Rating:
2 votes

Japanese Bridge

Photo 

View Beside Bridge

Photo Courtesy Shelter Island at www.shelter-island.org

View this photo at shelter-island.org

BH Photo #255938

Map 

Description 

Located at Francis Marion Smith's estate Presdeleau, 22 Merkel Lane Shelter Island, New York. This bridge is highly significant as one of only two known surviving bridges built by Ernest L. Ransome, a pioneer in reinforced concrete construction. Reportedly built in late 19th or early 20th Century. Reportedly, it can be viewed from a public path south of 22 Merkle Lane.

Facts 

Overview
Closed-spandrel arch bridge over Inlet on Pedestrian Walkway
Location
Suffolk County, New York
Status
Open to pedestrians only
Builder
- Ernest L. Ransome of England
Design
Closed-spandrel deck arch
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.05073, -72.31932   (decimal degrees)
41°03'03" N, 72°19'10" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/725287/4547851 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Greenport
Inventory number
BH 56566 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • June 11, 2013: Added by Nathan Holth

Comments 

Japanese Bridge
Posted June 12, 2013, by Jodi Christman (masterofchaos [at] outlook [dot] com)

If this helps your pursuit, in New York state (like Pennsylvania), the usual demarcation line between public and private is the high-water mark. During low tide you technically could access the area, but be aware that owners may not be fully aware of the law and think you are trespassing. Good luck.

Japanese Bridge
Posted June 11, 2013, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

You literally have to go from sea to shining sea to view the only known surviving Ransome designed concrete bridges! This is located at the tip of Long Island, and the other one is in Golden Gate Park! Supposedly there is a walkway from which you can view this private bridge, although this was not apparent to me from Street View or Satellite images. I don't know anything about the ocean or New York State, but where I grew up along Lake Huron in Michigan it was legal to walk along the water even on private beaches. If this was true here, the bridge could easily be viewed legally.