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Posted May 24, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

It sure looks like it was intended to be lifted.

The three middle gusset plates may have been pre-punched and never had anything riveted to some of the holes.

It makes me think some shop was turning out prefab heavy bridges for railroad use.

Posted May 24, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

There is something fishy about this bridge. Its missing counter diagonal members, there are gusset plates with nothing attached at those points. I see lifting hooks welded to the end posts. Was this bridge moved? Was it really built in 1950?

Posted May 16, 2019, by Kirk J Poole (kjpportland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Build date of 1960 appears too late for the 'picket fence' handrail type which was used only until 1955-1956. This bridge appears to be built between 1945 and 1956.

Posted May 9, 2019, by Kirk J Poole (kjpportland [at] gmail [dot] com)

Originally built to span the 1951 US 30 2-lane, river-level fast highway. When I-80N (Later I-84) was built in 1961-1962 ODOT twinned the 2-lane into A 4-lane freeway. The overpass was already prepared in length for that eventuality.

Posted May 5, 2019, by Rick Anderson (rick [dot] david [dot] anderson [at] gmail [dot] com)

Had a good trip to the tunnel a weekend ago. It was fairly easy to find if you park on the road and then head down the old "road" to the west. You'll then enter the clear cut part way down and you should be able to see the old tracks to the west. The tunnel has had some plaster collapse, but otherwise looks in good shape. The east end of the tunnel is all huge timber. At some point old timber was removed when the tunnel was rebuilt (was this the 1996 storm or earlier?) and it's stacked to the east side in a pile. Lots of wood!

Posted April 3, 2019, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Some pics of the bridge I took in 1980-or 81

Posted March 13, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Cable rail with steel columns and top rail by ASF Ironworks in Springfield, Oregon.

Posted March 12, 2019, by Justin

And yet you've failed to give us the actual GPS, just a foamer whinging.

Posted March 12, 2019, by Jim Reed (jimr4163 [at] comcast [dot] net)

The location, gps, etc for this tunnel are completely wrong. It is on the wrong side of Hwy 58, and should be up above McCredie Springs, and Judd Mountain. Between tunnels 6 and 4. This is so wrong.

Posted March 9, 2019, by Dan Clark (megadjc [at] gmail [dot] com)

The timber structure that was lost to fire in 2015 is in fact in process of being rebuilt. I currently reside in the area and the trestle as of late 2018 is over halfway complete. It is a steel and concrete trestle being constructed in the exact same place and of similar length to the structure that was built in 1932.

Posted March 4, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

You're invited. The snow is going, going gone.

Please join us for the opening celebration of the Clark & Reeves, Phoenixville Bridge Works, 1882 Hayden Bridge on March 12th at 4pm in Springfield, Lane County, Oregon. Located at the corner of Marcola and Camp Creek and Hayden Bridge Roads, the crossing has no address but does have great presence across the street from Riverview Market and EWEB.

After the funding was secured from our very generous anonymous donor, and after we installed planks last fall, the railing will be installed this week by ASF Ironworks. We are ready to let everybody see the views. They are outstanding.

Please help us cut the ribbons from both sides / city and county and then meet in the middle where we will take a group photo. If I have missed anyone or if you can think of someone that needs to be involved please let me know. We sure haven't met everyone out here yet, although we try to get around.

If you have any questions or want to participate or donate to the event please don't hesitate to contact me. I will print up a few posters but don't hesitate to print and pass around or hang them in areas where we can get the word out best.

Press is invited to the bridge during the railing installation as well. That starts today by ASF Ironworks.

Posted March 1, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Could this be the only bridge to officially span a "Dip"? ;-p

Posted March 1, 2019, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It is looking good Julie, job well done with all you have done to save this interesting bridge.

I'm going to have to make a trip down to Springfield to take a look at some point.

Posted March 1, 2019, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Scott,

You are correct, that stretch of highway was built in the mid to late 1940's during a realignment of the Pacific Highway. Many of the overflow structures around the Santiam River were timber pile supported bridges.

The interesting part about the Whiteson Dip structure, at least to me, is that it roughly dates to the same time period in which I-5 was being constructed in the Santiam River area as you described. However, it was when the concrete bridges were being constructed and not the earlier timber structures.

The choice for such a large timber structure to be placed on a state highway at such a late date is quite an interesting one to me.

On a side note, we still have well over 200 bridges with timber members sprinkled throughout the state highway system in Western Oregon, with even more on the local roads. Timber, though not necessarily king anymore is still holding strong as a bridge material (at least when it is maintained).

Have a good day,

Mike

Posted March 1, 2019, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

On the southbound lanes of I-5, between Salem and Eugene, there were several bridges of this type with wooden trestle underpinnings and concrete decks and rails. The northbound lanes, which I presume were built later, were concrete above and below. I believe those timber bridges were all replaced in the 1990s.

Posted February 28, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

New deck width is 7'6" between curb.

Thanks Michael. Railing going on after the snow melts.

Posted February 26, 2019, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Also, I updated the numbers since I calculated them...

Posted February 26, 2019, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Looking at the HAER drawings, I found the following information.

Truss spacing: 16' center to center

Horizontal Clearance: ~14'-8" (truss spacing subtracting a thickness of Phoenix Column (15-7/8")

Vertical Clearance: ~19' portal to top of track (floor beam to portal distance, minus stringer, railroad ties, track)

All of this is based off the railroad dimensions provided by HAER, obviously if the deck has been modified by Julie's efforts these measurements would be different.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Daniel

Under "design" it states that the inside horizontal clearance is 18'and inside vertical clearance 14'. That doesn't seem right to me: I see significantly more height available than width.

Posted February 25, 2019, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Snowy day.

Posted February 22, 2019, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here is a historical picture of the trestle site.

Posted February 15, 2019, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Leslie, you are correct finished bridge opened last year. I updated the page to reflect the replacement.

Posted February 15, 2019, by Leslie R Trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

According to the Street view, this bridge has been replaced.

Posted January 4, 2019, by Leslie R trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

I have A Images Of America book on Reedsport I cant find it right now but I do recall seeing a picture of a trestle near Winchester Bay but I cant remember the company.

Posted January 4, 2019, by Leslie R trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

Some times they did and sometimes they did not it all depends on the map.

Posted January 4, 2019, by Daniel

Looking at historic topo maps, I don't see any railroads there. Did logging railroads end up on topos?

Posted December 20, 2018, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

All I can say is WOW Luke set me up for an adventure by adding this long lost bridge.

I was waiting for some printing and decided I would look this bridge up and add some information on it.

What an interesting history.

We have main spans collapsing, replacements, reconstructions and I never did figure out when the thing was removed.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Luke

"A contract will be awarded to cover the replacing of timber structures with steel spans across the Calapooia river, on the Oregon Electric, at Albany, Ore., at an estimated cost of $90,000. The filling of a timber bridge and placing a reinforced ..."

Excerpted from https://books.google.com/books?id=EY0lAAAAMAAJ&q=Oregon%20el...

and

https://hh-today.com/work-upgrades-trestle-on-pw-line/?fbcli...

Says a G&W/PNWR PR guy sais it's late 1800s, but a commentor says there's a 1908 cutout on the upper part of the bridge.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I know nothing about this structure, I believe when I first added this bridge it was listed with an unknown build date. Then Charles posted something about the 1908 build date which was incorporated into the listing.

I would agree that the truss details are more consistent with something pre-1900. My guess is that the truss was moved to this location in 1908 from somewhere else in the country.

Most rail trusses in the northwest prior to 1900 were timber trusses built in the 1880's and 90's. My guess is the timber decayed away in 20 to 30 years and recycled trusses were brought in to replace the timber. There are plenty of examples of this practice around Oregon.

Posted November 15, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Yes, that is correct, the piers now support high voltage powerlines.

Posted November 15, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I agree that the portals and the pin connections indicate an older bridge, however I havenít seen a subdivided Warren thatís pin connected before this. I would think if it was an 1880s bridge, it probably wouldíve been built as a whipple. Perhaps this one was built in the 1890s and moved here? Relocation was quite common on railroads, especially former main line spans that had life left in them.

Posted November 14, 2018, by Daniel Barnes

Am I seeing correctly that they repurposed the bridge piers for the powerlines?

Posted November 14, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Does anyone else think that this bridge's pin-connected trusses and their subdivided, modified Warren truss are a little elaborate for a 1908 bridge? I'm wondering if this is a bridge relocated here in 1908. Cannot find any info online. I don't recall ever seeing a pin-connected Warren truss of any variety on a railroad that wasn't pre-1900. Most are 1880s.

Posted November 1, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

End "Plates" can be site specific perforated, IE name of town or org. in bridge. Good Marketing....

Posted November 1, 2018, by Luke

If Bach is pricing their replica spans competitively with brands like E.T. Techtonics and the modern Continental Bridge Co. who are cornering that market, they might have a chance.

Posted November 1, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Recognizing that some situations like remote locations might require lightweight bridges that could be transported by helicopter, etc, a unique alternative would be to have a company such as Bach Steel provide a custom-designed ALL-NEW replica riveted truss bridge, which would look similar to historic lightweight riveted truss bridges, such as this: https://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=m...

Posted November 1, 2018, by Luke

Good thing it's a utilitarian span in the woods, much like the crushed bridge it replaced then.

Posted November 1, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Whatever it is, it certainly doesn't have the character defining features of a Conde McCullough masterpiece...

Posted October 31, 2018, by Jay Dumas (dumastalent [at] aol [dot] com)

I have a picture of this bridge. Will send it to someone to post but I don't have a scanner

Posted October 31, 2018, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Mike,

Is this one of those fiberglass made to order bridges? Oregon State Parks has a few of these on their trail system, that I have had the pleasure of inspecting.

Just curious.

Mike Goff

Posted October 31, 2018, by Jay Dumas (dumastalent [at] aol [dot] com)

I have a picture of this bridge. Will send it to someone to post but I don't have a scanner

Posted October 31, 2018, by Mike Garland (Rapier342 [at] comcast [dot] net)

*Update* The bridge was untouched by the major fire that swept through the area in September 2017. The Eagle Creek Suspension Bridge and the Fern Creek Bridge were not so lucky, they were destroyed.

Posted October 26, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Mike thanks for updated photos, looks like nice rehab!

Posted October 26, 2018, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This structure was replaced in 1990 by a made to order steel girder structure for the Banks-Vernonia Trail. The only remaining portion of the original bridge is the timber pile trestle bents located on the slopes below the abutments.

The bridge pictured is the steel replacement structure.

Posted October 19, 2018, by Leslie R Trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)
Posted October 17, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I cleaned the west abutment. Still needs a broom but the matting is gone. Here is the shoe. The other end has the rollers for the expansion but the bees need to slumber before clean up. Maintenance. Almost there for funding the railing.

Posted October 10, 2018, by Leslie R Trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well Lawmakers are back talking about replacement it would be bad to see this bridge replaced by a UCEB.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/oregon-ho...

Posted October 6, 2018, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Planked. Railing next .... under fundraising for that.

Posted August 7, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge's on-deck beauty has been RUINED by the addition of a hideous cyclone fence that even blocks the beautiful concrete benches that people could once sit on. The fence is NOT just on top of the railing, it extends in front of the railing down to the sidewalk. This cheap budget-style cyclone fence makes this bridge look like it belongs in an derelict industrial area of Detroit not in a nice city like Portland. If they wanted a suicide barrier or something they should have chosen something that doesn't look like garbage.

Posted June 29, 2018, by Leslie R trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

More news on replacement the bridge will be persevered.

http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/local-

Posted June 18, 2018, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It wasn't fogged in last week, but still impressive none the less!

Blue Moon (Oregon)
Posted June 18, 2018, by .....justsayin........
Posted June 18, 2018, by Mark Johnson (markajohnson [at] rocketmail [dot] com)

Once in a blue moon, the Astoria, OR side of this bridge is fogged in and you are certain you are on a bridge to nowhere when coming from Washington. It's spectacular and a bit scary.

Posted June 18, 2018, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Just to the west of this bridge, the Ewana Box Company had a logging railroad which crossed the river. There are still a few rotted pilings at the site.

Posted June 16, 2018, by Matt Lohry

Leslie,

If you have an account, you can go in anytime and edit the bridge. If you're signed in, there should be a yellow button on the individual bridge's page that says "edit bridge". You can go in there and change the bridge type.

Posted June 15, 2018, by Leslie R trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

I meant to put timber string but I accidentally put steel stringer and didn't check the page before I published it.

Posted June 15, 2018, by Leslie R trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

Both bridges were build in the same and by reading your comment and comparing the image to google street view imagery, I have found out that this is the actual location

of the two bridges not under Phillips Reservoir like I thought originally thought. Thank you for correcting the location.

Posted June 15, 2018, by Leslie R trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge will be dismantled next week hopefully it will be relocated and preserved instead being thrown in the scrap bin.

http://www.mycolumbiabasin.com/2018/06/15/eighth-street-brid...

Posted June 14, 2018, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I notice that the descriptions listed this as a "Steel Stringer" bridge. It was actually a wooden trestle. It replaced the original red bridge when the SVRwy laid heavier rails in order to run larger locomotives, such as their Mikados and the former Uintah mallets.

Posted June 13, 2018, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Correction: I wasn't paying enough attention. Red Bridge 2 is what I had referred to as the Heavy Duty trestle. Sorry about that, chief!

Posted June 13, 2018, by Scott Gavin (trainnut1956 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Actually, the location shown is in error. Boulder Gorge, and the site of the Red Bridge 1, Red Bridge 2 and the heavy duty trestle that replaced the 2nd red bridge was several miles east of Philips Lake, and is not under water. Highway 7 still passes through the site. When I first visited the bridge site in 1977, It was easy to compare the rocks alongside the highway to the railroad photos and see that it was the same site. When they turned the county road into Highway 7 they widened the road to add shoulders and widen the lanes a little, and in doing so the rocks were cut back, so it is not quite as recognizable as it used to be. I could only find one of the concrete blocks that once supported the third bridge in the river. Attached is a Google satellite view with the actual location of Bolder Gorge and the bridge site marked.

Posted April 26, 2018, by Luke

Nice find, Leslie.

Seems the PNW had a lot of wooden trusses that lasted far longer than their Midwestern/Eastern contemporaries.

Posted April 19, 2018, by Gordon Cully (gordon [at] gccphotography [dot] com)

I know you have plenty of photos in the gallery, however I just wanted to share a couple I shot recently. This bridge has been long time favorite of mine. Hope you enjoy the photos.

Posted April 18, 2018, by Luke

According to http://www.oregonlive.com/oregon-city/index.ssf/2011/02/hist...

1908: Hawley Pulp & Paper Mill built at the site.

Operated thru 2011 under various names, last of which was Blue Heron.

Posted April 18, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Does anyone have a link to history of the mill complex? There are a lot of unanswered questions about this place.

Posted March 5, 2018, by Leslie R Trick

And it is not just this bridge I am speaking for every neglected historic bridges no matter what design though some can not be saved I am glad to see people try to rehabilitate bridges in derelict condition.

Posted March 5, 2018, by Leslie r Trick

It is so sad to see bridges like this so many years of neglect and forgotten ever since the new highway was put in the 1960s.

Posted March 1, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Flagged for deletion/merge

Posted March 1, 2018, by Luke
Posted January 17, 2018, by Leslie R Trick

Thank You For the Link.

Posted January 13, 2018, by Leslie R Trick

Thank you for the comment I am glad to hare that your are not the only one that gives advice.

Posted January 13, 2018, by Luke

No problem.

I appreciate the stuff you've been finding and adding, and I guarantee I'm not the only user who does.

Posted January 13, 2018, by Leslie R trick

Thank you Luke for all the tips you have given me I appreciate it.

Posted January 13, 2018, by Luke

Another bit of info, Leslie: Bridgehunter automatically adds the state to the city name, so you don't need to add ", OR" to the city, the site will automatically add ", Oregon" for you after you submit the data.

Posted January 12, 2018, by Luke

No problem, you're new to the site so you don't know the ins/outs/quirks yet.

Posted January 12, 2018, by Leslie R trick

Alright thank you for the advice Luke I appreciate your comment about keeping up the good work i did that because the bridges were built on the same piers but one replaced another so they are two separate bridges.

Posted January 12, 2018, by Leslie R Trick

Wow his bridges are amazing I am now looking forward to Spain!

Posted January 12, 2018, by Dana

Leslie thanks for adding video. Also fond of Santiago bridges.Bridgehunter may be expanding internationally so look forward to SPAIN!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Calatrava

Posted January 12, 2018, by Leslie R trick

I do agree with you this is in my opinion the most beautiful swing span in the nation Conde McCullough was an amazing engineer you will never find another one like him.

Posted January 12, 2018, by Luke

Leslie, each iteration of a bridge should be its own entry.

You could convert one of the duplicates you added to be for the second iteration of the Madison Street Bridge.

https://bridgehunter.com/or/multnomah/bh80037/

https://bridgehunter.com/or/multnomah/bh80033/

Keep up the good work.

Posted January 10, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Leslie, Swing span is becoming rare, but is a mundane artifact in the shadow of Conde B. McCullough approach spans. This is an amazing bridge!

Posted January 10, 2018, by Leslie Trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is the remaining operating swing span in Oregon their used to be more, but most of them have ben replaced by UCEBs

though some were in serious condition, their were broken promises in historic "Oregon Sate Highway Bridges" ODOT planned to keep the Coquille river bridge for a pedestrian bridge but they tore it down that is why this bridge is so important.

Posted January 9, 2018, by Luke
Posted January 9, 2018, by Leslie Trick (Leslie [dot] Trick [at] gmail [dot] com)

Does anyone have photos of this bridge I am very interested in bridges especially in my home state of Oregon their are sadly so many lost movable bridges in my state.

Posted January 9, 2018, by Ryan

This bridge was dismantled by Hamilton Construction, but rebuild by Wildish Standard Paving Company.

Posted December 30, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Ready for planks and railing.

Posted December 24, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Something to know for future reference perhaps.

Posted December 24, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Turns out, after a year, almost two, that there are no permits required to plank and rail this bridge because it wont ever need to carry a fire truck. Haha.... spoent a lot ofmoney ti reach that result. Totally cool. Merry Christmas.

Posted December 1, 2017, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Mike Garland,

Glad to see someone finally got some photos of this old bridge.

I always wanted to take a boat ride under it, but have never found the time.

Once again, nice job.

Mike Goff

Posted November 7, 2017, by For info

Circa (from Latin, meaning 'around, about'), usually abbreviated c., ca or ca. (also circ. or cca.), means "approximately" in several European languages including English, usually in reference to a date.

Posted November 7, 2017, by Norm Webb (normwebb [at] comcast [dot] net)

Re the bridge: Was it made in Calif.? If not, what does Ca. mean?

What was you source of the year of the bridge? (1915)

Keep up the great job!!

Norm

Posted October 22, 2017, by Luke
Posted October 22, 2017, by J.L.O. (Pwrstrok4u [at] yahoo [dot] com)

What was that building used for. I was curious when we drove by it. It's all boarded up now but it had to be built for something. Maybe a Toll booth??

Thanks,

J.L.O.

Posted October 22, 2017, by Jay Nelson (jaynelson310 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have an original 1909 CPRR photograph that has "C.P. Reconst'n R.C. West End of Tunnel No 13 May 14, 1909"

Looks as if they are just starting to set the stone blocks for the portal. Would anyone be interested in the photo. I got this in a stack of old photos at an auction. I am after Southern California RR photos and this doesnt fit.

Posted September 6, 2017, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Oneonta Tunnel caught fire this week during the Eagle Creek Fire east of Portland.

http://www.kptv.com/story/36294814/eagle-creek-fire-tears-th...

ODOT inspectors were going to try to check on the bridges on both I-84 and the historic highway today to see if the fire has caused any further damage to these prized structures.

The Columbia River Gorge and the Historic Columbia River Highway is going to be changed for a generation thanks to some careless teenagers.

Posted August 11, 2017, by Sean Bates (seanbates [at] live [dot] com)

I was recently looking at a comparison of the NB bridge (1917) and the SB bridge (1958) before the NB had been reconfigured to match the SB bridge... and I noticed that 3 whole sections of the original NB bridge are missing!!

The new "humpback" section is new in 1958, but I count only 7 original sections after the tower-spans, where originally that count was 10. What happened to the other 3 segments? Scrapped? Repurposed elsewhere? Thanks!

here's the 1959 aerial for reference!

http://content.libraries.wsu.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/v...

Posted August 9, 2017, by Dana and Kay Klein

nice Penn Bridge plaque photo on this one.

Posted July 28, 2017, by Mike Goff (michael [dot] goff [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The Siuslaw River Bridge is being rehabilitated, concrete repairs with a cathodic protection system. Even with the containment it is a magnificent structure. I got to spend last night hanging under the bascule span and woke up to this view!

Posted July 28, 2017, by Richard Sparkman (naildryver [at] yahoo [dot] com)

It is known as other names. I'm just curious to know if there has been a log or data on vehicle accidents in or entering or exiting this. I travel through there often and its very narrow. I have been lucky to get through it 50+ times of maybe 2 without incident. I recently witnessed a fatality. I'm a careful driver but I have my concern. ~Rich

Posted June 29, 2017, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Truly, I agree Tony. The cost of a new bridge at this length is very affordable in DNREC eyes. It needs some work at splice plates and pin connections, new pins and big cranes.