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Bronx River Bridge

Photos 

Ardsley Road Bridge

Note the triangular shape of the piers and the stone clading that marks this structure as a Renaissance Revival design. The bridge was designed by Charles W. Stoughton and the design engineer was Arthur G. Hayden.

The bridge is referenced in Charles S. Whitney's 1929 book, Bridges: A Study In Their Art, Science and Evolution that was republished in 2002 as Bridges of the World and is shown in Plate 261.

This Renaissance Revival design influenced Whitney in his design of the Range Line Road Bridge in River Hills, Wisconsin.

Photo taken by John Reidy

View larger version

BH Photo #145854

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Concrete arch bridge over Bronx River on Ardsley Road (CR 78) in Scarsdale
Location
Westchester County, New York
Status
Open to traffic
History
Built 1924
Design
Closed-spandrel arch
Dimensions
Length of largest span: 35.8 ft.
Total length: 42.0 ft.
Deck width: 34.5 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+40.98884, -73.81006   (decimal degrees)
40°59'20" N, 73°48'36" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/600093/4538199 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Mount Vernon
Average daily traffic (as of 2010)
11,155
Inventory numbers
NY 3348280 (New York State bridge identification number)
BH 27082 (Bridgehunter.com ID)
Inspection report (as of June 2017)
Overall condition: Fair
Superstructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Substructure condition rating: Satisfactory (6 out of 9)
Sufficiency rating: 54.9 (out of 100)
View more at BridgeReports.com

Update Log 

  • April 17, 2010: New Street View added by James Baughn
  • September 5, 2009: New photo from J.R. Manning

Sources 

  • J.R. Manning - thekitchenguy [at] sbcglobal [dot] net
  • John Reidy

Comments 

Bronx River Bridge
Posted February 2, 2009, by John Reidy (jmreidy [at] hotmail [dot] com)

Twin spans over the Bronx River and the Bronx River Parkway. The river bank was extended out on one side to allow the bike path to pass underneath the bridge. A built-in stairway allows pedestrians to descend from street level to the bike path.

Webmaster's note: The photos that were here have been incorporated into the main site.