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Posted April 8, 2019, by Bryan Jackson (bryan [at] ebryans [dot] com)

YouTube Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjIk4ekjmic&feature=youtu.be

God opened up the beautiful skies for this nostalgic bridge shoot in Byars Oklahoma. Enjoy as Bryan Jackson, Founder of Vertical Adrenaline Motocross Ministries, performs his Doug Domokos "Wheelie King" Tribute performances on the resurrected one-lane bridge that connects Byars in McClain County and Wanette in Pottawatomie County Oklahoma. At 785 feet, it is the longest camel-back truss bridge in the state of Oklahoma.

Filming took some 3 hours, using 8 cameras - and a drone. A special thanks to Jeff Cox photography for his insight and incredible photo and videographer skills. And to Bryans wife Tina for capturing some incredible stills during the filming process. Post production was done by Bryan himself.

Bryan enjoys traveling and incorporates his stunts with his appearances, racing, and ministry with Vertical Adrenaline.

All things Bryan Jackson and Vertical Adrenaline can be found online at www.VerticalAdrenaline.com as well as his Facebook and Instagram. He'll have your face and heart smiling as he uses his God given gifts and talents as a platform and share the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

For booking info on appearances, stunt shows, speaking

engagements - and more, go to www.VerticalAdrenaline.com/promo

Facebook: Bryan Jackson

Instagram: bryanjackson25

YouTube: VerticalAMM

MUSIC: American - Imagine Dragons

Posted March 23, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

The 1948 Shell Oil Oklahoma highway map shows OK 2 as unpaved and not crossing the county line. The 1969 topo shows a paved road crossing into Pittsburg County and this route as an unpaved road. This is almost certainly the old alignment of OK 2.

Posted March 22, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This one is older than 1925.

Posted March 22, 2019, by M Major (ihrtcpr [at] gmail [dot] com)

As a child, I used to walk to this bridge to watch the polecats play and build their homes. I'm astonished that one can still drive on it. it was in bad condition 50 years ago!

How wonderful to see that it is still standing

Sincerely M Major

Posted March 22, 2019, by Gene McCluney (gmacfilm [at] live [dot] com)

Obviously the Mill Creek sister bridge was removed, but how odd that part of the concrete deck remains. See listing for that bridge.

Posted March 21, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The sub-division of the panels is very unique, not sure that this would qualify as a Baltimore but likely is just a Pratt variant. It does appear to possibly be a DOT design on an old alignment, but if so what happened to it's mate just to the South over Mill Creek? Looking at old maps and imagery might shed some light!

Posted March 20, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I'm really glad you got there to take the pictures. This is an interesting bridge and I hope the cut section was a one-time thing.

Posted March 19, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's amazing that some idiot would cut out a section of a diagonal... Of course I don't want to see the bridge collapse on them, but it would certainly serve them right if it did!

Posted March 18, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

If you zoom in on Google map you'll see not only N3910 and N 180 given... But also Hickory Street. Not uncommon to have several names for the same road.

Also that 1932 build date is way off... That's a ca. 1900 pinned bedstead.

Posted March 18, 2019, by CABurton (CABurton159 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Around here that road is always called N180, where does the E3910 number come from?

Posted March 9, 2019, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is now closed to all traffic. The trailer park it once led to is now empty and the land is owned by the Creek Nation, which owns the nearby River Spirit Casino complex.

No news on any plans here, but I hope the bridge survives.

Posted February 19, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Might just be a repair, maybe deck repair and joint replacement project based on the image I see.

Posted February 19, 2019, by J Lance (bugo [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge appears to be doomed per Google Maps.

Posted February 9, 2019, by Carroll Messer (cj [dot] messer [at] att [dot] net)

I agree with Gene McCluney, regarding the location of the Beale Wagon Road iron bridge across the Sans Bois in 1859. My research indicates that this bridge was the fourth of six (from Ft. Smith) Whipple patent cast and wrought iron arch truss (a bowstring) bridges built for the federal government by A. & P. Roberts, Philadelphia, PA in 1859-60. It had a main span of 100-feet. It was demolished late in the Civil War. Its remains are inundated by Robert S. Kerr Reservoir.

4. Sans Bois Creek, 0.6 miles northwest of Iron Bridge, Haskell Co. OK., (100 ft. span), [ 35 14.54 N, 94 58.02 W ], T9N, R22E, Sec. 22;

https://glorecords.blm.gov/details/survey/default.aspx?dm_id...

Whipple bowstring example: https://bridgehunter.com/ny/albany/whipple/

Posted February 6, 2019, by Carroll Messer (cj [dot] messer [at] att [dot] net)

A newspaper correspondent (The Wanderer) of the Philadelphia Press visited the construction of the Beale Wagon Road in Indian Territory during the Summer and Fall of 1859. He visited the Little River iron bridge site twice, around Sept. 1 and Oct. 1, 1859, as he rode out from Fort Smith thru Indian Territory and returned. He saw the bridge in early construction and nearing completion (only the wood flooring remained to be added). He wrote:

“The Little River bridge is a beautiful structure. It crosses the river at the narrowest part. The banks are very high, and it leaps from the solid masonry close to one, to the other, with a spring as airy and as light as the skip of a fairy.

One arch of iron was stretched, and then they (the Indians) laughed—"Ha! ha! It t’aint wide enough for our ponies "—those (Indians), who had never seen a bridge, deeming the (single) arch was the bridge.

Now (on his return) both arches are up, and the roadways are levelled to the road-way of the bridge, the structure excites unbounded admiration.”

Thus, we see that: (1) the support masonry piers were located away from the steep river banks (as are seen today at Little River; (2) two iron arches hold up the bridge; (3) each arch is individually free standing on its two support masonry piers (as Whipple arches were); (4) the assembled bridge is a beautiful structure (as Whipple arch bridges were frequently noted to be).

The bridge was not a Whipple-Murphy frame-truss bridge, but has a visibly curved cast-iron arch, wider at the ends than at the top, connected to the river banks by near-horizontal ramps.

Posted February 6, 2019, by Carroll Messer (cj [dot] messer [at] att [dot] net)

1. Correct spelling is Emachaya Creek (USGS)

2. One of six Whipple cast and wrought iron arch truss bridges (50-foot span) was built here in 1859 for federal-sponsored Beale Wagon Road by A & P Roberts & Co. of Philadelphia, PA. All six bridges were destroyed during the Civil War.

Posted February 4, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thanks for the updated photos Jay!

Nathan was correct in that this bridge was bypassed with a new bridge on a straightened alignment. So just maybe this bridge can be given a new use in the near future.

Posted January 31, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Another example of an overpriced slab along with a little pavement and striping to make it look like an important highway... All on a road that is little more than a dirt trail that if accurate sees 100 cars a day!

I've seen this more times than I care to remember!

Posted January 31, 2019, by H HARRIS (hayden [dot] harris35 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Bridge is in great shape, although I would say it is almost impossible to get to by vehicle. If you're up for a hike, it is a pretty cool sight.

Posted January 29, 2019, by Marvelle Sivard

Eagle Fork Bridge. Big Eagle bridge was at Octavia, about 9 miles away.

Posted January 26, 2019, by Ron Woods (Ronaldwoods4 [at] aol [dot] com)

Trees like this growing up through this old bridge will eventually overtake it!

Posted January 4, 2019, by AUSTIN HELLWIG (THE_HELLWIGFAMILY [at] ATT [dot] NET)

This bridge actually was on Yale Avenue near 138th Street (138th and Sheridan, essentially, would be in the Arkansas River). The bridge reopened in 1986 following a rerouting of the creek to the north of the embankment and construction of a new roadway on that grade. The bridge is open today, but Yale Avenue ends a few blocks north at the Kimberly-Clark plant.

Posted January 4, 2019, by AUSTIN HELLWIG (THE_HELLWIGFAMILY [at] ATT [dot] NET)

This bridge actually was on Yale Avenue near 138th Street (138th and Sheridan, essentially, would be in the Arkansas River). The bridge reopened in 1986 following a rerouting of the creek to the north of the embankment and construction of a new roadway on that grade. The bridge is open today, but Yale Avenue ends a few blocks north at the Kimberly-Clark plant.

Posted December 30, 2018, by Luke
Posted December 30, 2018, by Daniel

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_River_Bridge_War I believe this is the free bridge mentioned in this article. I don't know how close the toll bridge was.

Posted December 26, 2018, by M Cox

Add my voice to both of yours. SAVE THIS BRIDGE!!!!!!!! Anything new?

Posted November 23, 2018, by Wanda Black (Ken1201 [at] cox [dot] net)

Loved swimming in the creek when I was little with my daddy.My uncle had a little grocery store in Calhoun an went to church in Calhoun about 60 years ago.

Posted October 17, 2018, by Jay Bissell (jay_54714 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I grew up in this area. Locally, this is/was known as Lindsey Mayes Bridge. I remember back in the 60's when I was a kid, one span collapsed into the river due to an overweight truck pulling a dozer on a trailer. I could always tell which span was the replacement because it was silver while the others were rusty red. If you look at some of the older pic's or Google Earth Streetview, you can still see the difference. It was the span that is in the river now.

There was also a park at the north end, on the west side of the road. It had picnic tables, grills, etc. It is abandoned and overgrown now.

Posted October 14, 2018, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

This one has been lost.

Posted September 29, 2018, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sadly, the old bridge is now gone. Replaced with a boring concrete slab. Taken 9/29/18

Posted September 23, 2018, by Rhys Martin (rhys [at] cloudlesslens [dot] com)

This bridge was rehabbed in 2017 in honor of its 100th birthday. It's looking great; new photo submitted.

Posted August 29, 2018, by Barb Shaw (shawb_53 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Ferry

Posted August 7, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted August 7, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted July 21, 2018, by Derek Nixon (nixon5thair [at] aol [dot] com)

The Parker Pony has been placed over it new home, a creek at State Hwy 51 and South 320 road on July 18, 2018.

Posted July 17, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

I hope they kept the original railing look.

Posted July 17, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge has recently been rehabilitated

Posted July 4, 2018, by Luke

The pictured 1958 Topo from historicaerials shows US 66 (Highlighted in red.) crossing this bridge, not the modern routing to the north.

Posted July 4, 2018, by JS (jwsafranek [at] verizon [dot] net)

That's not the old 66 bridge over Bear, the 66 route it is too the north of I-40, marked E 1030 Rd on the map. The pic you have is the bridge over Bear on the old service road, and not Route 66.

Posted June 29, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge is currently under refurbishment one lane at a time: new pavement, new railings

Posted June 19, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I attempted to visit this bridge, but it no longer exists. NBI shows it was removed between 2008 and 2012.

Posted June 19, 2018, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

I visited this bridge 6-16-18. It is now barricaded and posted as Bridge Closed.

Posted May 30, 2018, by Neal Boatright (nealboat [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The picture you have posted at top of page is on our private property not a county road.

Posted May 30, 2018, by Ann Marie Ryals (annmarieryals [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is located on private property, not a county road, and is not open to traffic. The road and bridge are privately maintained.

Posted May 30, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted May 30, 2018, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge in the comments. Is a different bridge

Posted May 20, 2018, by Mark James (psjmdj [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I remember waiting on the red light to get across this bridge.

Posted May 19, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Judging by photo 4, I'm going to say that this was a relocated railroad bridge.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Tony Anderson (scout2tony [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited site today, 19 May 2018. New concrete bridge in place.

Posted May 17, 2018, by As info

Laara how wide is span you need to cross? Makes HUGE difference in cost. If 50 feet or less can span with a semi trailer for about 900 dollars DIY.

Posted May 17, 2018, by larae brown (laraeok [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Are any of these bridges for sale? We have land in Cleveland county out on Stella Road and have a large canyon we'd like to span. If some are for sale, please give me an idea as to price and possible delivery.

Posted May 13, 2018, by Curtis Hudson

As of Google Earth's imagery of 3/12/18, this bridge is blocked off.

Posted April 30, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It looks like the replacement bridge is composed of salvaged/reused beams. I think I see some old rivets on them. Not that this makes any difference, just an observation.

Posted April 29, 2018, by Dwayne Hendrickson (okiedokiegames [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge has been replaced. I don't know when it was replaced.

Posted April 19, 2018, by Tannie Olsen (tannieolsen [at] gmail [dot] com)

I notice that you don't have a picture of the Midland Valley Trestle over Myers Creek. I have attached a color photograph of the bridge. I expect the photo to be credited to the Tannie Olsen photo collection and you do have my permission to post it as part of your website. If you have any questions, I would be more than happy to answer them.

Tannie Olsen

Posted April 11, 2018, by Tuck John Porter (designertjp [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hello Folks! These are great Pecan Creek Bridge Pics and sure do bring back memories! Used to come here every Summer, back in the 60's just around the corner near Black Jack Baptist Church. To Photographer Gene McCluney, your "from-the-ditch-view" was exceptionally brazen! Weren't you afraid of stepping on a Cottonmouth Water Moccasin or something? I came thru here in 2016 to attend a Family Clan Funeral, and noticed the new Bridge here is completely open to the sky (smile). And wider!

Posted April 1, 2018, by Anonymous

YOW!!! KILLER discovery!!

Posted March 31, 2018, by J Lance (bugo [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Here is a mostly complete archive of Oklahoma state highway maps:

http://www.okladot.state.ok.us/maps/state/archive-a.htm

Here is an archive of different types of maps, mostly of Oklahoma including some historic county road maps:

https://dc.library.okstate.edu/digital/collection/OKMaps/sea...

Posted March 25, 2018, by Jay Bissell

This bridge has been replaced.

Posted March 24, 2018, by david (davidbonifazi [at] earthlink [dot] net)

Sadly, this bridge has been replaced by a modern concrete on steel beam bridge

Posted March 17, 2018, by Carl Edmundson (cfe [at] att [dot] net)

Actually these old bridges are/were on Verdigris River. I grew up around there for over 60 years. Looking closely at Google maps it shows Bird Creek turning back north and tying into Navigation Channel, the old Verdigris River channel is much wider than Bird Creek.

Posted March 6, 2018, by Matthew Lane Siegmann (clarinetboy [at] netscape [dot] net)

The road this bridge is on is officially signed MacArthur Blvd. That road originally linked Marshall (to the north) and Lovell (to the south). The road currently T's with E0650 Rd, but originally continued strait south for about a half mile before crossing west over the railroad tracks and continuing on south to E0660 Rd and Lovell. I'm not sure when this span of road was closed though. As of today the bridge is still there and open to traffic. Very pretty drive.

Posted February 19, 2018, by Luke

Road.

Posted February 19, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Did this carry RR or Street?

Posted February 19, 2018, by Bill Hughes (whughes2 [at] suddenlink [dot] net)

Looking for images of Spaulding Bridge Muskogee Oklahoma Built by Vincennes Bridge round 1910

Posted February 5, 2018, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is now gone.

Posted February 4, 2018, by Jay Bissell

This bridge is not lost. The old bridge still exists just south of the newer one.

Posted February 4, 2018, by Jay Bissell

This bridge was replaced, 2017.

Posted January 25, 2018, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this old span 1/21/18. New bridge alongside is almost completed. The old bridge is in pretty poor shape, not sure if they'll leave it.

Posted January 1, 2018, by Libby Collins Roe (antiquestitch [at] att [dot] net)

if I'm not mistaken my daddy took us swimming here before when we were little kids. We always wanted to go swimming here in the summer and just loved it. My dad was raised in Shady Point Oklahoma, not far from there. Sweet pictures!

Posted December 28, 2017, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

Here's a video from ODOT re: the removal and transport of this bridge: https://vimeo.com/248371961#

Posted December 25, 2017, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

This bridge is not lost, it is placed in storage to be used as part of a trail. See: http://www.route66world.com/states/oklahoma-states/historic-...

Posted November 21, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Sorry I guess I forgot to post this information, but Scott Sundermeyer at ODOT gave me some good news about this bridge as follows:

The bridge is being adopted by a private citizen, Scot Underwood. The bridge is scheduled to be moved to a location just off SH-11and 136th Street in Skiatook. Google Earth image attached. The work to remove the bridge will take place sometime near Thanksgiving.

Posted November 21, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Well that is a shame. These K-Parker trusses are very rare outside of Oklahoma. Thus, they all have National significance As far as I am concerned.

Granted, these are not the oldest trusses in the United States, but that does not degrade their significance. These K-Parker trusses illustrate a type of experimentation that occurred in the latter half of the truss era. They are significant right along with pre 1900 pin connected trusses but for a different reason.

Posted November 20, 2017, by Terrie (oklahomes [at] aol [dot] com)

This bridge is now being replaced. 😩

Posted October 3, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

If the water was down you could motorboat right through that puppy!

Posted October 2, 2017, by Nick Schmiedeler

That Google image of the span in the river is awesome

Posted October 2, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Actually Gene. That was a false statement from the oldtimer. , the bridge was moved. And raised when the lake become a lake. I think they moved it in 1964. They actually moved it about 1/4 mile north. Or upriver from where it was. There is an island on south side of the bridge. It was just on the south end of that. Alot of people, think the bridge was up river where the old RR bridge embuttments are. But it wasnt.

Posted September 30, 2017, by John Marvig

Looks like a relocated and reused railroad bridge to me

Posted September 23, 2017, by Don Morrison

Historic maps show no tracks other than the present ones, so the train must've crossed the RR bridge near Rte 66 shortly before the head-on collision.

Posted September 22, 2017, by John Marvig

I may be reaching here, but it kinda looks like this one is narrow and heavy enough to have been a railroad bridge. Perhaps the previous comment also points to this?

Posted September 22, 2017, by denise riley (deniserriley [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Is this the bridge that was just passed over before the tragic train wreck of 1917? Or was the one closer to Hwy 66 the bridge?

Posted September 19, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Before someone comments about the dangers of kids being on this RR bridge, this bridge is a spur line, that use to go over to a near by plant thats been shut down for over 30 years, only use this bridge gets now is backed up traffic as they add some cars. So not much chance of getting caught on the bridge.

Posted September 17, 2017, by Mark Brown (markwbrown66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Bridge has been replaced, with new bridge, old bridge no longer exists.

Posted September 11, 2017, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Is there a reason to think this bridge ever carried the Jefferson Highway?

Posted July 17, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

If you look at Google Streetview from 2013, you can see the remains of this bridge on a sandbar in the river.

Posted July 15, 2017, by David Cathey (david [dot] cathey59 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Visited this one in July 2017. Deck appears to have been recently refurbished.

Posted July 11, 2017, by Calvin Sneed (us43137415 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan, please add my voice to yours. Definitely an American treasure worth of restoration and preservation.

Posted June 23, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Bridge has been replaced by UCEB. As of 6-22-2017, paving of the new road is still underway

Posted June 12, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

It was still a worthwhile visit, because now we know it is a product of the Canton Bridge Company due to the portal bracing design. Nice work!

Posted June 12, 2017, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nice find! Looks like a Canton Bridge Co. product to me. I don't know of any other company that used that X style cresting.

Posted June 12, 2017, by Debbie Yell (dkyell [at] gmail [dot] com)

Really overgrown, so couldn't get a good picture.

Posted May 30, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

No NBI info available. Bridge dates have been obliterated

Posted May 30, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

Date is uncertain. The original listing had this along modern-day US 69. Although I corrected the coordinates, the NBIseems to have no info on this bridge.

Posted May 30, 2017, by Robert (priddy74464 [at] gmail [dot] com)

There building a new bridge along the side of this one. So this will be removed in the near future. All the old iron bridges are far and few anymore.

Posted May 13, 2017, by Rhys Martin (rhysfunk [at] gmail [dot] com)

Stopped by today; the new bridge is completed and the old bridge is, indeed, open to pedestrian traffic.

Posted May 8, 2017, by Anonymous

Low Clearance Barrier

Posted May 1, 2017, by David Backlin (us71 [at] cox [dot] net)

New bridge under construction immediately east of this bridge.

Posted April 21, 2017, by John Marvig

The issue that I see is the approach on one end was removed to make room for a park project a couple years back.

Posted April 21, 2017, by Anonymous

But if they would just fix up the historic bridge, they would be right on Target.