Brno, South Moravia, Czech Republic
- OBEC Consulting Engineers of Eugene, Oregon
Design
Cable-stayed
Dimensions
Span length: 760.0 ft.
Total length: 760.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+44.07607, -123.10554   (decimal degrees)
44°04'34" N, 123°06'20" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/491549/4880326 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Eugene East
Inventory number
BH 56409 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • September 23, 2016: New Street View added by Dana and Kay Klein
  • May 30, 2013: Added by Luke Harden

Sources 

Comments 

Delta Ponds Bridge
Posted June 3, 2013, by Craig Philpott (cphilpott [at] puc [dot] edu)

In many ways this website is cataloging history. A slice of history called "bridges." Is not the notable construction of today the history of tomorrow? For me, any community that hires engineering and installs community structures that at least attempt to have more meaning than mere transportation should at least be acknowledged.

Delta Ponds Bridge
Posted May 31, 2013, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I personally don't like these or the MOB's being added to this site, but with the word "Notable" included in the site description I guess it leaves the door open. What's historic is pretty much cut and dried, but what's notable to one person is likely not to the next.

I have simply learned to ignore with grace...

Delta Ponds Bridge
Posted May 31, 2013, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Luke thanks for triggering my question asking button. I have had mixed feelings about including these types of structure in our database. They are a lot more interesting than the made to order bridges, I even added the first couple of these types of structures built in Oregon when I first started cataloging bridges, but have since not included them.

I am not saying they do not belong I am just curious what others think about these more and more common little cable stayed structures?