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Henry Street Bridge

Photos 

Henry Street Bridge

Photo from old postcard

Enlarge

BH Photo #488450

Description 

Likely around 600 feet long as the current bridge, which reuses the old piers, consists of four 150-foot spans.

Facts 

Overview
Lost Pratt through truss bridge over Maumee River on Henry Street in Florida.
Location
Florida, Henry County, Ohio
Status
Replaced by a new bridge
History
Built 1883; Replaced 1973; stone piers reused for replacement bridge
Builder
- Massillon Bridge Co. of Massillon, Ohio
Design
4-span, pin-connected Pratt through truss
Also called
Florida Bridge
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.32077, -84.19980   (decimal degrees)
41°19'15" N, 84°11'59" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/734367/4578149 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 91874 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Categories 

19th Century (9,225)
9-panel truss (290)
Built 1883 (184)
Built during 1880s (2,326)
Florida, Ohio (2)
Henry County, Ohio (41)
Lost (30,559)
Lost 1973 (105)
Lost during 1970s (1,025)
Massillon Bridge Co. (166)
Maumee River (63)
Ohio (4,874)
One-lane traffic (8,048)
Owned by county (21,818)
Pin-connected (5,202)
Pratt through truss (6,293)
Pratt truss (10,641)
Replaced by new bridge (20,804)
Through truss (18,216)
Truss (37,251)

Update Log 

  • March 3, 2022: New photos from Paul Plassman
  • December 1, 2021: Updated by Tony Dillon: Updated information
  • December 1, 2021: New photos from Melissa Brand-Welch
  • November 30, 2021: New photo from Art Suckewer
  • November 19, 2021: New photo from Geoff Hubbs
  • October 12, 2021: Updated by Paul Plassman: Added categories "Pin-connected", "One-lane traffic", "9-panel truss"
  • September 17, 2021: Updated by Art Suckewer: added builder and build date range based on portal bracing design.
  • September 17, 2021: Updated by Paul Plassman: Added truss type and description
  • January 10, 2021: New photo from Geoff Hubbs

Sources 

  • Geoff Hubbs
  • Paul Plassman
  • Art Suckewer - Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com
  • Melissa Brand-Welch - melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com
  • Tony Dillon - spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com

Comments 

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 2, 2021, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, y'all are cracking me up.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 2, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The Bat Signal worked, Melissa is on the case!

Thanks Melissa!

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Yes, excellent work, Melissa! Good to have confirmation.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony. A pleasure as always.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Nice work as always Melissa!

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Yes, destroyed by ice in February 1883. No earth shattering information to add. Just confirmation.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

It does appear that the 1883 flood was rather severe and may have taken out a good number of spans in Northwest Ohio.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Paul Plassman

And also, I recall that there was a bad ice jam/flood in Toledo in early 1883 that took out the Cherry Street Bridge there....same disaster here maybe?

Henry Street Bridge
Posted December 1, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

...And yes Art, Melissa is fabulous!

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 30, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yup... My money goes with a typo and that it was built after the previous structure was lost... in 1883. It matches up perfectly with a Massillon design that would have been completed shortly thereafter. And those still in use abuts may well have come from that earlier bridge.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 30, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Paul,

Also, remember, we just learned from the Tiffin material that a significant flood that took out a number of bridges occurred on Feb. 5, 1883.

I'm curious as to what will turn up if Melissa gets on the case or if we point the Society in this direction.

Regards,

Art S.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 30, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Paul,

Glad I could help.

Unless a historic society has a Melissa, they get it a bit off a large percentage of the time. Even so, the info is directionally correct and very valuable.

The interesting thing is that as this database grows, we're not only gaining knowledge about individual bridges but trends, such as portal design progression. I suspect that soon we'll be able to identify and date many more of the ponies.

This database is also more tangibly showing how few remain of what once was; and how important the remaining bridges are.

Regards,

Art S.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 30, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Thanks, Art!

I was thinking somewhat along the same lines after staring at the photo for awhile and looking at other Massillon bridges. The Facebook photo looks like the Henry Street site and no other bridge in the area was washed out in 1893 as far as I know, so I would hazard a guess that the location is right, but the date has one digit wrong (1883). As we saw with Tiffin's Market Street Bridge, it wouldn't be the first time even a historical society slightly erred on a year!

Paul

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 30, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Paul,

I'm not sure I can give you a 100% answer without other evidence.

What I can say is that most of these companies had certain design ques for each period. All of the Massillon bridges with this portal design that have a known build date were made between 1883 and 1885. I doubt this deign was built before 1883 but it is possible that the portal design remained an option or could be 'special ordered' later than 1885.

An example of this is Harrisburg, PA's Walnut Street Bridge

https://bridgehunter.com/pa/dauphin/walnut-street/ it is well documented as having been made in 1890 but it has a cast iron portal brace design that was superseded in 1887. I haven't yet found an answer to the reason for this anomaly.

If I was to place a bet, I'd bet the link either refers to another location or the society got he date wrong.

Regards,

Art S.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 30, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Art (or anyone who has some thoughts on the matter):

This Henry County Historical Society photo says that a bridge at Florida was destroyed in 1893....which would likely make the bridge on this page an 1893-1894 creation. Do you think this is a late example of this style of Massillon portals or that the date from the historical society is wrong (perhaps 1883)?

https://www.facebook.com/99501679118/photos/a.428521914118/1...

Henry Street Bridge
Posted November 19, 2021, by Paul Plassman

That's a nice one! First color photo I've seen of this span.

I'm impressed by the size of those stone piers. Interesting that they appear to be built substantially wider than the trusses....even wide enough to support the modern two-lane bridge.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted September 18, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

And WIBCo. and Keystone and Penn. and the Roeblings, with a Berlin with a minor fling with Variety 8-)

Uh oh...

Don't worry CBW will always be my first love. For atonement, I've reworked https://bridgehunter.com/oh/trumbull/south-main-street/ and added a more worthy pic.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted September 17, 2021, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

You cheating on CBW and the Morrisons with Massillon Art? 😜

Henry Street Bridge
Posted September 17, 2021, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Looks like an 1883-1885 Massillon product to me.

Regards,

Art S.

Henry Street Bridge
Posted September 17, 2021, by Paul Plassman

Neat photo! I had always wondered what the old bridge at Florida looked like. The portals are rather unusual and utilitarian looking.