Rating:
2 votes

Petticoat Lane Bridge

Photos 

Side view

Photo taken by Kent Findley

BH Photo #108084

Map 

Street View 

Facts 

Overview
Removed through truss bridge over Shawangunk Kill on Petticoat Lane, northeast of Bloomingburgh
Location
Orange County, New York, and Sullivan County, New York
Status
In storage/disassembled
History
Built 1884 by the Groton Iron Bridge Co.
Builder
- Groton Bridge Co. of Groton, New York
Design
Pin-connected, 7-panel Pratt through truss
Dimensions
Span length: 97.8 ft.
Total length: 97.8 ft.
Deck width: 14.1 ft.
Vertical clearance above deck: 12.6 ft.
Approximate latitude, longitude
+41.57301, -74.40842   (decimal degrees)
41°34'23" N, 74°24'30" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
18/549319/4602538 (zone/easting/northing)
Quadrangle map:
Wurtsboro
Inventory numbers
NY 3344340 (New York State bridge identification number)
BH 26568 (Bridgehunter.com ID)

Update Log 

  • April 25, 2010: New Street View added by Nathan Holth
  • January 15, 2007: Posted photos from Kent Findley

Sources 

  • Kent Findley - kent [dot] findley [at] gmail [dot] com
  • Nathan Holth

Comments 

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted August 22, 2014, by Joel Wyman (ponchoman49 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Shame. Another piece of history lost. Bet the new replacement doesn't last 126 years with but a new deck. More like 26 years I think before it needs work!

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted July 21, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

For sale on Craigslist:

HISTORIC BRIDGE FOR SALE - $17500 (LOWER HUDSON VALLEY)

The Petticoate Lane Bridge, also known as the Maple Grove Bridge, built in 1884 by the Groton Iron Bridge Company, is an iron, pinned and riveted, Pratt through truss, commonly built during the mid-nineteenth through the twentieth century. Thomas and Caleb Pratt first patented the truss in 1844, combining thin diagonals in tension with heavier verticals in compression. Bridge firms throughout the country, including Groton, adopted this truss for mass manufacture in iron and later in steel. Original vertical channel beam components are embossed P. R.

http://hudsonvalley.craigslist.org/bfs/4579448652.html

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted April 15, 2014, by ArtS (asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)
Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted December 5, 2013, by Art S. (Asuckewer [at] knite [dot] com)

Apparently the bridge has been disassembled but is in storage and available for acquisition and reuse.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted September 1, 2011, by Donna (xqzd [at] aol [dot] com)

I remember in the 70's the bridge was renovated. They removed the old wooden plank floors and paved it. The DOT workers would allow us to cross over on the steel beams and would carry our collie across for us.

In the 70s locals believed that there were cult rituals under the bridge at night because in the morning waiting for the bus a few times we found dead goats hanging from the bridge.

My sister, who as a child loved to fish would sit on the bridge with her home made fishing pole and pull trout out all day long. One day a professional fly fisherman approached her and asked.. "What are you using for bait"? She replied "Shicken"

For some the bridge might have been an eyesore but I see it as a part of my history and have always felt it was a beautiful bridge. Many of the homes at the foot of Petticoat lane were originally bungalow colonies for the NYC folks. Most of them sat on the banks of the Sha Wan Gunk kill as it meandered around toward the Town of Crawford.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted May 1, 2010, by russ.f (wmt1 [at] citlink [dot] net)

You still have not expanded how it misleading. 1.1 million dollars is being spent by a nearly bankrupt state.

I really don't care what is done with this old eyesore of a bridge, as long as it not costing me anything.

These Historical zealots almost always expect the taxpayers to foot the bill for there personal fetishes.

Someone who thinks this wreck is beautiful and new foot bridge that does not even exist is ugly , I believe falls into the Zealot category.

I truly do admire your passion, but It stops where I end up paying for it.

It will not matter how much money is spent on the new, or the old bridge, so jerk is going to come along with a 2 dollar can of spray paint and turn it back into an eyesore.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted April 22, 2010, by Nathan Holth (form3 [at] historicbridges [dot] org)

"Loads of your tax dollars" to reuse this bridge for pedestrians in a park is a rather misleading statement. The truth is that preserving and reusing a truss bridge in a park generally costs a similar amount or less than the cost of building an ugly new pedestrian bridge. So preservation is a win-win since its fiscally sound and also retains a beautiful and historic bridge.

I also think its important to realize that what highway agencies and newspapers describe as "same type construction" for the replacement bridge likely is anything but. While it may be possible that the replacement bridge is a truss bridge, you can rest assured that it is otherwise absolutely nothing like the historic bridge. Truss configuration, connection type, stylistic details, etc will all be completely different.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted April 22, 2010, by Russ (wmt1 [at] citlink [dot] net)

This baby is going!!! On monday Apirl 26, 2010, workers will stop all traffic and start dismantalling this bridge.

Thanks to the Histarical Socity and loads of your tax dollars, its being trucked off to some state park to be used as a foot bridge.

At a cost of 1.1 million dollars, its replcement, I'm told will be of the same type construction, but with a slight angle and two full lanes.

I try to get some picture up of the two cranes picking this puppy up (in one peace) and loading it on the truck.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted April 22, 2010, by Russ F. (wmt1 [at] citlink [dot] net)

This baby is going!!! On monday Apirl 26, 2010, workers will stop all traffic and start dismantalling this bridge.

Thanks to the Histarical Socity and loads of your tax dollars, its being trucked off to some state park to be used as a foot bridge.

At a cost of 1.1 million dollars, its replcement, I'm told will be of the same type construction, but with a slight angle and two full lanes.

I try to get some picture up of the two cranes picking this puppy up (in one peace) and loading it on the truck.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted March 14, 2008, by Russ F. (wmt1 [at] citlink [dot] net)

I can't wait till they get rid of this useless eye sore. This bridge is falling apart. The school buses and emergence vehicles can't cross it. This think is in such bad shape, the highway department can't even plow it after a show storm. They've added one large steel plate to cover a gaping hole in the deck and need to add another before something falls through. To bad the thing wasn't made of wood!

I've read on the web, it's going to be replace in 2009. That's if the local hysterical society doesn't muck things up.

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted August 15, 2007, by Kim (Rabczewski) Dodson (kimdodson63 [at] yahoo [dot] com)

Wow, this really brings back memories of my teen years. Remember when we used to think that was "the spot". Everyone used to meet there and hang out. It's also the place we would go to sneak a cigarette! What fun memories!

Petticoat Lane Bridge
Posted August 14, 2007, by ruthellen cannizzo (dodo2862 [at] aol [dot] com)

This brings back so many memories. I grew up hanging out there every summer until we finally moved up there in 1976 and then my friends and I would hang out at "the bridge" everyday. We caught the schoolbus there each morning and got off the bus each afternoon. We lived only 2 houses away from it. My brother fished there daily and we even swam under it.In bad weather we hung out under "the bridge" I love that place.It is a beautiful bridge and in the fall with all the colors on the trees it is a beautiful site.