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Posted October 13, 2019, by Doug Law (lawd1968 [at] gmail [dot] coim)

Some drone pics of this bridge

Posted October 1, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

This bridge makes a very brief appearance in a Safelite Commercial. https://www.ispot.tv/ad/oJUz/safelite-auto-glass-decompressi...

Posted September 27, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Also, supposedly, Washington Roebling (John's son) worked for CBW based on info in this link: http://www.douglascoulter.com/BridgeSigns/columbia_bridge_co...

If so, I'd be curious as to who influenced who...

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 27, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I had a bunch of pictures of this and other CBWs that I lost years ago. I came upon the viewer slide recently which so I thought I'd post.

The inverted bowstring is interesting. Its essentially a suspension bridge, with the 'bow' in tension but, unlike a suspension bridge, it doesn't need anchors for the suspension 'bow' beyond the bridge like modern suspension bridges because the top chord is in compression and keeps the endposts standing.

A true structural analysis would be interesting.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted September 24, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tony, I will be avoiding Any overgrown lane until my poison ivy/oak is Gone

Posted September 24, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

That's definitely right up your alley Melissa!

Or should I say "Down your overgrown lane"?

Posted September 24, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Love the overgrowth

Posted September 23, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I thought I was looking at a continuous truss... and a Whipple at that! Very cool!

Posted September 23, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

If you are cheap (or after hours as was my case), you can pull over on Velma Avenue and walk up stairs next to the building exit doors that take you up to the roof for a good elevated view of the bridge.

Posted September 23, 2019, by David Case

A great bridge, fairly long for Ohio. I would say the restoration was a complete build of a new bridge. I drove through in 2019 and each span seems to have a slight sag to it now.

Posted September 22, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

I just wanna drive on it!

Posted September 22, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I find it Fascinating

Posted September 22, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

This bridge may have been in existence in 1911.

http://euclidevolution.blogspot.com/2018/05/abandoned-hillan...

Ransome rebar, so probably before 1920.

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-egzSHF2iORg/XIReHQ9JOvI/AAAAAAAAL...

Posted September 22, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Beautiful

Posted September 9, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Yes Nathan, it was there when I dropped a pin on it 9 years ago. Can only hope they moved it.

Posted September 9, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Tony,

Are you sure these are the right coords for this bridge? If yes, it looks like its been replaced with a culvert.

Posted September 7, 2019, by Rebekah Headings (rebekahmary [at] chuckeryohio [dot] com)

This is not an abandoned bridge. It is a private farm bridge and very much still in use. It belongs to one of my cousins.

Posted September 6, 2019, by Colton Tabler (plantsvillekid [at] gmail [dot] com)

The bridge will be closed to vehicles soon and allow foot traffic only.

Posted August 26, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Simple mistake that's all

Posted August 26, 2019, by Daniel

With the overhead braces, why is this listed as pony rather than through?

Posted August 21, 2019, by Richard Precht (son [dot] follower1 [at] gmail [dot] com)

I will post this to share that the creek I lived and played by was "Garrett Creek". The RR Tressel crossed over Garrett Creek and we played on the Wabash Railroad and on the Tressle Bridge many times -- One day, Me and the "boys" from the "hood" nearly got ran over by an East bound frieght train while on the Bridge. The ties were spread about 18 inches apart and not easy to run across when a train is about to end your life! I took a dive at the end of the Tressel into the "cinder bed" and got all scraped up but was glad that Angel shoved me off the tracks in the nick of time! Whew! Thank You Jesus for watching over me "Sooo many times"!

Posted August 20, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Posted August 6, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Visited today to find the bridge has been dismantled and taken off site for rehabilitation by Ohio Bridge Corporation. Expect it will be galvanized like the Seven Mile Creek Bridge was.

Posted July 29, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Oh I Love it !!!

Posted July 27, 2019, by james mccray (jamesinslocomb [at] yahoo [dot] com)

There is a fellow bridge hunter who regularly posts on this site named Jonathan Parrish. Perhaps both of you are related. Family reunion time.

Posted July 26, 2019, by Ida Hawkins (hawkinsidam [at] aol [dot] com)

Can you tell me what Parrish the Parrish bridge was named after? They were most likely related to me. Thank you.

Posted July 21, 2019, by Jeremy Loukinas (jeremy dot loukinas at gmail dot com)

Visiting the bridge today and flew it with a DJI 4k Quadcopter.

Posted July 17, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony ! I immediately thought of you when I read New Castle as the builder !

Posted July 17, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Great find Melissa!

Posted July 17, 2019, by Douglas Butler

This lift bridge is delayed canceling trips ,the bridge is stuck in the lower position defaulted for more than two hours on channel 5 news!!!!!!!

Posted July 16, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

(3) seems at least possible, if only because this wouldn't be the only span to have an article posted recently that reported on a collapse, only for the replacement to not be until several years later. Seems like there's been at least a few of those posted.

If not, then the alternative would be that (2) comes into play for all of those as well.

Posted July 16, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Although this bridge doesn't appear to be very long, the passing of a diagonal member through the first vertical on the Right side tells me that this was a Whipple truss.

As for the NBI discrepancy, there are a couple possibilities.

1) That the road was closed for 25 years before a new bridge was constructed... Seems highly unlikely for a bridge on a state route.

2) The 1963 bridge was a replacement OF the replacement. If a new span was thrown up hastily just to get the road back open then this seems far more feasible.

3) The bridge was able to be repaired and lasted another 25 years.

I would probably lean on option #2

Posted July 15, 2019, by Satolli Glassmeyer (info [at] HistoryInYourOwnBackyard [dot] com)

1914

Dresden Suspension Bridge

Dresden, Ohio

We just completed a short documentary video on the history of the Dresden Bridge. Click on the link below to see a video on the bridge. http://www.scorphq.com/YouTube/pg.php?v=59Du-3QAMyA

Posted July 14, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks to Everyone for the information!

Posted July 14, 2019, by Luke

It does, but only 5 images, all of which are contemporary shots vs historical ones.

Posted July 14, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

Interesting. Does HAER have images? The newspaper articles seem to refer to this bridge surviving the flood, but that may not be accurate. Also the posted images are not clear enough but the midpoint connections on the verticals in the second to last imagine seem unusual. The verticals are not Keystone Columns based on the external path of the tension elements. Given the build date could they be cast or early Phoenix?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 14, 2019, by Luke

Doh! Missed that bit in proofreading.

Unfortunately a large chunk of the HAER datasheet spends time talking about the great flood of 1889 that the then-new stone bridge survived rather than delving into the history of the previous structure.

Posted July 14, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Luke,

I think you mean 1865 rather than 1895. Otherwise, I think you got it right! Very cool. Ignoring the portals, which may have been simplified during the relocation, are there clues to the manufacturer, given the 1865 build date and the wrought iron construction?

Regards,

Art S.

Posted July 13, 2019, by Luke

1897 has been confirmed as a relocation date per articles from the Xenia Daily Gazette from the period.

https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/5200763/

The following excerpt is from the HAER document on the 1886-88 Stone Bridge in Johnstown:

"PRR constructed its first all-iron bridge at Johnstown in 1850. This structure, on the same site as the present structure, consisted of five 75'-0" arch-reinforced

Pratt truss spans over the Conemaugh River. Fifteen years later, the spans were replaced with heavier Pratt trusses (sans arches). This structure sufficed until the PRR began another round of main-line improvements in 1886."

Anyone willing to bet the 1895 Pratts were double intersection Pratts, AKA Whipples?

Posted July 13, 2019, by Mark Yurina (markyurina [at] gmail [dot] com)

This bridge is apparently property of the monroe county commissioners and as such was listed on their insurance policy. One of the commissioners made a statement that a 1.2 million policy claim has already been filed...presumably to fund reconstruction. Hopefully what has been spoken concerning the bridge will come to fruition.

Posted July 13, 2019, by John Marvig

Wow! This appears to be a really old Whipple built for railroad use prior to being used on a road. Nice find!

Posted July 13, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Pic #5 needs to be moved to the new page that Melissa made for the arch bridge... "Third Street Bridge-Older".

Posted July 13, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted July 8, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Idk about the name change. Hmm...

Posted July 8, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Mike, I've searched for information about the demise of this bridge; no luck yet. I'm curious how long did it last; what did it in ?

Posted July 8, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

Hmmm. Well, that's equal parts nice that they repurposed it, at least for a little while, and sad that it ultimately didn't last. I wonder what its ultimate fate was - did they finally knock it down, or did something (like Mother Nature) take it down?

(Sidebar: It still called this the Bailey Road Bridge on the comment page, probably because it still had that name for my earlier post?)

Posted July 8, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Article...

Posted July 8, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

The News-Herald: May 20 1964

Posted July 8, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Mike I believe after the new high bridge was built in 62' that the old truss bridge remained in place for a time. I've seen a pic where it was blocked off at each side.

Posted July 8, 2019, by Mike Kerkau (mjkerkau [at] gmail [dot] com)

There's a mislabeling somewhere - the caption for the high water picture says it's during 4th of July weekend 1964, but the stats say this was lost in 1962. (If I had to pick, I'd bet the picture caption is wrong, but that's just a guess.)

Posted July 7, 2019, by Trudy Bates (Tebates [at] zoominternet [dot] net)

This bridge was part of my familyí s heritage as my Grandfather was a Knowlton from Monroe County. Back in the early 1900ís he married a Foraker which her family built the Foraker bridge. My father has passed, but he was so proud of the fact that both of these bridges were built by his family...I am so very saddened that this happened. Since the county has definitely dropped the ball in not using money allocated to fix it up, I truly hope that this can be rebuilt.

Posted July 7, 2019, by Mark Yurina (markyurina [at] gmail [dot] com)

Looks like a smartphone video actually caught the collapse of the bridge, which was around 6pm on the 5th. It's absolutely disgusting... this is a piece of local heritage that we who live around here can never get back.

Posted July 6, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Another casualty of neglect! I understand that the county had just received a grant to rehabilitate the bridge. I suspect if there is enough interest the money might be able to be used towards a rebuild. Some of the original wood might be salvageable, although I'm sure much of it was reduced to splinters. The approach spans likely remained standing because of the I-beams that were added to them.

Posted July 6, 2019, by Will Truax (Bridgewright [at] gmail [dot] com)

It was the middle span that was lost, my guess is that is about long missing siding.

Posted July 2, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

The use of corrugated (ribbon lacing) for primary members, and the pin connected Warren truss configuration remains atypical.

Posted July 2, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Posted July 1, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Very unusual bridge! Reference was made to two detail photos, which I was able to view for free online here:

https://newspaperarchive.com/washington-c-h-record-herald-de...

As seen in these two photos, it would appear to be composed of Phoenix columns, but its possible another builder purchased raw Phoenix columns as this bridge doesn't match any of the "name brand" Phoenix bridges.

Posted July 1, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Wonder if it could have been fabricated by Louisville Bridge & Iron.

Posted June 29, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

The portals say early Phoenix to me but its hard to make out if they are Phoenix columns. Note the truss type!

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 24, 2019, by Nathan Holth (webmaster [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

Believe the attached photo as shown in the following book may show the bridge before the concrete arch at this location (or perhaps a previous bridge on the other side of the island). This island was home to a "White City" amusement park before the flood of 1913.

https://books.google.com/books?id=9uBCAAAAIAAJ&dq=1913%20Flo...

Posted June 24, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thank you as always!

Posted June 23, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Tony, I think it was an ad for the Bridge Company! I cropped most of it out. But it was very informative. Yes, I'll magically make the photo appear 😉

Posted June 23, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

A Whipple !

Posted June 23, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Posted June 23, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Posted June 23, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Great article written about the bridge... And it wasn't to say "Kiss it goodbye because it's being demoed!". Historic name of bridge given. Accurate build date and fabricator along with commissioners given. Even talks about the previous bridge and that it was built by the same firm!

This B.E. Kelley was my kind of writer!

P.S. Melissa... Please dig up a pic of the pre-1900 bridge that was here. Given the description I'm betting it was a 3-span version of one of those awesome Champion Bowstring pony trusses! Thanks in advance! ;-)

Posted June 23, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Posted June 22, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted June 22, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thank you both !

Posted June 21, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Tony,

I donít disagree. While I didnít list it, I suspect that the article was relied on for the date.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted June 21, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

While I totally agree that this is no doubt a Massillon built span, I do think they have the date wrong. The portals that matched their bowstring trusses were built from the late 1870's until 1885. The flat Lattice portals were used in the 1890's.

Posted June 20, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Posted June 20, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted June 20, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted June 8, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted June 7, 2019, by Della Rocco (Cfdellarocco [at] gmail [dot] com)

The new bridge totally takes away from the charm of downtown Waterville. Unfortunately, the final countdown is close.

Posted June 5, 2019, by Dana and Kay Klein

Nice shots Sandor, thanks for posting.

Posted June 4, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted May 31, 2019, by Anonymous

1895

Posted May 31, 2019, by Anonymous

1907

Posted May 31, 2019, by Anonymous

1908

Posted May 29, 2019, by Mike Daffron (daffmikron [at] gmail [dot] com)

Wow! Kinda twisted, thinking about it like that, but I believe I agree

Posted May 29, 2019, by Dennis Madia (dmadia [at] fuse [dot] net)

I have several photos of this bridge over the years (going back to 1994 or so).I wish it could have been saved, but since it wasn't, I am more OK with this than the county deciding it was time for it to go and remove it. The bridge sort of went on its own terms.

Posted May 29, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony!

Posted May 29, 2019, by Don Morrison

Also the picture was saved in a lossy format. (.jpg)

More detail would be preserved in a bitmap or .png or .tga image.

Maybe the plate on the right says 87, hard to tell.

Posted May 28, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Oh, Millions of people would Melissa!

Talk about your tourist destination!

Posted May 28, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I would've paid to have my photo taken next to it !

Posted May 28, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

This bridge should have been maintained... With the CAR INTACT as a shrine to one of the greatest driving feats EVER accomplished!!!

Posted May 28, 2019, by Clark Vance (cvance [at] dogmail [dot] com)

A scan of a newspaper photo doesn't have the resolution. If the paper has the original photo it might be possible.

Posted May 27, 2019, by Tony Dillon (spansaver [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Your welcome! X6 ;-)

Posted May 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted May 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted May 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Tony !

Posted May 27, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

I'm not sure if anyone can enhance the first photo but the blocks on the upper corners have the build date cast into them and I'd be curious what the lower central plaque text said.

Posted May 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

I was excited to find it !

Posted May 27, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

My pleasure Melissa.

Thanks for doing the work to find it.

Regards,

Art S.

Posted May 27, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Ooh...a Rezner :^)

Nice find!

Posted May 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Thanks Art !

Posted May 27, 2019, by Melissa Brand-Welch (melissabrandwelch [at] msn [dot] com)

Art, thank you for your knowledge and assistance!

Posted May 27, 2019, by Art S. (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Great find Melissa!

What a heartbreaker.

I didn't realize CBW changed the portal design immediately upon reorganization upon David Morrison's death in 1882. I thought the changeover would have occurred in 1884-1885.

'Bubbles' portals:

http://bridgehunter.com/pa/montgomery/467046040002310/

'Sunray' portals:

http://bridgehunter.com/oh/licking/gallman-road/

This means 'Bubbles' is 1876 or 1877 to 1882 and 'Sunray' is 1883 to 1888 or 1889 (Carlton is 1888 with Sunray portals but there is presently no evidence of whether the last bridges had them).

Regards,

Art S.