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Shawnee Bridge

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Lost Bridge over Great Miami River on East Main Street
Location
Piqua, Miami County, Ohio
Status
No longer exists
History
Built in 1886. West two spans lost to flood March 23rd 1898 when pier washed out. East span lost March 25th 1913
Builders
- Columbia Bridge Co.
- Columbia Bridge Works of Dayton, Ohio
Also called
Huntersville Bridge
Lorimer Bridge
East Main street
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.14542, -84.23804   (decimal degrees)
40°08'44" N, 84°14'17" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/735274/4447555 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 89764 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • June 29, 2020: Added by Art S.

Comments 

Shawnee Bridge
Posted July 5, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks Tony,

I'm a fan of most of the early builders but you're right, I have a special affinity for CBW. By the 1880s they were oldest bridge company in business. Together with Roebling, the last of the pre-civil war builders. In addition to their age was their innovation and diversity.

They built:

- stone arches,

- wood/covered bridges,

- all sorts or innovative iron trusses,

- suspension bridges,

and I have evidence that they built railroad bridges as well as road bridges. In my opinion, they were the most diverse of all bridge builders, exceeding even Bollman.

Considering D.H. Morrison was born in 1817, he was in his mid 60s when he died in 1882. I'm not sure I would consider that to be young for the 1800s.

Although he wasn't young, I think David Morrison's death was untimely for both for him and CBW. The company was spooling up well during the last years of his life. They may have missed a beat as a result of the reorganization caused by his passing. His sons did well and remained innovative throughout the decade but were smaller than King and WIBCo.

I'm not sure if they were stretched thin because they were expanding to compete or another issue but the company wasn't able to survive a major incident, the Mather's Mills tragedy. This seems to have triggered the financial collapse.

I look forward to continuing our quest of long lost history!

Regards,

Art S.

Shawnee Bridge
Posted June 30, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Thank you Art for your interest in CBW, and relentlessness in finding some of the answers! They were without doubt one of the most unique and innovative firms of their time, and I expect many more lost spans remain to be found. I've always felt that if David Morrison hadn't died at a relatively young age, his company might well have prospered for much longer than it did. I've been a fan ever since my visit to the Tom's Run Bridge many years ago.

So we'll keep looking for them... and keep the banter going! 😜

And yes, so far your track record is pretty impressive! 😎

Shawnee Bridge
Posted June 30, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Thanks to both of you!

We still need too fill in a lot of details, but a least we're on the right track.

Regards to both,

Art S.

Shawnee Bridge
Posted June 29, 2020, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, I'm Thrilled you solved the mystery. Thanks for letting me help. It was fun as always.

Shawnee Bridge
Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

And this is why I'm behind in my work and probably won't sleep enough tonight. But it was fun!

Found it in a book called "First Century of Piqua, Ohio"

along with two Columbia Bridge Co.

Must admit, I was quite surprised how accurate my 'educated guess,' based on Melissa's finds, was.

There are a ton of other bridges in the book if someone wants to post them. I'm probably done for the night - 3 CBW confirmations is enough for the day... :^)

Regards,

Art S.

Shawnee Bridge
Posted June 29, 2020, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Glad I inspired you! 😜

Shawnee Bridge
Posted June 29, 2020, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Solved it!