Rating:
10 votes

Gallman Road Bridge

Photos 

Overview

Photo taken 2005 by Gregory S. Hamilton

BH Photo #108335

Map 

Facts 

Overview
Through truss bridge over Raccoon Creek on a pedestrian trail in Newark
Location
Licking County, Ohio
Status
Open to pedestrians only
History
Built 1887 by the Columbia Bridge Works over St. Mary's River in Mercer County; relocated in 2002
Builders
- Columbia Bridge Co. of Dayton, Ohio
- Columbia Bridge Works of Dayton, Ohio
Design
Wrought-iron, pin-connected, 11-panel Whipple through truss
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 152.0 ft.
Total length: 202.0 ft.
Deck width: 12.0 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.05029, -82.47398   (decimal degrees)
40°03'01" N, 82°28'26" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/374271/4434379 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Newark
Inventory numbers
ODOT 5457467 (Ohio Dept. of Transportation structure file number)
BH 27865 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • April 12, 2017: New photo from Art Suckewer
  • February 25, 2010: Updated by Anthony Dillon: Added GPS coordinates
  • October 6, 2005: Posted photos from Gregory S. Hamilton

Sources 

Comments 

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 9, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Matt,

If you hit me over the head enough times, I may eventually get it...

Thanks for bearing with me.

Regards,

Art S.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 9, 2014, by Matt Lohry

Art,

We understand what you're saying, and we agree 100%. Take a look at the new plaque in pic #5, NOT #4--this is the plaque I'm referring to...they spelled "COUMBUS"...it's supposed to be "COLUMBIA". That's the issue here.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 8, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

Upon David Morison's (the founder of Columbia Bridge Works) death in 1882, the company was passed to his sons and renamed Columbia Bridge Co. The factory continued to operate in Dayton, Ohio. The plaques in picture 4 say: (upper) "Columbia Bridge Works Dayton O" (lower) "The Columbia Bridge Co., Successors to D.H. & C.C. Morrison".

In other words, any Columbia Bridge Works bridge made after 1882, while labeled as Columbia Bridge Works and to the same designs and style, made in the same factory (upper plaque, seen in picture 4) was technically built by the Columbia Bridge Co. (lower plaque).

Regards,

Art S.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 7, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

The plaque that Matt was referring to is the one in pic #5 that was placed on the railing after the bridge was moved from Mercer County. The builder is incorrectly identified as the Columbus Bridge Company of Dayton.

Unfortunately I see this happen all the time on these modern plaques as hearsay information is not verified. In this case it was a simple act of carelessness as the builder is clearly identified on the historic plaques.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 7, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

Look carefully at picture 4 and read the transcription to it's right.

Regards,

ArtS.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 7, 2014, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It must be an Ohio thing then... cause we don't narrow them here in Indiana.

Art, Matt is speaking of the new plaque that was placed after the bridge was relocated. It is incorrect in that it states "Columbus Bridge Company", which was a completely different firm that operated out of the state capitol.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 6, 2014, by Julie Bowers (jbowerz1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

It has to do with the 85 per sq. Ft that pedestrian loading requires. Our engineer has figured out loading that works to prevent the skunny. Its not a non sensical law...it is engineers that aren't willing to look a little further or use tge lowest numbers possible in their modeling because they dont know.

There are ways....

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 6, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Matt,

I have recently learned that "Columbia Bridge Works" became "Columbia Bridge Co." with the death of its founder David H. Morrison in 1882 but continued using the "Columbia Bridge Works" sign - look at picture 4 above and it is explained.

It's still the same company and the same product so the category should not be subdivided here but it does explain why the plaque is correct.

Regards,

Art S.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted June 6, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

My understanding is that there is some nonsensical law that requires this. I don't know if the rule/law is tied to money or liability but I agree with you that it is silly.

Regards,

Art S.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted February 24, 2012, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I just wish they wouldn't narrow these trusses when they convert them to pedestrian use. It's like the bridge width has to match that of the trail, when in reality a wider and more historically accurate span is more appealing.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted February 24, 2012, by Matt Lohry

The folks who put the plaque on the railing need to fix the builder name--they put "Columbus Bridge Company" rather than "Columbia Bridge Works" on it.

Gallman Road Bridge
Posted February 23, 2012, by Wayne Grodkiewicz (wgrodkiewi [at] aol [dot] com)

Here are some shots of the Gallman Road Bridge from 18 February 2012