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Posted June 3, 2018, by Jessica Phillips (jesslayton91 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Is it haunted?

If so, what's the story?

Posted May 22, 2018, by Homer

I remember walking across this bridge and it would shake when you walked across . It was kind of scary it got worse and worse. I didn't go across it the summer of 93 then I seen it on the news that it collapsed. I know where the Reed Bridge sign is should be worth something someday.

Posted May 19, 2018, by Kelly (wildbilly0690 [at] hotmail [dot] com)

38į36'11.2"N 82į40'15.0"W

I found the coordinates on www.historicaerials.com of the abandoned tunnel

Posted May 16, 2018, by Charles W McDowell (cwire44 [at] att [dot] net)

This bridge is not on the Germantown Rd! It crossed the Miami & Erie canal just north of the downtown area at today's junction of Verity Parkway (former canal) with Tytus Ave to the northeast and Main st to the southwest. In addition to the highway it also carried the electric traction line over the canal.

Posted May 13, 2018, by Art S (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Chester,

Great find!

John,

I'd guess that the truss dates from the late 1860s to the late 1870s.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 13, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Chester, tremendous find! wonder if other side in a farm building near by.....

Posted May 13, 2018, by John Marvig (marvigj27 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow! What a treat! Hopefully this one isnít too far gone to be restored. Anyone have any idea of the date for this tiny structure? I donít know a lot about bowstrings, but Iíve gotta imagine it dates to the 1880s or so

Posted May 13, 2018, by Brian Manville

Nice find, Chester! I would love to know what it looked like when it was built.

Posted May 4, 2018, by Douglas Butler

No don't think so

Posted May 4, 2018, by Stephanie (stephforce [at] aol [dot] com)

Does anyone know if you can walk on the lower deck?

Posted May 2, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The Singing Bridge under siege----floods from 1937,1948,1949,1952, and 1964.

Posted April 27, 2018, by roger meade (rmvlogs18 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Me and a few friends have been there and looked around and it was very cool. Believe it or not we even jumped off of it . We jumped from the top part and it was scary. I have a friend named Nixon and he is about 350 pounds and he even jumped from the very top part.

Posted April 25, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

100% replacement of superstructure/main span = replacement. That has been a standard on this website (and mine) for a long time. Moreover, the composition of the built-up beams in the replacement truss do not match the historic truss, which further differs this project from heavy rehabs of bridges in Chicago where sometimes up to 90% of the truss spans have been replaced, albeit with near exact replicas with exception of rivets. http://www.americanbridge.net/featured-projects/columbus-roa...

Posted April 25, 2018, by Douglas Butler

The lift span was replaced by a lift span same 2013 to the two towers correct and painted green then in service I'm from Cleveland the proof is in the pudding that the Columbus road bridge is still in use for vehicles

Posted April 25, 2018, by Luke

This bridge only had one span. That span was replaced in 2013. That means (drumroll) that the bridge is lost.

Furthermore, the "superstructure replaced" status option that Amanda herself used is nested below "demolished" in the dropdown box. So, by the webmaster's own standards, the bridge is lost.

It's lost. It should be marked as such.

Posted April 25, 2018, by Douglas Butler

Luke

This bridge is not lost or removed this bridge was painted green after a few years of the lift span replaced with another lift span, this bridge is still in use for vehicle traffic.

Posted April 24, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

You are more correct than you may know. Section 106 has just started with this bridge to "address safety concerns associated with the bridge" which means the bridge either is likely going to be repaired or demolished in the future.

Posted April 24, 2018, by Brian B (mr [dot] bonnough [at] yahoo [dot] com)

She's getting older everyday, soon there will be nothing left. I took a DRONE flight over it yesterday and wanted to share it with someone who appreciated it.

https://youtu.be/p3ExqJb7sOk

Posted April 22, 2018, by Debi Carter (Debistepp [at] gmail [dot] com)

I know now , that this was a very stupid thing to do, but back in the 70's, my two girlfriends and I jumped off of this bridge and swam to the side of the Little Miami river. It was a very hot summer and just something a lot of the kids were doing at the time for lack of anything else to do. I do believe that there were some others down there with us also, I just can't remember who it was so very long ago, but I do distinctly remember my two girlfriends being there. My name was Debi Link at the time.

I also remember my toes hitting the dirt at the bottom of the river, thank goodness that was all that hit the bottom!

Just thought I'd share this with you! So glad to have an awesome picture of the bridge now!

Posted April 22, 2018, by Debi Carter (Debistepp [at] gmail [dot] com)

I know now , that this was a very stupid thing to do, but back in the 70's, my two girlfriends and I jumped off of this bridge and swam to the side of the Little Miami river. It was a very hot summer and just something a lot of the kids were doing at the time for lack of anything else to do. I do believe that there were some others down there with us also, I just can't remember who it was so very long ago, but I do distinctly remember my two girlfriends being there. My name was Debi Link at the time.

I also remember my toes hitting the dirt at the bottom of the river, thank goodness that was all that hit the bottom!

Just thought I'd share this with you! So glad to have an awesome picture of the bridge now!

Posted April 18, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Nathan, Yeah, I hate to see little hidden treasures like this one go. Seems if they're not being torn down by idiots then they're dying from neglect. I must admit this one captivated the imagination a little, picturing what was U.S. 68 once upon a time crossing this. I would be curious to know when this was by-passed, much like I wish I had more info on the history of it's cousin down in Higginsport. At least the Higginsport Bridge does not seem to have the abutment issues this one did, but it has been engulfed by many a flood. I have to wonder what hope there is for abandoned structures like these?

Posted April 17, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Rick,

The loss of the bridge is tragic and extremely disappointing. However it is possible the county has left the remains there in an attempt to confirm whether any of the wrought iron (highly valued by blacksmiths and researchers) is desired by anyone. ODOT is making an active effort to foster better communication with counties about their historic bridges so the status of bridges can be better maintained and interested individuals can be kept up-to-date on any updates.

Posted April 16, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)
Posted April 15, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have to admit I didn't think this bridge would last long the last time I visited---the abutment was clearly close to failure. With all the remains still on the bank a month and a half later, I'll assume nobody wants to be responsible for an abandoned bridge?

Posted April 4, 2018, by Sandor Gulyas (sgulya1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Morrow County, with financial assistance from Ohio Dept. of Transportation, will be replacing this bridge in 2018.

Posted March 29, 2018, by Steven D. Huelskamp (stevendhuelskamp [at] gmail [dot] com)

Bridge is now used by Chicago, Fort Wayne & Eastern Railroad.

Posted March 29, 2018, by Steven D. Huelskamp (stevendhuelskamp [at] gmail [dot] com)

I went through St. Marys the other month and this bridge has been removed. Growing up in St. Marys, I crossed this bridge many of times!

Posted March 26, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Found what appears to be a March 9, 2018 update:

http://www.theintelligencer.net/news/top-headlines/2018/03/u...

Quote from the Article: "The price of metal ďhas gone up quite a bitĒ in recent years, and a local recycler who has done similar work could likely be willing to take on the work of salvaging the 5,200 tons of metal in the bridge, he said. The Bellaire Bridge is actually constructed of a higher grade metal that is in demand, according to Longwell."

A higher grade metal on this historic bridge... You know, you think they would learn something from a statement like that. But as they still plan to demolish the bridge, I guess not.

Posted March 26, 2018, by Todd D Walker (mrwalk50 [at] gmail [dot] com)

This is an image of a postcard of a very familiar bridge from my childhood. The current concrete box replacement is showing deterioration as said over the years in the local paper. Defiance is replacing the Clinton Street bridge showing similar deterioration next year. I see the current Hopkins Street bridge the next project

Posted March 22, 2018, by Tom Hoffman

The bridge has been closed due to an accident on Tuesday night. Apparently a vehicle lost control hitting one of the vertical posts. The radio report said the bridge should be closed until further notice and repairs can be made.

Posted March 16, 2018, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

Here's a link to a video about the history of the bridges in that location. http://www.scorphq.com/YouTube/pg.php?v=hs4ZXHbB30E

Posted March 14, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

In the angled picture there are clearly no supports for the bridge, but when it was demolished there were two piers like the modern bridge has. I would assume the piers became necessary by the semis that used to pound 52 back in the 60's and 70's, which might also account for its relatively short lifespan.

Posted March 14, 2018, by rick shelton (shltn [dot] rck66 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I would love to know the story behind this picture. In looking at the dirt road that is now U.S. 52, I wonder if this could be the opening of the bridge?

Posted March 12, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)
Posted March 5, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

Unusual to see closed spandrel arches in this configuration.

Posted March 5, 2018, by David Case

This is such a wonderful bridge in a very scenic setting. Massive stone abutments. The bridge appears to be unaltered since its original build.

Posted March 4, 2018, by Robert Harris (rharr73 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Found a map from 1896 listing this crossing as Canal St. Itís a shame the builder plaques have been removed.

Posted March 3, 2018, by Mike Tewkesbury (gb_packards [at] yahoo [dot] com)

The bridge was built after the 1913 flood.

Posted March 1, 2018, by Anonymous

.

Posted March 1, 2018, by Paul Farrier (paulfarrier [at] gmail [dot] comm)

Old and new pictures show an arch. A multiple kingpost with an arch is called a Burr Arch. Why isn't this bridge a Burr Arch?

The bridge was being used as a carriage house when I visited it. Is this a public or privately owned bridge?

Posted March 1, 2018, by darrell roberts (who [at] tec1000 [dot] com)

silly nick names is an insult to the people who the landmark was to honer,

at least give the real name top billing

but if you want to give landmarks silly nicknames I have a list of ideas

we can call Paul brown stadium SUCKER STADIUM

and the Brent Spence bridge the Perkins Pancake bridge

John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge the - white castle bridge

and how about we call the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge policeman's leap

I understand that we have a lot of people that only have a 6th grad education and

things like the names of places and landmarks is too much for them to grasp but I hold

journalist to a higher standard as I think that they would want me to.

So why can't they set a good example and get the names correct ?

Posted February 26, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The email exchange mentioned the county was waiting for the water level to go down to complete bridge removal suggesting the water level has been high, but I didn't receive actual confirmation that the floods caused the collapse. Even if they did there are multiple potential causes for a collapse during a flood.

Posted February 26, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Nathan did a good photo documentation of this bridge for his website. When looking through his photos, I noticed that the abutments on this bridge were developing some serious cracks though I have certainly seen worse.

Was this area hit by flooding? I know they have had some rain back east. Regardless, this was a highly significant bridge and it's collapse represents a devastating loss.

Now, somebody is going to have an expensive environmental clean up.

Posted February 26, 2018, by Joe Yoman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Now that is just sad! It's bad enough we have mother nature and the various DOT's killing these off as it is but to have one just collapse is just wrong. Wonder what gave out to make the whole thing collapse like this.

Posted February 26, 2018, by Robert Elder (robertelder1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

TERRIBLE LOSS

Please, please don't let this happen to your bridge. There is nothing worse than finding a bridge in the water.

Posted February 26, 2018, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

According to the info and photo supplied by the county, this bridge collapsed on the night of February 18, 2018.

Posted February 24, 2018, by Jan Churgovich Bach (churkko [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Do you have any information as to when the original covered bridge was built and when it came down? My grandparents lived down the road. They moved there in the 1920's and I was wondering if the covered bridge was there then. Thanks for any info you can give.

Posted February 18, 2018, by chris riggsby (maripoppenz1963 [at] roadrunner [dot] com)

the covered bridge no longer exist it is a steel bridge just like the ones in the other two pics !

Posted February 5, 2018, by Donna Ross (etlingdross [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Been up and down #36 many times. Love old picture of the

bridge, and newer picture is just beautiful.

Posted January 30, 2018, by Matt Lohry

This was a full replacement for sure. I donít think it could get any uglier...

Posted January 30, 2018, by Mark Goudy (mark [dot] e [dot] goudy [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is actually just known as "Putnam Bridge". There was a public naming contest with Marquis de Lafayette Bridge being the runner-up.

Posted January 30, 2018, by Mark Goudy (mark [dot] e [dot] goudy [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge was replaced circa 2015. I'm not sure if the deck was replaced but the sides definitely were.

Posted January 26, 2018, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

NBI shows different build dates, 1895 and 1901, depending on the listing year.

Posted January 25, 2018, by Dana and Kay Klein

Many Thanks Luke!

Posted January 21, 2018, by Paul Holzsc (holzsc [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Hi, I posted my 1962 construction photos of the Hamline bridge at

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nikonimages/sets/7215766490592....

Any idea when I70 opened for traffic under the bridge?

Thanks,

Paul

Posted January 5, 2018, by Luke

There's now a trail below, with very maximum-security-prison-esque fencing.

Posted January 5, 2018, by Luke

Pretty sure the truss pictured in the postcard is the same as this one, which now exists as a private road bridge: https://bridgehunter.com/oh/lorain/bh54724/

Posted January 5, 2018, by Wade Logan (wadeloganart [at] gmail [dot] com)

Tony -

I live on Martin Hill, word from my neighbor the bridge is still in storage and that there were plans to reconstruct the bridge in its entirely as a display in Georgetown for the Brown County Fair.

Posted December 30, 2017, by Brandon Cooper

What is wrong with watching trains? Trains are relaxing.

Posted December 30, 2017, by Anonymous

Does someone have a problem with rail enthusiasts?

Posted December 29, 2017, by ice pont (sumatra)

Begone foamers!

Posted December 29, 2017, by Brandon Cooper

Looks like a perfect spot for railfanning.

Posted December 29, 2017, by Brandon Cooper

I really don't understand why Muskingum County neglected these two bridges, but it shows what happens when you neglect and have no crossing for many miles. If you want to cross the river by truck, you either have to go across at Zanesville or go to McConnellsville.

Posted December 26, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The county and ODOT are currently requesting SHPO reevaluation of this bridge for National Register Eligibility. It currently is listed as Ineligible, and are requesting it be eligible.

I added the builder and Agent from the company, and the local name for the bridge (at the time it was built) per county records forwarded to me by Tom Barrett at ODOT.

Posted December 22, 2017, by mike beadle (mbeadles [at] sssnet [dot] com)

I can not find western portal. Was it destroyed?

Posted December 16, 2017, by William Roha (billroha [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge is currently closed.

There are photos from September 2017 here:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Swartz+Bridge/@40.7706128,...

Posted December 14, 2017, by Erik Baldwin (chinacat1966 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

My apologies to Mike for claiming this was not the bridge he said it was. I mistook this bridge for a different PC RR one over Duck Creek-same abandoned right of way though. The one I was talking about is north of Whipple OH.

It is in the middle of a farmer's field near the intersection of T 16 and T 315 roads. Here is a picture I took from Google earth of it.

Posted December 10, 2017, by James McCray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Just added this one. On the view on Google Earth you can see where the abandoned alignment of US 40-National Road crosses a creek with a bridge. Now the old alignments of Nationl Road in this area are usually original arch bridges. So can one figure this out? Is this one of those?

Posted November 27, 2017, by Anonymous

There were 3 versions of the Putnam Bridge. 1st wasn't covered and lasted only 2 years. 1813/15.The 2nd version wasn't covered either & was destroyed by fire. The last version of the 3rd St Bridge,,(also known as the South St Bridge), was the only covered bridge built,,lost in 1913.

Posted November 25, 2017, by george oakley (georgeoakley49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I have to agree Wayne.Just looked and street view does not lie.

Posted November 25, 2017, by Wayne W Webster (wwwebste [at] gmail [dot] com)

Photo appears to actually show abandoned Lake Erie & Eastern bridge over Mahoning Ave.

Posted November 24, 2017, by Andy Brown (andman433 [at] gmail [dot] com)

The Straightening happened in 1994 when the bridge closed. To my knowledge, nothing of any value was unearthed when the new bridge went in. I walked the area as a teenager just about every night after the workers had left for the day. It really was a sight to see.

Posted October 22, 2017, by REX SHRYOCK (rshyrock [at] gmail [dot] com)

FAMILY HISTORICAL OVERVIEW: Farmland surrounding bridge was Shryock Farm from late 1880's until mid-1960's! My grandfather(Henry Rex Shryock) and grandmother (Mary Nelson Shryock) had two home births here-my father (Virgil Edwin Shryock)and uncle (Carl Nelson Shryock)! Was a working farm until 1920's but remained family property.

All family members carved their initials in the North side/ East end of bridge. Geographical/Historical Info: 1. Originally an Indian campgrounds for annual migrating area tribes. 2. From west end of bridge approx. 250 yds.was main house-some evidence of foundation may still be found. 3. From middle of bridge and due south on west side of creek-approx. 200 yds.was the animal barn;equipment shed;and maintenance shed.

4. From east end of bridge and approx.1000 yds.into NE hillside is a small coalmine that was used to heat buildings during the winter. 5. From east end of bridge and directly north 400-500 yds. was an illegal logging operation that was put out of business in early 1960's.

After a bitter land dispute between my grandfather;his sons;and stepmother(Garnet Shryock)...land left to his sons.Virgil later deeded his portion to Carl who sold out to a real estate investment co.in 1990's. 5. Was/is still included included in the Muskingham Valley Water Shed Project.

6. Approx. 6 mi.due South resided grandfather's sister (Gertrude Frye) and daughter (Viola Foley). Evidence of their home; barn;general store; and Columbiana gas well still exists! Viola was always proud to tell everyone that we were the lŗst of the Real Indians coming out of these hills!

Posted October 17, 2017, by Mike Tewkesbury (gb_packards [at] yahoo [dot] com)

I took this shot in March 2010.

Posted October 15, 2017, by Greg L (gleime [at] sssnet [dot] com)

I visited the tunnel today (10/15/2017). It's in good shape. Mainly dry inside the tunnel except near the entrances.

Posted October 6, 2017, by Tracy Risley (rolyatycart [at] aol [dot] com)

I got married at this bridge. It was amazing.

Posted September 15, 2017, by Lisa James (ivy76 [at] msn [dot] com)

Great pictures! I didn't know that there were memorial stones on the bridge; I'll have to go look at them. Unfortunately, the bridge is no longer open to automobile traffic (either over it or under it) for safety reasons. It is still open for foot traffic, though.

Posted September 14, 2017, by Kelvin Burgoon (kburgoon [at] columbus [dot] rr [dot] com)

This bridge was not burned, just replaced in 1967

Posted August 18, 2017, by Scott Trotel (rrhist [at] bright [dot] net)

The statements made about this bridge and cited from my book are grossly incorrect. My book makes no such statements and is taken out of context. This bridge was in the City of Troy, Ohio and was the North Market Street STREET BRIDGE. The D & T (Dayton & Troy Electric Railway) did NOT cross the Great Miami River at Troy at any time. The S T & P (Springfield, Troy & Piqua Railway) DID cross the Miami River on their own privately owned bridge to the immediate west of the STREET BRIDGE, and it is visible in the post card photo. It was opened in August 1905 and abandoned in October 1920 and subsequently removed circa 1922. It has no relationship to the August 6, 1932 collapse of the D & T bridge over the Miami River on the north side of Dayton, some 30 miles away. A photo of the two Troy bridges is attached, the North Market Street Bridge is on the left and the S T & P bridge is on the right. The photo dates circa 1919.

Posted August 8, 2017, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The two bridge photos on this page seem different. Also, Aaron Turner sent me this photo of yet another mystery Scioto River Bridge a while back, not sure where it was.

Posted August 6, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Jim, more often than not, historic bridges are named for the landowner at the time it was constructed. A date isn't given on here but I want to say this span date to around 1878. You could go to the Brown County Library or Historical Society and look for a County atlas from around that time to confirm it. The historic society can also reference his name and see if he had any provenance in the county.

Posted August 5, 2017, by Jim (bubby1611 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking for info on the man that this bridge is named after? Thanks

Posted August 4, 2017, by Jim (bubby1611 [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looking for info on the man that this bridge is named after? Thanks

Posted August 2, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

All of the data on this page was for the Sulphur Heights Hill Bridge that was just South of Sidney off of Main Avenue. Although the old East Bridge was obviously built by the same company (possibly the same year and maybe even under the same contract), the other data such as length and replacement date are wrong. The East Bridge needs to have a new page created and the picture moved so that the Sulphur Heights Hill Bridge can have it's page restored. I knew it had been on this site and wondered why I couldn't find it!

Posted July 27, 2017, by Mike Tewkesbury (gb_packards [at] yahoo [dot] com )

As of July 25, 2017

Posted July 25, 2017, by William Roha (billroha [at] gmail [dot] com)

July 2014 Streetview image shows this bridge open. Unless there was another accident after the 2011 accident that seems to be the reason this bridge is listed as closed.

Posted July 21, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Will, I read about this bridge many years ago and if I remember correctly it was originally built as a single-span Long truss. The contractors, I'll just call them BB&B, were summonsed back several times to make repairs. I believe they added the pier first and then added bracing that was supposed to "help" the structure settle onto the pier properly. I assume those bracing are what gives it a Childs appearance.

Posted July 21, 2017, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

I would not categorize this truss as a Childs, it is a Long variant.

Though it curiously has the Double Posts in Childs' patent (Unlike the Sherman variant "Childs" Trusses) There are the Counter Braces ala Long and the Braces join the posts in Long fashion as opposed to Childs - And more importantly the Truss Rods are configured opposite of how a Childs conveys loads from panel to panel, they would be ascending not descending.

I suspect the rods were either added post build or were used in lieu of the pre-tensioning wedges in the Long patent.

I've visited the Sherman variants, but not this bridge and am somewhat reluctant to edit the page based solely on photographs. At the same time I think it a bit silly to miscategorize the bridge simply because the Historic marker was written based on assumption over research.

Does anyone who has visited have better shots, or an opinion as to type?

Posted July 18, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

I might have been joking....

Posted July 18, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Makes sense now Ed... Not sure just what he thinks the Bridgehunter Nation can do about it though!

Posted July 17, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

He must mean Need Stuck, one of the local river warrens who likes to do surprise boardings at this bridge and check boaters safety equipment.

Posted July 16, 2017, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Not sure what you mean here Alex... But anyway good luck with complaining to the railroad!

Posted July 16, 2017, by Alex mullen (Ron [dot] mullen [at] realalloy [dot] com)

We have need stuck on our boat 3 times in the last 2 months for over 2 hours each time. Please fix this. We plan to file complaints.

Posted July 12, 2017, by Anonymous
Posted July 7, 2017, by Anonymous

Muskingum County was nearly sued by the Federal Government because this bridge was too low to allow canal boat traffic to pass beneath it.

According to reports from the Corps of Engineers from the late 1800's, after the original canal was abandoned and the lock placed at the present location, boat traffic no longer had the clearance of the moveable canal bridge in the picture above and many larger boats were unable to clear the new passage underneath the main bridge.

I am fairly certain the piers from this bridge have been used in every rebuild of the bridge, including the one which still (barely) stands today.

Posted July 7, 2017, by Anonymous

The stoplight is a point of aggravation with the locals. It seems it is more put in place to artificially allow semi trucks and other heavy loads to cross the river here instead of the much worse bridge at Philo. the light causes a large string of traffic to cross the bridge at once, effectively counteracting the 'one lane' policy anyway.

This bridge receives more traffic but is the scapegoat for the upriver one.

Posted June 28, 2017, by Michael Quiet (mquiet [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hello Paul,

I think one of the problems is that this isn't a 'real' covered bridge, as it looks the National Bridge Inventory identifies this as a pre-stressed concrete beam. There are quite a few of these around, and it gets kinda tricky to assign a genuine covered bridge truss type to them as they generally are more stylized and only loosely conform to the real patterns.

Generally I try to avoid assigning historic truss types to these as I feel that it might muddy the waters for others researching/visiting genuine covered bridges. For example this one up in my neck of the woods: http://bridgehunter.com/ny/essex/kissing/ has a resemblance to a Town Lattice, but since it doesn't work as one and is only decorative I think its inappropriate to pass it off as such. Instead I simply identify it as a covered plate girder, since the actual bridge is a plate girder type. Therefore on yours I would refer to that as a Covered stringer bridge, with a notation that the roof support has a truss like appearance, as it doesn't directly conform to any genuine type.

Hope that helps!

-Michael

Posted June 28, 2017, by Paul Farrier (paulfarrier [at] gmail [dot] com)

Greetings!

I'm checking the facts for website and book I am writing and this bridge is listed here as a Multiple Kingpost. However, it doesn't appear to fit the descriptions, drawings, and other photos I have of Multiple Kingpost bridges.

However, because I am not an engineer nor an expert in covered bridges, I would like any information you might have that may have as to would make this bridge a Multiple Kingpost.

You may check out my listing of the bridge at https://ohioscoveredbridgesbypaulfarrier.wordpress.com/2017/...

Warm regards,

Paul Farrier

Posted June 27, 2017, by Clover Nico Star (greydelislefan [at] gmail [dot] com)

Sigh.

Another historic bridge (and a unique one due to the 90-degree approaches on either side) gone, replaced with yet another boring cable-stayed bridge... :(

Posted June 24, 2017, by Ed Hollowell (erhollowell [at] aol [dot] com)

Over a year ago this editorial was published about the bridge. I see nothing newer. http://www.theintelligencer.net/opinion/editorials/2016/01/a...