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OC&E State Trail - USRS "A" Canal Bridge

Photos 

O.C.&E. - A Canal Bridge

Photo taken by Michael Goff in April 2011

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BH Photo #222752

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Pratt through truss bridge over USRS "A" Canal on Oregon, California & Eastern Railroad Trail
Location
Klamath Falls, Klamath County, Oregon
Status
Open to pedestrians
History
Built 1898, 1917 Relocated to Klamath Falls
Builder
- Phoenix Bridge Co. of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania
Railroads
- Great Northern Railway (GN)
- Oregon, California & Eastern Railroad (OC&E)
- Rail-to-trail
- Southern Pacific Railroad (SP)
Design
Pin-connected Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Span length: 140.0 ft.
Total length: 140.0 ft.
Deck width: 8.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+42.19737, -121.73010   (decimal degrees)
42°11'51" N, 121°43'48" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
10/604845/4672470 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Altamont
Inventory number
BH 50812 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • June 12, 2016: Updated by Christopher Finigan: Added category "Preserved"
  • January 5, 2012: Added by Michael Goff

Sources 

Comments 

O.C.&E. - A Canal Bridge
Posted June 26, 2013, by Scott Gavin (fatpiecat2 [at] charter [dot] net)

I would be interested in knowing a bit more about the history of this bridge. I know it was supposedly manufactured by the Phoenix Bridge Co. and was located at the 17th crossing of the Sacramento River before being surplused and reused on the O C & E. But the bridge was also severely damaged. Michael's photos avoid showing the damaged sections, but some of the cross members in the deck are bent, as are some of the upright supports and turnbuckle straps, and on some of the main girders, the X straps are either severely bent or have been removed and replaced with rectangular plates. Was this bridge damaged at its original location, while being disassembled and moved, or after its installation on the O C & E? It's very interesting to study this bridge. None of the uprights are parallel to each other. When I stop to think of all the work I did making the members square and true when scratch-building model railroad bridges, it's rather startling to realize that the real bridge itself is not square...