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Y&S - Grimms Bridge Tunnel

Photos 

Photo taken by Sherman Cahal in February 2017

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BH Photo #379603

Map 

Description 

The Youngstown & Southern Railroad (Y&S) Smiths Ferry Branch extended for 13 miles from Negley, Ohio to the Ohio River at Smiths Ferry, Pennsylvania. The Y&S was a subsidiary of the Pittsburgh Coal Company.

The branch included a 1,200-foot tunnel at Grimms Bridge, and a trestle over Beeler's Run.

Operation of the Smiths Ferry Branch began in mid-1936 with 50 to 60 carloads daily. Coal mined from Pittsburgh Coal along the Monongahela River was shipped by barge to Smiths Ferry where derrick shovels transferred it into a waiting train. The coal was then hauled a plant south of Negley where it was washed, graded and reloaded. It was then taken to Negley and transferred to the Pittsburgh, Lisbon & Western Railroad. The coal was hauled seven miles to Signal where it was taken over by the Youngstown & Suburban and delivered to steel mills in and around Youngstown.

In 1967, the Tassi Coal Company, a strip mine operation, went bankrupt. The mining in the Grimms Bridge area included work on a hill above the Grimms Bridge tunnel. After a heavy rain, spill and rock slid over the edge of the hill and covered the south end of the tunnel.

Without the funds to clean up the tunnel, the Y&S sought federal permission to abandon the Negley-Smiths Ferry Branch on April 26, 1977.

Facts 

Overview
Abandoned tunnel on Formerly Youngstown & Southern Railroad
Location
Columbiana County, Ohio
Status
Derelict/abandoned
Future prospects
Future rail-to-trail.
Builder
- Booth & Glinn Co.
Design
Tunnel
Dimensions
Total length: 1,200.0 ft.
Also called
Grimms Tunnel
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.67563, -80.53895   (decimal degrees)
40°40'32" N, 80°32'20" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
17/538964/4502851 (zone/easting/northing)
Inventory number
BH 75748 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • February 21, 2017: Updated by Sherman Cahal: History